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Tiptonville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
the distance over land from Island No.10 to Tiptonville is five miles, while by water it is twenty-its waters into the river forty miles below Tiptonville, leaving the whole peninsula opposite New-M.10 along the west bank of Reelfoot Lake to Tiptonville. The only means of supply, therefore, for ticable on the land-side. One mile below Tiptonville begin the great swamps along the Mississippercepting the navigation of the river below Tiptonville, and commanding by heavy artillery the lowe steal up close along the opposite shore to Tiptonville, but always at such great risk that it was e shore from Island No.10 entirely round to Tiptonville, at every point where troops could be landeo him. The divisions were pushed forward to Tiptonville as fast as they were landed, Paine leading.ss the river and pushing forward rapidly to Tiptonville. The enemy retreating before Paine, and fr when we got under way, and crossed over to Tiptonville, the enemy having disappeared. The offic[9 more...]
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 140
fifteen. So likewise the distance over land from Island No.10 to Tiptonville is five miles, while by water it is twenty-seven. Commencing at Hickman, a great swamp, which afterward becomes Reelfoot Lake, extends along the left bank of the Mississippi and discharges its waters into the river forty miles below Tiptonville, leaving the whole peninsula opposite New-Madrid between it and the river. This peninsula, therefore, is itself an island, having the Mississippi on three sides, and Reelfr Walke. United States gunboat Carondelet, off Tiptonville, Tenn., April 8. sir: In accordance with the instructions of Gen. Pope, I received on board Gen. Granger and staff, on the morning of the sixth inst., and proceeded down the Mississippi River, opposite to this place, making an extensive reconnoissance. On our way down we exchanged a few shots with some of the enemy's batteries on the Tennessee shore, and on our way back we attacked two siegeguns, twenty-four-pounders, which had
Point Pleasant (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
after the reduction of New-Madrid, this subject engaged my attention. The roads along the river, in the direction of Point Pleasant, followed a narrow strip of dry land between the swamps and the river, and were very miry and difficult. With much l the shore, between the batteries. On his return up the river, Captain Walke silenced the enemy's battery opposite Point Pleasant, and a small infantry force, under Capt. L. H. Marshall, landed and spiked the guns. On the night of the sixth, at m send another gunboat, and requested that I should go down the river, and destroy the remaining rebel batteries above Point Pleasant. At dawn the following morning, and after a given signal, he informed me he would land his army, and attack that of her instructions from Gen. Pope, and covered their disembarkation on the Tennessee shore, at the captured fort, above Point Pleasant. At evening, we steamed down to our camp, opposite the enemy's fort, at this place, headed the gunboats for the en
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 140
roops, on the morning of the seventh of April. On the fourth, Commodore Foote allowed one of the gunboats to run the batteries at Island No.10, and Capt. Walke, U. S.N., who had volunteered — as appears from the Commodore's order to him — came through that night with the gunboat Carondelet. Although many shots were fired at himves me profound satisfaction to report that it was accomplished without loss of life. John Pope, Major-General Commanding. Report of Commander Walke. United States gunboat Carondelet, off Tiptonville, Tenn., April 8. sir: In accordance with the instructions of Gen. Pope, I received on board Gen. Granger and staff, on tsel, during the trials and dangers of the battle, conducted them-selves with admirable coolness and ability. To do justice to many of them, will require a more detailed letter. Most respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, H. Walke, Commander U. S.N. To Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, Commander U. S. Naval Forces, Western Water
Reelfoot Lake (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
y water it is twenty-seven. Commencing at Hickman, a great swamp, which afterward becomes Reelfoot Lake, extends along the left bank of the Mississippi and discharges its waters into the river for This peninsula, therefore, is itself an island, having the Mississippi on three sides, and Reelfoot Lake and the great swamps which border it on the other. A good road leads from Island No.10 along the west bank of Reelfoot Lake to Tiptonville. The only means of supply, therefore, for the forces at and around Island No.10, on this peninsula, was by the river. When the river was blockaded atThere was no communication with the interior, except by a small flatboat, which plied across Reelfoot Lake, a distance of two miles, and that through an opening cut through cypress-swamps for the pur for safe keeping, and proceeded to cross the country in the direction of Tiptonville, along Reelfoot Lake, as directed. It is almost impossible to give a correct account of the immense quantity o
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
l. Bissell having reported a road impracticable, but that a route could be found for a channel sufficient for small steamers, I immediately directed him to commence the canal, with the whole regiment, and to call on Col. Buford, commanding the land — forces temporarily on duty with the flotilla, (which had been placed under my command,) for any assistance in men or material necessary for the work. Supplies of such articles as were needed, and four steamers of light draught, were sent for to Cairo, and the work begun. It was my purpose to make the canal deep enough for the gunboats ; but it was not found practicable to do so within any reasonable period. The work performed by Col. Bissell and his regiment of Engineers was, beyond measure, difficult; and its completion was delayed much beyond my expectations. The canal is twelve miles long, six miles of which are through very heavy timber. An avenue fifty feet wide was made through it, by sawing off trees of large size four and a h
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 140
o attempt against the battery was made, and all communication from below with the forces near Island No.10 was cut off. One of the gunboats would occasionally, during a dark night, steal up close along the opposite shore to Tiptonville, but always at such great risk that it was seldom undertaken. Neither supplies nor men could be taken up or carried off in this way. Such was the condition of affairs on the six-teenth of March. The object for which the land-forces had been moved on New — Madrid was accomplished in the capture of that place and the blockade of the river to any supplies and reeforcements for the enemy at and around Island No.10. Meantime the flotilla had been firing at long range, both from the gun and mortar-boats, at the batteries of the enemy in and opposite the Island, for seven consecutive days, without any apparent effect, and without any advance whatever toward their reduction. This result was doubtless due to the defective construction of the boats. On
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
Doc. 136.-capture of Island no.10. General Pope's official detailed report. headquarters army of the Mississippi, five miles from Corinth, Miss., April 30th, 1862. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations which resulted in the capture of Island No.10, and the batteries on the main shore, together with the whole of the land-forces of the enemy in that vicinity. A brief sketch of the topography of the immediate neighborhood seems essential to a full understanding of the operations of the army. Island No.10 lies at the bottom of a great bend of the Mississippi, immediately north of it being a long, narrow promontory on the Missouri shore. The river from Island No.10 flows north-west to New-Madrid, where it again makes a great bend to the south as far as Tiptonville, otherwise called Merriweather's Landing, so that opposite New-Madrid also is a long, narrow promontory. From Island No.8, about four miles above Island No.10 the distance a
New Madrid, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
river from Island No.10 flows north-west to New-Madrid, where it again makes a great bend to the soled Merriweather's Landing, so that opposite New-Madrid also is a long, narrow promontory. From IslIsland No.10 the distance across the land to New-Madrid is six miles, while by river it is fifteen. nville, leaving the whole peninsula opposite New-Madrid between it and the river. This peninsula, taping. Immediately after the reduction of New-Madrid, this subject engaged my attention. The roainsula from some point above Island No.10 to New-Madrid, in order that steam-transports might be broyou which discharges into the Mississippi at New-Madrid, but were kept carefully out of sight of thee ordered the Pittsburgh also to run down to New-Madrid. She arrived at daylight, having, like the ave again recrossed and occupied the camp at New-Madrid, without losing a man or meeting with an acc we were within range. After my return to New-Madrid, Gen. Pope informed me of your intention to [4 more...]
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
id also is a long, narrow promontory. From Island No.8, about four miles above Island No.10 the diIsland No.10 the distance across the land to New-Madrid is six miles, while by river it is fifteen. So likewise the dier it on the other. A good road leads from Island No.10 along the west bank of Reelfoot Lake to Tiply, therefore, for the forces at and around Island No.10, on this peninsula, was by the river. Whenmmunication from below with the forces near Island No.10 was cut off. One of the gunboats would occas to a point on the Missouri shore opposite Island No.10, and transfer a portion of my force, sufficr and assailing the enemy's batteries, near Island No.10, in the rear. On the seventeenth of Marcme become very apparent that the capture of Island No.10 could not be made unless the land-forces coone of the gunboats to run the batteries at Island No.10, and Capt. Walke, U. S.N., who had volunteeoned works on the Tennessee shore, opposite Island No.10, and to save the steamers if he possibly co[13 more...]
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