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hed Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of the intrenched camp of the enemy, on the Cumberland River, on the seventeenth inst., with a portion of the Second and Third brigades, Kinney's battery of artillery, and a battalion of Wolford's cavalments, to remain until the arrival of the regiments in the rear. Having received information, on the evening of the seventeenth, that a large train of wagons, with its escort, was encamped on the Robertsport and Danville road, about six miles froNothing of importance occurred, from the time of my arrival until the morning of the 19th, except a picket skirmish on the 17th. The Fourth Kentucky, the battalion of Michigan engineers, and Wetmore's battery, joined on the 18th. About five and a hwo more regiments arrived from Knoxville, an artillery company with four guns, and Brig.-Gen. W. H. Carroll. On the seventeenth and eighteenth it rained so much that Fishing Creek could not be crossed, and so the Somerset force of several thousan
ntil the morning of the 19th, except a picket skirmish on the 17th. The Fourth Kentucky, the battalion of Michigan engineers, and Wetmore's battery, joined on the 18th. About five and a half o'clock, on the morning of the 19th, the pickets from Wolford's cavalry, encountered the enemy advancing on our camp; retired slowly, and rrovisions enough had been gathered to ration the army with bread, meat, coffee, and sugar for two days--the nineteenth and twentieth. On the afternoon of the eighteenth, two cavalry companies which had been sent out by General Crittenden returned, reporting the position. of the enemy unchanged, and Fishing Creek so full that iof the roads before the Somerset brigade could unite with it, and, if possible, before it could be joined by the reserve from Columbia. On the afternoon of the eighteenth, Gen. Zollicoffer remarked to the writer that the enemy ought to be attacked, and on that evening Gen. Crittenden called a council at his quarters, with Gens. Z
the time of my arrival until the morning of the 19th, except a picket skirmish on the 17th. The Fou five and a half o'clock, on the morning of the 19th, the pickets from Wolford's cavalry, encountere. Schoepf also joined me, on the evening of the 19th, with the Seventeenth, Thirty-first, and Thirtytook in the battle of the Cumberland on the 19th instant. Shortly before seven A. M. Colonel Mason r my command, in the battle fought on the nineteenth inst., at Logan's Farm, Pulaski County, Ky. alf-past 6 o'clock, on the morning of the nineteenth inst., a courier came to our quarters with infoVolunteers together on the morning of the nineteenth inst., about seven o'clock. Led by Acting Lieutt in the action of the Cumberland, on the nineteenth inst. About seven o'clock on the morning of thak so full that it could not be passed on the nineteenth. In view of this state of things, it seems clock in the morning of Sunday last, the nineteenth instant, the battle commenced, the enemy opening
f this place, where I halted the regiment, and the men slept on their arms in the open field. The men at this time were powder-besmeared, tired and hungry, having had nothing to eat since the previous night. On the following morning, the twentieth inst., after our artillery had shelled the enemy's works, by your orders, I moved my regiment to his breastworks, and into his deserted intrenchments, where I have since remained. It may be interesting to state here that our regimental colors, strewed with guns, blankets, coats, haversacks, and every thing else that impeded flight. On our side from twenty to thirty are killed, and from eighty to one hundred wounded, having no prisoners taken that we know of. On the morning of the twentieth, soon after daylight, several of the regiments were moved forward toward the breastworks, and a cannon-ball or two fired over into them; but no answer was made — all was quiet. The regiments moved steadily on and into their fortifications, it
January 1st (search for this): chapter 15
will be remembered that some two months ago, Brig.-Gen. Zollicoffer moved with a portion of his command to Mill Springs, on the southern bank of the Cumberland River, and soon after advanced across .to Camp Beech Grove on the opposite bank, fortifying this camp with earth-works. At Beech Grove he placed five regiments of infantry, ten or twelve pieces of artillery, and several hundred cavalry, and at Mill Springs he had two regiments of infantry and several hundred cavalry. About the first of January, Maj.-Gen. Crittenden arrived and took the command. The enemy in front occupied Somerset with several regiments, and Columbia with an equal force. About the second week of this month two more regiments arrived from Knoxville, an artillery company with four guns, and Brig.-Gen. W. H. Carroll. On the seventeenth and eighteenth it rained so much that Fishing Creek could not be crossed, and so the Somerset force of several thousand could not join the force from Columbia before the tw
January 19th (search for this): chapter 15
the wonderful position of old Zolly, to write you a letter on contraband paper, with a contraband pen and contraband ink. Where shall I begin — what shall I write first? There are incidents enough, if all recounted, to fill a volume; things that took place in this, the most complete victory, and most over-whelming, total overthrow the secession army has yet met with in this rebellion. To begin at the beginning and tell the story straight: Just at daybreak on Sunday morning, the nineteenth of January, sharp firing commenced with the pickets in the same spot where the firing was last Friday night; the long roll beat in the Indiana Tenth, and they formed instantly and marched to the support of their pickets. The Tenth and Kinney's battery were close together, and half a mile in advance of every thing. The battery got ready for action on the instant, and awaited orders. By the way, Standart's battery and Wetmore's four-gun battery were both in park, one on each side of Kinney's b
January 27th (search for this): chapter 15
my regiment were in the engagement, twelve of whom were killed, and thirty-three wounded. I am well satisfied with the conduct of my entire command, during the severe and close engagement in which they took part. Where all behaved so well, I have no desire to make individual distinction. Very respectfully your obedient servant, H. P. Van Cleve, Colonel Commanding Second Min. Volunteers. Thanks to the Tenth Indiana. Adjutant-General's office, Indiana Volunteers, Indianapolis, Jan. 27. General orders, No. 9. His Excellency O. P. Morton, Governor of In diana, in common with the people of said State, hails with pride and gratitude the news of the victory achieved over the rebels in the recent engagement near Somerset, Ky., in which the Tenth Regiment of Indiana volunteers, under Colonel Mahlon D. Manson, so gallantly distinguished themselves. In behalf of the people, he returns heartfelt thanks to the gallant officers and brave men of that regiment, for their alac
January 29th (search for this): chapter 15
to the Northern accounts, which we publish in our telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred and seventy-five, with no statement in regard to the number of prisoners taken. We hear that in addition to baggage, artillery, etc., left on the field, two thousand two hundred head of horses and mules were left behind, and probably captured by the Federals. We are inclined to think this statement an exaggeration. --Tuscumbia (Ala.) Constitution, Jan. 29. Opinions of the rebel press: another Arnold. If the following statement is true, which we find in a correspondence from Nashville to the Memphis Avalanche of the twenty-seventh, Gen. George B. Crittenden, the commander of our forces at Fishing Creek, is a traitor of the deepest dye, and deserves to be hung up to the nearest tree. We sincerely hope that the charges made against Crittenden are groundless, and that the deplorable catastrophe was caused not by treachery but by whisky, w
January 31st (search for this): chapter 15
. Battle told the brigade that they had been sold. The regiment then proceeded to Monticello, and upon their arrival Gen. Crittenden was found at the Houston Hotel, in his bed, deeply intoxicated. He was immediately arrested, and is now a prisoner of war, held by Cols. Stanton, Battle, Stratham, and Newman. The papers discovered are said to reveal the character of our fortifications at Mill Spring, the number of our troops, and the amount of provisions on hand, etc. --Tuscumbia Alabamian, Jan. 31. Letter from an officer in Crittenden's command. on March, Jan. 27, 1862. editors patriot: You have heard long since of the recent fight on Fishing Creek, between our forces and the Federals; consequently, I shall not at this time attempt to give you any of the details, but will do so at my earliest convenience. My object in writing at this time is to defend an innocent and brave man against an unjust, unfounded, and inhuman prejudice, which many of our soldiers and some officer
December 29th (search for this): chapter 15
of their conduct. By command of Brig.-Gen. Buell. James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. General Thomas's report to General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.: Captain: I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the General commanding the department, contained in his communications of the twenty-ninth of December, I reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of the intrenched camp of the enemy, on the Cumberland River, on the seventeenth inst., with a portion of the Second and Third brigades, Kinney's battery of artillery, and a battalion of Wolford's cavalry. The Fourth and Tenth Kentucky, Fourteenth Ohio, and the Eighteenth United States Infantry, being still in the rear, detained by the almost impassable condition of the roads, I determined to halt at this point to await their ar
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