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J. W. Allen (search for this): chapter 15
on both sides, and in moving the wounded to the hospital near the battle-field. A number of flags were taken on the field of battle, and in the intrenchments. They will be forwarded to headquarters as soon as collected together. The enemy's loss, as far as known, is as follows: Brigadier-General Zollicoffer, Lieutenant Baillie Peyton, and one hundred and ninety officers and non-commissioned officers and privates killed. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Carter, Twentieth Tennessee, Lieutenant J. W. Allen, Fifteenth Mississippi, Lieutenant Allan Morse, Sixteenth Alabama, and five officers of the Medical Staff, and eighty-one non-commissioned officers and privates taken prisoners. Lieutenant J. E. Patterson, Twentieth Tennessee, and A. J. Knapp, Fifteenth Mississippi, and sixty-six non-commissioned officers and privates wounded. Making one hundred and ninety-two killed, eighty-nine prisoners not wounded, and sixty-two wounded. A total of killed, wounded, and prisoners of three hund
James Arnold (search for this): chapter 15
r telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred and seventy-five, with no statement in regard to the number of prisoners taken. We hear that in addition to baggage, artillery, etc., left on the field, two thousand two hundred head of horses and mules were left behind, and probably captured by the Federals. We are inclined to think this statement an exaggeration. --Tuscumbia (Ala.) Constitution, Jan. 29. Opinions of the rebel press: another Arnold. If the following statement is true, which we find in a correspondence from Nashville to the Memphis Avalanche of the twenty-seventh, Gen. George B. Crittenden, the commander of our forces at Fishing Creek, is a traitor of the deepest dye, and deserves to be hung up to the nearest tree. We sincerely hope that the charges made against Crittenden are groundless, and that the deplorable catastrophe was caused not by treachery but by whisky, which he is said to drink to such excess that he h
William Battle (search for this): chapter 15
e, Colonel Cummings. Twentieth Tennessee, Captain Battle. Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Captain Stanton. the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, with four guns commanded by Captt be easily filled. Lieut. Baillie Peyton, of Battle's regiment, was killed, and Lieut.-Col. Carter, Gen. Zollicoffer, at the head of portions of Battle's, Newman's, Stanton's, Powell's, and Murray'sissippi regiment was ordered to the right, and Battle's to the left, and immediately afterward, ridifight continued until about eleven o'clock, Col. Battle's and Col. Stratham's regiments bearing the Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is amon Gen. Crittenden, went out with the regiments, Battle's, Stanton's, and Stratham's Fifteenth Mississn returning to the camp, they delivered to Colonel Battle. It was between ten and eleven o'clock whCrittenden rode off hastily to Monticello. Col. Battle told the brigade that they had been sold. [9 more...]
ol. Walthall, in advance, and the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, with four guns commanded by Capt. Rutledge. Then moved the brigade of Gen. Carroll, consisting of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murray, and Powell, with two guns commanded by Capt. McClung. Then moved the Sixteenth Alabama regiment, Col. Wood, as a reserve, and Branner's and McClellan's battalions of cavalry. In advance of the column moved the independent cavalry companies of Capts. Bledsoe and Saunders. In the gray dawn, about six o'clock, two miles from their camp, the pickets of the enemy fired upon our advanced cavalry and wounded one in the arm. Then two companies of the Mississippi regiment were deployed on the right and left of the road as skirmishers, and advanced parallel with the road. On the left, in an open field, was a house near the road, and near by and behind this house was a skirt of woods. While the skirmishers were advancing towards this, the enem
rrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such
J. T. Boyle (search for this): chapter 15
e same department, are entitled to great credit for the prompt manner in which they brought up and supplied the men with cartridges. Commissary-Sergeant David B. Hart, our Rich Mountain guide in the three months service, was present and in the line of his duty. Fife and Drum-Majors Daniel and James Conklin, shouldered muskets and fought valiantly during the early part of the engagement, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their b
In front moved the brigade of Gen. Zollicoffer, consisting of the Fifteenth Mississippi regiment, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Walthall, in advance, and the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, with four guns commanded by Capt. Rutledge. Then moved the brigade of Gen. Carroll, consisting of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murray, and Powell, with two guns commanded by Capt. McClung. Then moved the Sixteenth Alabama regiment, Col. Wood, as a reserve, and Branner's and McClellan's battalions of cavalry. In advance of the column moved the independent cavalry companies of Capts. Bledsoe and Saunders. In the gray dawn, about six o'clock, two miles from their camp, the pickets of the enemy fired upon our advanced cavalry and wounded one in the arm. Then two companies of the Mississippi regiment were deployed on the right and left of the road as skirmishers, and advanced parallel with the road. On the left, in an open field, was a house near the
ifteenth Mississippi in advance, Colonel Walthall. Battery of four guns, Captain Rutledge. Nineteenth Tennessee, Colonel Cummings. Twentieth Tennessee, Captain Battle. Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Captain Stanton. General Carroll. Seventeenth Tennessee, Colonel Newman. Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Colonel Murray. Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Powell. Two guns in rear of infantry, Captain McClung. Sixteenth Alabama, Colonel Wood, (in reserve.) Cavalry battalions in rear. Colonel Brawner on the right. Colonel McClellan on the left. Independent companies in front of the advance regiments. Ambulances and ammunition. Wagons in rear of the whole, and in the order of their regiment. By order of General Crittenden. A. L. Cunningham, A. A. General. Colonel McCook's report. headquarters Third brigade, First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, January 27, 1862. Brigadier-General G. H. Thomas, commanding First Division: sir: I have the honor resp
Joseph C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 15
giment, but continued on duty until the return of the brigade to camp at Logan's Cross Roads. Col. S. S. Fry, Fourth Kentucky regiment, was slightly wounded whilst his regiment was gallantly resisting the advance of the enemy, during which time Gen. Zollicoffer fell from a shot from his (Col. Fry's) pistol, which, no doubt, contributed materially to the discomfiture of the enemy. Capt. G. E. Flynt, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. Abraham C. Gillum, Division Quartermaster; Lieuts. Joseph C. Breckinridge, A. D. C. Lunt, J. B. Jones, Assistant Adjutant-Quartermaster; Mr. J. W. Scully, Quartermaster's clerk; privates, Samuel Letcher, Twenty-first regiment Kentucky volunteers;----Slitch, Fourth Kentucky regiment, rendered me valuable assistance, in carrying orders and conducting the troops to their different positions. Capt. George S. Roper deserves great credit for his perseverance and energy, in forwarding commissary stores as far as the hill where our forces bivouac. In add
John W. Bridgman (search for this): chapter 15
ead-dress and tassel on my head. I give you a copy of two or three of the documents found in the camp. The following was found on a table, in one of the cabins: Col. Spears: We fought you bravely, and desperately but misguidedly. We leave here under pressing circumstances, but do not feel that we are whipped. We will yet succeed, and---- Here the circumstances became so pressing, that the writer did not wait to finish the epistle. Col. Spears supposes the writer to be Major John W. Bridgman, of the Tennessee cavalry. The following was written on a piece of brown paper, with a pencil: Jan. 19, 1861. Fishing Creek. The great battle, at Fishing Creek, took place. Our loss was great; supposed to be eight hundred killed and wounded, and a great many taken prisoners. We will try them again at our breast-work, if they come to us. At the bottom of this paper, upside down, is a name I cannot make out, and then Polasky. Here is another paper, which is evident
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