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H. P. Van Cleve (search for this): chapter 15
ber prisoners. Company H, detached as stated above, had been ordered to join the main body, but failing to find it, fell in with the Second Minnesota, and participated in the action on the left wing of the said regiment. The strength of our regiment during this action was three staff officers, one staff bugler, twenty-one company and ninety-three non — commissioned officers, five hundred and five privates, and eight buglers. Geo. H. Harris, Adjutant Ninth Reg. Ohio Volunteers. Colonel Van Cleve's report. Colonel Robert Me Cook, Ninth Ohio, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Department of the Ohio: sir: I have the honor herewith to submit my report of the part taken by the Second Minnesota regiment in the action of the Cumberland, on the nineteenth inst. About seven o'clock on the morning of that day, and before breakfast, I was informed by Col. Manson, of the Tenth Indiana, commanding the Second brigade of our division, that the enemy were advancing in force, a
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 15
of the engagement, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement
ment, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many in
their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such as those of Orderly-Sergeant Miller, of Company B, and my Orderly-Sergeant, Abraham A. Carter, who took a gun and fought manfully during the intervals that his services were not required by me in despatching orders. But nothing I can
James Conklin (search for this): chapter 15
, and the Rev. Dr. Dougherty, Chaplain of the Tenth regiment, rendered valuable service in their unrelenting attention to the wounded. Quartermaster Oliver S. Rankins, and Nelson B. Smith, of the same department, are entitled to great credit for the prompt manner in which they brought up and supplied the men with cartridges. Commissary-Sergeant David B. Hart, our Rich Mountain guide in the three months service, was present and in the line of his duty. Fife and Drum-Majors Daniel and James Conklin, shouldered muskets and fought valiantly during the early part of the engagement, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and disch
George Cook (search for this): chapter 15
ted above, had been ordered to join the main body, but failing to find it, fell in with the Second Minnesota, and participated in the action on the left wing of the said regiment. The strength of our regiment during this action was three staff officers, one staff bugler, twenty-one company and ninety-three non — commissioned officers, five hundred and five privates, and eight buglers. Geo. H. Harris, Adjutant Ninth Reg. Ohio Volunteers. Colonel Van Cleve's report. Colonel Robert Me Cook, Ninth Ohio, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Department of the Ohio: sir: I have the honor herewith to submit my report of the part taken by the Second Minnesota regiment in the action of the Cumberland, on the nineteenth inst. About seven o'clock on the morning of that day, and before breakfast, I was informed by Col. Manson, of the Tenth Indiana, commanding the Second brigade of our division, that the enemy were advancing in force, and that he was holding them in check, and tha
George B. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 15
n was killed. D — Logan's house. E--Gen. Crittenden and Staff. F — Position of Gen. Carrol order of their regiment. By order of General Crittenden. A. L. Cunningham, A. A. General. Cer, killed the old devil himself,. and maybe Crittenden too, for he has not been heard of since the d cavalry. About the first of January, Maj.-Gen. Crittenden arrived and took the command. The enemfiring at the head of the column, where Generals Crittenden and Zollicoffer sat upon their horses aediately on the announcement of his death Gen. Crittenden in person rode up to the front of the figsincerely hope that the charges made against Crittenden are groundless, and that the deplorable cata night week, Gen. Zollicoffer, ordered by Gen. Crittenden, went out with the regiments, Battle's, Sn o'clock, the enemy being out of sight. Gen. Crittenden then ordered the command to disperse, eve retreat was discussed. All favored it. General Crittenden remarked: Gentlemen, I am here to serve [20 more...]<
t security, to rest our weary limbs, the distance we had come being over ten miles on the direct road, let alone the bushes and underbrush we went through, to say nothing about two or three dress-parades of the Second for somebody's amusement, but not our own, I can assure you. And then the roads and fields were awfully cut up, and mud was plenty, as it had rained a good part of the forenoon. Our men lay down to rest without a mouthful to eat, many of whom had eaten no breakfast; but as Captain Cross said, The man who could not fast two days over Zollicoffer's scalp, was no man at all; and there was no grumbling, as there was necessity for it. However, the teams came up in the night with crackers and bacon. Now here is the summary, so far as I know, up to Sunday night: we are within a mile of Zollicoffer's encampment; Zollicoffer is killed and his forces have been whipped — some two hundred of them being killed and a great many wounded; one of Crittenden's aids, a lieutenant-colon
S. W. Cummings (search for this): chapter 15
Beech Grove, Ky., January 18, 1862. circular. The following will be the orders of march: General Zollicoffer. Fifteenth Mississippi in advance, Colonel Walthall. Battery of four guns, Captain Rutledge. Nineteenth Tennessee, Colonel Cummings. Twentieth Tennessee, Captain Battle. Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Captain Stanton. General Carroll. Seventeenth Tennessee, Colonel Newman. Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Colonel Murray. Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Powell. Two guns in rear he attack! In perfect silence, at midnight, the march began. In front moved the brigade of Gen. Zollicoffer, consisting of the Fifteenth Mississippi regiment, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Walthall, in advance, and the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, with four guns commanded by Capt. Rutledge. Then moved the brigade of Gen. Carroll, consisting of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murray, and Powell, with two guns commanded by Capt. McClung. Then moved t
A. L. Cunningham (search for this): chapter 15
see, Colonel Newman. Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Colonel Murray. Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Powell. Two guns in rear of infantry, Captain McClung. Sixteenth Alabama, Colonel Wood, (in reserve.) Cavalry battalions in rear. Colonel Brawner on the right. Colonel McClellan on the left. Independent companies in front of the advance regiments. Ambulances and ammunition. Wagons in rear of the whole, and in the order of their regiment. By order of General Crittenden. A. L. Cunningham, A. A. General. Colonel McCook's report. headquarters Third brigade, First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, January 27, 1862. Brigadier-General G. H. Thomas, commanding First Division: sir: I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report of the part which my brigade took in the battle of the Cumberland on the 19th instant. Shortly before seven A. M. Colonel Mason informed me that the enemy had driven in his pickets and were approaching in force. Th
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