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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Joseph M. Daniel (search for this): chapter 15
Surgeon C. S. Perkins, and the Rev. Dr. Dougherty, Chaplain of the Tenth regiment, rendered valuable service in their unrelenting attention to the wounded. Quartermaster Oliver S. Rankins, and Nelson B. Smith, of the same department, are entitled to great credit for the prompt manner in which they brought up and supplied the men with cartridges. Commissary-Sergeant David B. Hart, our Rich Mountain guide in the three months service, was present and in the line of his duty. Fife and Drum-Majors Daniel and James Conklin, shouldered muskets and fought valiantly during the early part of the engagement, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, wa
Doc. 16.-the battle of Mill Springs, Ky. this battle is variously known as the battle of Mill Spring, Logan's cross roads, Fishing Creek, and Somerset. Official report of General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky., Jan. 28, 1862. General orders, no. 40. The General commanding has the gratification of announcing the achievement of an important victory, on the nineteenth inst, at Mill Springs, by the troops under Gen. Thomas, over the rebel forces, some twelve thousand strong, under Gen. George B. Crittenden and Gen. Zollicoffer. The defeat of the enemy was thorough and complete, and his loss in killed and wounded was great. Night alone, under cover of which his troops crossed the river from his intrenched camp and dispersed, prevented the capture of his entire force. Fourteen or more pieces of artillery, some fifteen hundred horses and mules, his entire camp equipage, together with wagons, arms, am munition, and other stores to a large
Tim Dodson (search for this): chapter 15
surrounding them on every side. From this hour the battle raged furiously until eleven o'clock at night, at which time the confederates were compelled to abandon their position, leaving upon the field a large lot of provisions, the splendid batteries commanded by Captains Rutledge and McClung, besides camp equipage, baggage, etc. Among those reported killed in addition to the commander of the brigade, are the following: Lieut.-Col. Carter, of Battle's regiment, from Williamson County; Tim Dodson, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon
erving them. Three stand of rebel colors were captured by my regiment. I cannot speak in terms of sufficient praise of the noble and gallant conduct of some of the officers of my regiment. They did their duty, and fought like true veterans. Major A. O. Miller was wherever duty called him, and in the thickest of the fight, cheering on the men. Aiding-Adjutant W. E. Ludlow did his whole duty, and rendered me valuable assistance during the day. Assistant-Surgeon C. S. Perkins, and the Rev. Dr. Dougherty, Chaplain of the Tenth regiment, rendered valuable service in their unrelenting attention to the wounded. Quartermaster Oliver S. Rankins, and Nelson B. Smith, of the same department, are entitled to great credit for the prompt manner in which they brought up and supplied the men with cartridges. Commissary-Sergeant David B. Hart, our Rich Mountain guide in the three months service, was present and in the line of his duty. Fife and Drum-Majors Daniel and James Conklin, shouldere
J. K. Duncan (search for this): chapter 15
ober breath for months. The following is said to be the statement of one of Capt. Duncan's men after the battle: He states that about eleven o'clock Saturday nighptain West, a Union man, lives near the encampment. A number of the members of Duncan's company had been having their washing done at West's. On Saturday, prior to trn army. A negro, Elizabeth, in the afternoon, told the negro-girl attached to Duncan's company that a certain negro (calling him by name) of her master was to go be papers, to the Northern army. The intelligence was conveyed to the members of Duncan's company, who at first disregarded the report, attaching no importance to it. whereupon eight men (among them W. B. Smith) were sent towards the river by Captain Duncan, (Duncan going himself,) in search of the negro. These men had proceeded aDuncan going himself,) in search of the negro. These men had proceeded about four and a half miles, when they met a man driving cattle, who informed them of the direction in which he had seen the negro travelling. The men hastened on to
hich is evidently the result of a council of war, held before this force came across on the north side of the Cumberland: The result of your crossing the river now, will be that you will be repulsed, and lose all the artillery taken over. Estill. Dec. 4, 1861. Another Wild-Cat disaster is all we can look forward to. Fulkerson. We will cross over, and find that the enemy has retired to a place that we will not deem advisable to attack, and then we will return to this encampment. Loring. Estill is a colonel, from Middle--Tennessee. Fulkerson is a major, and one of the big-heads of the secession party, in Tennessee. It seems that there was opposition in the camp, to the move on to this side of the river, but old Zollicoffer, the head devil of the army, ruled, and did come over. Some of these predictions proved to be strictly true; it did turn out to be a Wild-Cat disaster — only worse; and they did lose all their artillery; and, more than all, the old hedevil, Zo
Edwin Ewing (search for this): chapter 15
on, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton, slightly. It is impossible at this moment to sum up the extent of our loss. According to the Northern accounts, which we publish in our telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred and seventy-five, with no statement in regard to the number
Orville Ewing (search for this): chapter 15
ost a brave and noble general, whose place cannot be easily filled. Lieut. Baillie Peyton, of Battle's regiment, was killed, and Lieut.-Col. Carter and Sergt.-Major Orville Ewing, of same regiment, were wounded and taken prisoners, and Adjutant Battle was wounded in the shoulder. Colonel Stanton was wounded in the arm while leadment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are amonOrville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton, slightly. It is impossible at this moment to sum up the extent of our loss. According to the Northern accounts, which we publish in our telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred
G. E. Flynt (search for this): chapter 15
ghteenth United States infantry, were both severely wounded, in the first advance of the Ninth Ohio regiment, but continued on duty until the return of the brigade to camp at Logan's Cross Roads. Col. S. S. Fry, Fourth Kentucky regiment, was slightly wounded whilst his regiment was gallantly resisting the advance of the enemy, during which time Gen. Zollicoffer fell from a shot from his (Col. Fry's) pistol, which, no doubt, contributed materially to the discomfiture of the enemy. Capt. G. E. Flynt, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. Abraham C. Gillum, Division Quartermaster; Lieuts. Joseph C. Breckinridge, A. D. C. Lunt, J. B. Jones, Assistant Adjutant-Quartermaster; Mr. J. W. Scully, Quartermaster's clerk; privates, Samuel Letcher, Twenty-first regiment Kentucky volunteers;----Slitch, Fourth Kentucky regiment, rendered me valuable assistance, in carrying orders and conducting the troops to their different positions. Capt. George S. Roper deserves great credit for his persever
Henry M. Fogg (search for this): chapter 15
with honor. While it is invidious to make separate mention of regiments, the notice of these two, at least, will meet with general approbation in this army. Major Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, and Lieut. Evan Shields, were dangerously wounded. They behaved in the action with approved gallantry. Thus with four thousand menre's old Zollicoffer, cried out several of the regiment in front of him. Kill him! and in an instant their pieces were levelled at his person. At that moment Henry M. Fogg, aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, drew his revolver and fired, killing the person who first recognized Gen. Zollicoffer. With the most perfect coolness, Gen. Zollicofr County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., st
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