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James B. Fry (search for this): chapter 15
the General-in-chief to convey his thanks to Gen. Thomas and his troops for their brilliant victory. No task could be more grateful to him, seconded as it is by his own cordial approbation of their conduct. By command of Brig.-Gen. Buell. James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. General Thomas's report to General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the OhCaptain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.: Captain: I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the General commanding the department, contained in his communications of the twenty-ninth of December, I reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of the intrenched camp of the enemy, on the Cumberland River, on the seventeenth inst., with a portion of the Second and Third brigades, Kinney's battery of artillery, and a battalion of Wolford's cavalry. The Fourth and Tenth Kentucky, Four
n the road, to await the attack, ordering the Fourth Kentucky, (Col. S. S. Fry,) to support him, and then informed me in person that the enemyil the return of the brigade to camp at Logan's Cross Roads. Col. S. S. Fry, Fourth Kentucky regiment, was slightly wounded whilst his regiemy, during which time Gen. Zollicoffer fell from a shot from his (Col. Fry's) pistol, which, no doubt, contributed materially to the discomfir was being executed, the Fourth Kentucky regiment, commanded by Colonel Fry, came up and took position on the left of my left wing, and openn the rear of these batteries, in the Woods. The Fourth Kentucky, Col. Fry, was the next regiment on the road, half a mile in the rear of theThe most important event of the day was the death of Zollicoffer. Col. Fry of the Fourth Kentucky charged up a hill by himself upon a group oof the master-spirits of the rebellion, fell off his horse, dead. Col. Fry was, luckily, unhurt; but his horse was shot through the body, the
n the north side of the Cumberland: The result of your crossing the river now, will be that you will be repulsed, and lose all the artillery taken over. Estill. Dec. 4, 1861. Another Wild-Cat disaster is all we can look forward to. Fulkerson. We will cross over, and find that the enemy has retired to a place that we will not deem advisable to attack, and then we will return to this encampment. Loring. Estill is a colonel, from Middle--Tennessee. Fulkerson is a major, andFulkerson is a major, and one of the big-heads of the secession party, in Tennessee. It seems that there was opposition in the camp, to the move on to this side of the river, but old Zollicoffer, the head devil of the army, ruled, and did come over. Some of these predictions proved to be strictly true; it did turn out to be a Wild-Cat disaster — only worse; and they did lose all their artillery; and, more than all, the old hedevil, Zollicoffer, lost his life. The rout has been complete and total. His whole force is
James George (search for this): chapter 15
ed themselves under fire in a proper soldierly manner, were I to fail to specify some of them it would be great injustice. Lieutenant Andrew S. Burt, (aid-decamp,) of the Eighteenth United States Infantry; Haxter Brooke, private in the Second Minnesota regiment and volunteer aid-de-camp; Major Gustavus Kaemmerling, commanding the Ninth Ohio; Capt. Charles Joseph, Company A, Capt. Frederick Schroeder, Company D, George H. Harris, Adjutant, of the Ninth Ohio regiment; Col. H. P. Van Cleve, James George, Lieut.-Col., Alexander Wilkins, Major, of the Second Minnesota, each displayed great valor and judgment in the discharge of their respective duties-so much so, in my judgment, as to place their country and every honest friend thereof under obligations to them. In conclusion, permit me, sir, to congratulate you on the victory achieved, and allow me to express the hope that your future efforts will be crowned with the same success. Attached you will find the number of the force of my b
Abraham C. Gillum (search for this): chapter 15
y wounded, in the first advance of the Ninth Ohio regiment, but continued on duty until the return of the brigade to camp at Logan's Cross Roads. Col. S. S. Fry, Fourth Kentucky regiment, was slightly wounded whilst his regiment was gallantly resisting the advance of the enemy, during which time Gen. Zollicoffer fell from a shot from his (Col. Fry's) pistol, which, no doubt, contributed materially to the discomfiture of the enemy. Capt. G. E. Flynt, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. Abraham C. Gillum, Division Quartermaster; Lieuts. Joseph C. Breckinridge, A. D. C. Lunt, J. B. Jones, Assistant Adjutant-Quartermaster; Mr. J. W. Scully, Quartermaster's clerk; privates, Samuel Letcher, Twenty-first regiment Kentucky volunteers;----Slitch, Fourth Kentucky regiment, rendered me valuable assistance, in carrying orders and conducting the troops to their different positions. Capt. George S. Roper deserves great credit for his perseverance and energy, in forwarding commissary stores a
John D. Goss (search for this): chapter 15
s, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton, slightly. It is impossible at this moment to sum up the extent of our loss. According to the Northern accounts, which we publish in our telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred and seventy-five, with no statement in regard to the number of prisoners taken. We hear that in addition to baggage, artillery,
James Gray (search for this): chapter 15
lot of provisions, the splendid batteries commanded by Captains Rutledge and McClung, besides camp equipage, baggage, etc. Among those reported killed in addition to the commander of the brigade, are the following: Lieut.-Col. Carter, of Battle's regiment, from Williamson County; Tim Dodson, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton,
nd hold the enemy in check until I could order up the other troops, which were ordered to form immediately, and were marching to the field in ten minutes afterward. The battalion of Michigan engineers, and Company A, (Thirty-eighth Ohio,) Capt. Greenwood, were ordered to remain as guard to the camp. Upon my arrival in the field soon afterward, I found the Tenth Indiana formed in front of their encampment, apparently awaiting orders, and ordered them forward to the support of the Fourth Kees great credit for his perseverance and energy, in forwarding commissary stores as far as the hill where our forces bivouac. In addition to the duties of guarding the camp, Lieut.-Col. A. K. Huston, commanding the Michigan engineers, and Capt. Greenwood, Company A, Thirty-eighth regiment Ohio volunteers, with their command, performed very efficient service, in collecting and burying the dead on both sides, and in moving the wounded to the hospital near the battle-field. A number of flags
Archibald H. Gregory (search for this): chapter 15
s good a position as practicable, I took a stand, and ordered the regiment to fire, which order was instantly obeyed. The firing continued, without cessation, for more than an hour, during which time we engaged three of the enemy's regiments, and held them at bay. The battle was at its hottest, and our ranks were gradually becoming thinned and mutilated, when I perceived a regiment of rebel cavalry attempting to flank me on the right, and an infantry regiment on the left. I commanded Capt. Gregory's company to take position to meet the cavalry on the right, which it did, and opened a galling fire upon them; but they were fast closing in upon us, and I saw myself completely outflanked on the right, and that reinforcements must soon come to my relief or I would be compelled to fall back. I was eventually forced to order my right wing to retire, when, just as my order was being executed, the Fourth Kentucky regiment, commanded by Colonel Fry, came up and took position on the left of
Schuyler Hamilton (search for this): chapter 15
on that the enemy was advancing upon our camp, and almost immediately afterward the firing of our pickets was heard. The long roll quickly brought the Tenth regiment into ranks, and I gave orders to Major Miller to go forward with Company A, Capt. Hamilton, to the support of the picket companies, which order was promptly executed. I soon proceeded, by your order, with the remaining seven companies of my regiment, down the road in the direction of the picket-firing. When I got within seventyin the line of his duty. Fife and Drum-Majors Daniel and James Conklin, shouldered muskets and fought valiantly during the early part of the engagement, after which they were of great service in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battle, where none but the brave and gallant go, and continually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were fou
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