hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 466 0 Browse Search
Doc 320 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 206 6 Browse Search
A. H. Foote 201 9 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 185 3 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 176 4 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 169 5 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 167 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 162 10 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 156 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 661 total hits in 187 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ry, Maj.-Gen. Crittenden arrived and took the command. The enemy in front occupied Somerset with several regiments, and Columbia with an equal force. About the second week of this month two more regiments arrived from Knoxville, an artillery compuch that Fishing Creek could not be crossed, and so the Somerset force of several thousand could not join the force from Columbia before the twentieth. From the face of the country in front of Camp Beech Grove there was very bad range for artillerg section rendered it impossible to transport from Knoxville, a distance of one hundred and thirty miles. The enemy from Columbia commanded the Cumberland River, and only one boat was enabled to come up with supplies from Nashville. With the channele roads before the Somerset brigade could unite with it, and, if possible, before it could be joined by the reserve from Columbia. On the afternoon of the eighteenth, Gen. Zollicoffer remarked to the writer that the enemy ought to be attacked, and o
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
x hundred of my regiment were in the engagement, twelve of whom were killed, and thirty-three wounded. I am well satisfied with the conduct of my entire command, during the severe and close engagement in which they took part. Where all behaved so well, I have no desire to make individual distinction. Very respectfully your obedient servant, H. P. Van Cleve, Colonel Commanding Second Min. Volunteers. Thanks to the Tenth Indiana. Adjutant-General's office, Indiana Volunteers, Indianapolis, Jan. 27. General orders, No. 9. His Excellency O. P. Morton, Governor of In diana, in common with the people of said State, hails with pride and gratitude the news of the victory achieved over the rebels in the recent engagement near Somerset, Ky., in which the Tenth Regiment of Indiana volunteers, under Colonel Mahlon D. Manson, so gallantly distinguished themselves. In behalf of the people, he returns heartfelt thanks to the gallant officers and brave men of that regiment, for
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
er fire in a proper soldierly manner, were I to fail to specify some of them it would be great injustice. Lieutenant Andrew S. Burt, (aid-decamp,) of the Eighteenth United States Infantry; Haxter Brooke, private in the Second Minnesota regiment and volunteer aid-de-camp; Major Gustavus Kaemmerling, commanding the Ninth Ohio; Capt. Charles Joseph, Company A, Capt. Frederick Schroeder, Company D, George H. Harris, Adjutant, of the Ninth Ohio regiment; Col. H. P. Van Cleve, James George, Lieut.-Col., Alexander Wilkins, Major, of the Second Minnesota, each displayed great valor and judgment in the discharge of their respective duties-so much so, in my judgment, as to place their country and every honest friend thereof under obligations to them. In conclusion, permit me, sir, to congratulate you on the victory achieved, and allow me to express the hope that your future efforts will be crowned with the same success. Attached you will find the number of the force of my brigade engaged, a
were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such as those of Orderly-Sergeant Miller, of Company B, and my Orderly-Sergeant, Abraham A. Carter, who took a gun and fought manfully during the intervals that his services were not required by me in despatching orders. But nothing I can say, will add to the well-merited laurels already on the
Tim Dodson (search for this): chapter 15
surrounding them on every side. From this hour the battle raged furiously until eleven o'clock at night, at which time the confederates were compelled to abandon their position, leaving upon the field a large lot of provisions, the splendid batteries commanded by Captains Rutledge and McClung, besides camp equipage, baggage, etc. Among those reported killed in addition to the commander of the brigade, are the following: Lieut.-Col. Carter, of Battle's regiment, from Williamson County; Tim Dodson, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon
ually pressed forward with their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such as those of Orderly-Sergeant Miller, of Company B, and my Orderly-Sergeant, Abraham A. Carter, who took a gun and fought manfully during the intervals that his services were not required by me in despatching
W. H. Carroll (search for this): chapter 15
gan's house. E--Gen. Crittenden and Staff. F — Position of Gen. Carroll. G--Capt. McClarg's (Rebel) Battery. H — Pickets of (Rebele, Captain Battle. Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Captain Stanton. General Carroll. Seventeenth Tennessee, Colonel Newman. Twenty-eighth Tennesd attending to the wounded. Capts. Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll and Shorter, the three young tigers, were through the entire battld from Knoxville, an artillery company with four guns, and Brig.-Gen. W. H. Carroll. On the seventeenth and eighteenth it rained so much thenden called a council at his quarters, with Gens. Zollicoffer and Carroll and the colonels of regiments and captains of artillery and lieuteour guns commanded by Capt. Rutledge. Then moved the brigade of Gen. Carroll, consisting of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murrahe battle raged. He sent for reinforcements, and the brigade of Gen. Carroll was ordered up. When, in another moment, it was announced that h
James Gray (search for this): chapter 15
lot of provisions, the splendid batteries commanded by Captains Rutledge and McClung, besides camp equipage, baggage, etc. Among those reported killed in addition to the commander of the brigade, are the following: Lieut.-Col. Carter, of Battle's regiment, from Williamson County; Tim Dodson, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton,
Baillie Peyton (search for this): chapter 15
of Mill Spring, Ky. a--Capt. Standart's (Union) battery. B--Capt. Wetmore's (Union) Battery. C — Place where Baillie Peyton was killed. D — Logan's house. E--Gen. Crittenden and Staff. F — Position of Gen. Carroll. G--Capt. McClasoon as collected together. The enemy's loss, as far as known, is as follows: Brigadier-General Zollicoffer, Lieutenant Baillie Peyton, and one hundred and ninety officers and non-commissioned officers and privates killed. Lieutenant-Colonel Win their camp, to be about one thousand. We lost a brave and noble general, whose place cannot be easily filled. Lieut. Baillie Peyton, of Battle's regiment, was killed, and Lieut.-Col. Carter and Sergt.-Major Orville Ewing, of same regiment, were iamson County; Tim Dodson, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-serg<
their men when the battle raged the hottest, and rebels were found most plenty. Capt. Vanarsdall, of Co. B, was present, and discharged his duty faithfully, until the right wing was drawn off. Lieutenants Cobb, Coben, McAdams, Van Natts, Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieut. McAdams fell while nobly leading on his men. Lieut. Bush commanded Company G, and quite distinguished himself. Second Lieuts. Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Miller, Stall, Simpson, Scott and Wilds, fully merit all that can be said in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and privates that were present during the engagement. Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such as those of Orderly-Sergeant Miller, of Company B, and my Orderly-Sergeant, Abraham A. Carter, who took a gun and fought manfully during the intervals that his services were not required by me in despatching orders. But nothing I can
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...