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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
he enemy was completely routed, merits and receives commendation. The purpose of this war is to attack, pursue, and destroy a rebellious enemy, and to deliver the country from danger menaced by traitors. Alacrity, daring, courageous spirit, and patriotic zeal, on all occasions and under every circumstance, are expected from the army of the United States. In the prompt and spirited movements and daring battle of Mill Springs, the nation will realize its hopes, and the people of the United States will rejoice to honor every soldier and officer who proves his courage by charging with the bayonet and storming intrenchments, or in the blaze of the enemy's fire. By order of the President. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. A National account. A correspondent gives the following detailed account of this battle: Zollicoffer's (late) encampment, Jan. 20, 1862. Here I sit in a cedar log cabin, inside the intrenchments of the wonderful position of old Zolly, to write
Gainsboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
had appeared, the quitting of this portion of Kentucky had been gravely considered and almost determined upon, and in a few days would have been compelled. It was impossible to move further into Kentucky, from the barrenness of the mountains between that point and the Blue Grass; and all the counties on the left and right, and the northern counties of East-Tennessee, were too poor to support the army one day. With a vastly superior force attacking, the movement to the Cumberland River, at Gainsboro, a point of supply, was precipitated, and to this Gen. Crittenden is moving with short days' marches. From this point, if the enemy should advance into East-Tennessee, an attack could be made on his flank and rear, while passing through the hilly and barren region of Kentucky, towards Knoxville and the railroad. I have thus briefly sketched our army movements for the last few days. Victory does not gleam upon our banners, and we may not receive the loud plaudits which it brings, but i
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Doc. 16.-the battle of Mill Springs, Ky. this battle is variously known as the battle of Mill Spring, Logan's cross roads, Fishing Creek, and Somerset. Official report of General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky., Jan. 28, 1862. General orders, no. 40. The General commanding has the gratification of announcing the achievement of an important victory, on the nineteenth inst, at Mill Springs, by the troops under Gen. Thomas, over the rebel forces, soA. G., Chief of Staff. General Thomas's report to General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.: Captain: I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the General commanding the department, contained in his communications of the twenty-ninth of December, I reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
river to the enemy, on Saturday night, at about ten o'clock. Mr. Smith, our informant, was one of the persons who captured the negro. The story runs thus: A Captain West, a Union man, lives near the encampment. A number of the members of Duncan's company had been having their washing done at West's. On Saturday, prior to the battle, Gen. Crittenden dined with West. He gave to West some papers, which were to be transmitted across the river, by a negro, to the Northern army. A negro, Elizabeth, in the afternoon, told the negro-girl attached to Duncan's company that a certain negro (calling him by name) of her master was to go beyond the river that night, with papers, to the Northern army. The intelligence was conveyed to the members of Duncan's company, who at first disregarded the report, attaching no importance to it. But the report was emphasized by the two negroes (the girl of Capt. West and the negro of the company) visiting the camp together and repeating it, whereupon ei
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
under Colonel Mahlon D. Manson, so gallantly distinguished themselves. In behalf of the people, he returns heartfelt thanks to the gallant officers and brave men of that regiment, for their alacrity, courage, and brave exertions in sustaining the fair fame of our arms, and especially the proud name of Indiana volunteers. By order of the Commander-in-chief, Laz. Noble, Adjutant-General of Indiana. President Lincoln's order. Headquarters of the army, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, Jan. 22, 1862. The following orders, received from the War Department, are published to the army: war Department, Jan. 22, 1862. The President, Commander-in-chief of the army and navy, has received information of a brilliant victory achieved by the United States forces over a large body of armed traitors and rebels at Mill Springs, in the State of Kentucky. He returns thanks to the gallant officers and soldiers who won that victory; and when the official reports shall be re
Mill Springs (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
nouncing the achievement of an important victory, on the nineteenth inst, at Mill Springs, by the troops under Gen. Thomas, over the rebel forces, some twelve thousan the Somerset and Mill Springs road comes into the main road from my camp to Mill Springs, and a picket of cavalry some distance in advance of the infantry. Generadjutant General. Lieut.-Col. Kise's report. camp opposite Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., Jan. 23, 1862. Col. M. D. Manson, Commander 2d Brigade, 1st Divisy the United States forces over a large body of armed traitors and rebels at Mill Springs, in the State of Kentucky. He returns thanks to the gallant officers and wo months ago, Brig.-Gen. Zollicoffer moved with a portion of his command to Mill Springs, on the southern bank of the Cumberland River, and soon after advanced acrosntry, ten or twelve pieces of artillery, and several hundred cavalry, and at Mill Springs he had two regiments of infantry and several hundred cavalry. About the fir
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
verty of the intervening section rendered it impossible to transport from Knoxville, a distance of one hundred and thirty miles. The enemy from Columbia commanded the Cumberland River, and only one boat was enabled to come up with supplies from Nashville. With the channel of communication closed, the position became untenable without attack. Only corn could be obtained for the horses and mules, and this in such small quantities that often cavalry companies were sent out on unshod horses whichd by the Federals. We are inclined to think this statement an exaggeration. --Tuscumbia (Ala.) Constitution, Jan. 29. Opinions of the rebel press: another Arnold. If the following statement is true, which we find in a correspondence from Nashville to the Memphis Avalanche of the twenty-seventh, Gen. George B. Crittenden, the commander of our forces at Fishing Creek, is a traitor of the deepest dye, and deserves to be hung up to the nearest tree. We sincerely hope that the charges made a
Creek (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
in one of the cabins: Col. Spears: We fought you bravely, and desperately but misguidedly. We leave here under pressing circumstances, but do not feel that we are whipped. We will yet succeed, and---- Here the circumstances became so pressing, that the writer did not wait to finish the epistle. Col. Spears supposes the writer to be Major John W. Bridgman, of the Tennessee cavalry. The following was written on a piece of brown paper, with a pencil: Jan. 19, 1861. Fishing Creek. The great battle, at Fishing Creek, took place. Our loss was great; supposed to be eight hundred killed and wounded, and a great many taken prisoners. We will try them again at our breast-work, if they come to us. At the bottom of this paper, upside down, is a name I cannot make out, and then Polasky. Here is another paper, which is evidently the result of a council of war, held before this force came across on the north side of the Cumberland: The result of your crossin
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ly known as the battle of Mill Spring, Logan's cross roads, Fishing Creek, and Somerset. Official report of General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Ohito General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarterth Indiana, and Wolford's cavalry, at a point where the roads fork, leading to Somerset, I found the enemy advancing through a cornfield, and evidently endeavoring toport. headquarters Third brigade, First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, January 27, 1862. Brigadier-General G. H. Thomas, commanding First Division: news of the victory achieved over the rebels in the recent engagement near Somerset, Ky., in which the Tenth Regiment of Indiana volunteers, under Colonel Mahlon D.aj.-Gen. Crittenden arrived and took the command. The enemy in front occupied Somerset with several regiments, and Columbia with an equal force. About the second
Pulaski (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ounded. I am, respectfully, yours, R. L. Mccook, Commanding Third Brigade, First Division. Martin Bruner, A. A. Adjutant General. Lieut.-Col. Kise's report. camp opposite Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., Jan. 23, 1862. Col. M. D. Manson, Commander 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Department of Ohio: Sir: I have the honor to report to you the part taken by the Tenth Indiana regiment of volunteers under my command, in the battle fought on the nineteenth inst., at Logan's Farm, Pulaski County, Ky. On the evening of the eighteenth inst, in accordance with your order, I sent out as pickets Companies K and I, Capts. Shorter and Perkins, and had them posted on the road leading to the fortifications of the enemy on Cumberland River, distance about twelve miles. Major A. O. Miller, who posted the pickets, stationed Company I one mile from our camp, and Company K three hundred yards beyond. The latter company received instructions to fall back to Capt. Perkins if attacked. At a
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