hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 466 0 Browse Search
Doc 320 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 206 6 Browse Search
A. H. Foote 201 9 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 185 3 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 176 4 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 169 5 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 167 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 162 10 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 156 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 276 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Elliott's Mill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
heard a report. And still further to insure our safety, I placed strong pickets above, at Hayworth's bridge, instructing the officer in command to remove some of its plank, so as to render it temporarily impassable. Admonished by the reported advance of the enemy and the exposure of my left flank for its whole length, during the march next day, I despatched a courier, during the night of the nineteenth, to communicate with our forces at Fort Jefferson, and to suggest that the pass at Elliott's Mill should be occupied by an adequate force, to prevent my return to Fort Jefferson from being cut off. The courier returned with a message from Colonel Marsh, commanding the Twentieth Illinois, informing me that all our forces, except mine and his own, had embarked for Cairo; but that he would remain and hold the pass until I came up, unless otherwise ordered. At seven o'clock in the morning of the twentieth, the main body of my forces moved forward on the direct road to Fort Jefferson, th
Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
th, marched on the morning of the tenth to Fort Jefferson, Capt. Stewart with his company being in tforces, conveyed by transports, arrived at Fort Jefferson on the same day, tenth,) and encamped awaimiles, and returning by Elliott's Mills to Fort Jefferson, nine miles. This reconnoissance was made d by Putney's Bend and Elliott's Mills, to Fort Jefferson, communicating with and being joined by th explored the different roads leading from Fort Jefferson to Blandville, and selected a strong positeteenth, to communicate with our forces at Fort Jefferson, and to suggest that the pass at Elliott'san adequate force, to prevent my return to Fort Jefferson from being cut off. The courier returned wforces moved forward on the direct road to Fort Jefferson, the Twenty-ninth, with a section of Schwaear of the column and moving on with it to Fort Jefferson. During the exposure of this day's march,es of Dresser's battery, having arrived at Fort Jefferson by one o'clock, were immediately embarked
Wickliffe (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s companies of cavalry, attached to regiments; Schwartz's cavalry company, attached to my brigade, and five companies of Col. T. Lyle Dickey's Fourth regiment of cavalry, numbering of infantry, three thousand nine hundred and ninety-two, of cavalry one thousand and sixty-one, and of artillery one hundred and thirty-nine, rank and file, all under my command, and all Illinois volunteers, except Schwartz's battery of light artillery. The cavalry, which had crossed the river and encamped at Fort Holt, on the morning of the ninth, marched on the morning of the tenth to Fort Jefferson, Capt. Stewart with his company being in the advance. On arriving he determined to take in custody all persons found in that place, and immediately sent forward pickets to guard the pass at Elliott's Mills and other approaches from Columbus. The remainder of the forces, conveyed by transports, arrived at Fort Jefferson on the same day, tenth,) and encamped awaiting further orders. On the eleventh I o
Weston, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nth I ordered a reconnoissance east to Blandville, by the Hill road, eight miles, thence north on the road to Columbus to Weston's, five miles, and returning by Elliott's Mills to Fort Jefferson, nine miles. This reconnoissance was made by Capt. Stewo the bridge across Mayfield Creek, at Hayworth's Mill, three miles above Blandville. On the fifteenth, we advanced to Weston's — the Fourth cavalry and Dollin's company, under command of Lieut.-Col. McCulloch, making an early movement southwest, at Jackson, Beauregard, New — Madrid and other places. Milburn is reproached as a Union town by the rebels. Joined at Weston's by the Seventh Illinois, (Col. Cook,) our whole force encamped for the night, in line of battle, ten miles from Columbu column, except the Seventh Illinois volunteers, moved forward over icy roads toward Milburn, a small town southeast from Weston's, and eight miles distant, reaching Milburn about twelve M. The head of the column passed through the town on the road t
Camp Beauregard (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
he expedition which left Cairo, on the tenth inst., under order to penetrate the interior of Kentucky in the neighborhood of Columbus and towards Mayfield and Camp Beauregard. The expedition consisted of the Tenth, Eighteenth, part of the Twenty-fifth, the Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first and Forty-eighth regiments of infanas it had been previously explained to me, I here manoeuvred my forces so as to leave the enemy in doubt whether my purpose was to attack Columbus, march upon Camp Beauregard, or to destroy the railroad leading from Columbus to Union City, and to awaken apprehensions for the safety of each. While the rear of the column was stilley, with the Fourth cavalry, made a demonstration some five miles in a westerly dircection, on the road from Milburn to Columbus, and there again learned that Camp Beauregard was broken up, and that the enemy had retired within his intrenchments at Columbus. And, soon after, I learned that he had destroyed the railroad bridge acro
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
gain learned that Camp Beauregard was broken up, and that the enemy had retired within his intrenchments at Columbus. And, soon after, I learned that he had destroyed the railroad bridge across the Obion, which if true, must be attributed to a fear that it was my intention to seize and control the railroad in the rear of Columbus. Sending forward Captain Wemple with his company of the Fourth cavalry to Mayfield, I communicated with General Smith, commanding the columns that marched from Paducah, placing him in possession of a dispatch from Brig.-Gen. Grant, and giving him information of the report that Camp Beauregard had been abandoned. Capt. Wemple, with his command, joined me the next day. On the next day our whole force advanced north eight miles to Lovelaceville, throwing forward strong pickets to guard the approach from Columbus by Hayworth's bridge. On the eighteenth my command was marched in two columns, by different roads, in a westerly direction, and encamped for
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nt southwest, in the direction of Columbus, and repeating a near approach to that place, while Capt. Stewart, with his company, pushed a reconnoissance, eight miles, quite to Milburn, taking the town by surprise and picking up a man just from Columbus, from whom he derived much valuable information respecting the condition of the rebel force at that point. He learned from this source that our demonstrations toward Columbus had excited alarm, and induced the enemy to call in his forces at Jackson, Beauregard, New — Madrid and other places. Milburn is reproached as a Union town by the rebels. Joined at Weston's by the Seventh Illinois, (Col. Cook,) our whole force encamped for the night, in line of battle, ten miles from Columbus, taking a strong position, commanding the approaches to that place by two roads which intersect the road leading to Putney's Bend and Elliott's Mills to Milburn. Brig.-Gen. Grant, commanding the various forces in the field, came up with us at this point
Mayfield (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
wing report of the expedition which left Cairo, on the tenth inst., under order to penetrate the interior of Kentucky in the neighborhood of Columbus and towards Mayfield and Camp Beauregard. The expedition consisted of the Tenth, Eighteenth, part of the Twenty-fifth, the Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first and Forty-eighth rrn, a small town southeast from Weston's, and eight miles distant, reaching Milburn about twelve M. The head of the column passed through the town on the road to Mayfield, about two miles, and halted — a portion of the column resting in the town. Looking to the object of the expedition, so far as it had been previously explained r that it was my intention to seize and control the railroad in the rear of Columbus. Sending forward Captain Wemple with his company of the Fourth cavalry to Mayfield, I communicated with General Smith, commanding the columns that marched from Paducah, placing him in possession of a dispatch from Brig.-Gen. Grant, and giving h
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Doc. 17.-the Cairo expedition. Official report of Gen; McClernand. headquarters, District of Cairo, Cairo, ill., January 24. Major-Gen. Henry W. Halleck, Commanding Department of Missouri: sir: Being in temporary command of this district, it becomes my duty to submit the following report of the expedition which left Cairo, on the tenth inst., under order to penetrate the interior of Kentucky in the neighborhood of Columbus and towards Mayfield and Camp Beauregard. The expedition consisted of the Tenth, Eighteenth, part of the Twenty-fifth, the Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first and Forty-eighth regiments of infantry, Schwartz and Dresser's batteries of light artillery, Dollin's, O'Harnett's and Carmichael's companies of cavalry, attached to regiments; Schwartz's cavalry company, attached to my brigade, and five companies of Col. T. Lyle Dickey's Fourth regiment of cavalry, numbering of infantry, three thousand nine hundred and ninety-two, of cavalry one thousand and
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Cairo, the five days supply of rations and forage directed by the commanding officer of the district. Hence the necessity of an early resort to other sources of supply. None other presented but to quarter on the enemy or to purchase from loyal citizens. I accordingly resorted to both expedients as I had opportunity In some cases finding live-stock, provisions, forage, etc., the owners of which had abandoned it and gone into the rebel camp, I took and appropriated it to the use of the United States without hesitation. In other cases I purchased from loyal citizens such supplies as were indispensable, and caused certificates to be issued, charging the Government for the purchase of the articles thus obtained. By these means of supply, resorted to from the necessities of the case, substantial economy was practised, in saving to the Government, in supplies and transportation, more than the full value for the five days named. The reconnaissance thus made completed a march of one
1 2 3 4 5 6