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Milford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Wounded. Co. A, Corporal H. E. Brooks, in ankle, Worcester; C. S. Bartlett, arm shattered, do.; S. S. Dresser, flesh wound, leg, do.; H. F. Knox, slightly, neck, Holden; D. B. Bigelow, flesh, leg, Worcester. Co. B, Edwin F. Pond, wrist, Milford. Co. C, Corporal J. P. Burke, head, Boston; A. D. Condon, seriously, South-Boston; Wm. Chafee; Worcester; Chas. Conklin, seriously, Hopkinton; Geo. J. Fayerweather, Westboro; Edward R. Graton, seriously, Leicester; A. H. Holman, North-Brookfihendon; Geo. W. Rice, leg, Fitchburgh. Co. G, Christian Class, leg, Clinton; Christopher Lenhandt, hand, do.; Baptist Reno, breast, Douglas; Ferdinand Swan, hand, Clinton; Geo. Vetter, arm and breast, do.; Daniel Williams, left arm shot away, Milford. Co. H, Second Lieut. N. H. Foster, left elbow, N. Brookfield; Corporal Randall Mann, supposed mortally, Leicester; George E. Kent, do.; H. H. Ware; W. H. Endith, Princeton. Co. I, John S. Brown, head, Orange; W. L. Wheeler, do., Royalton;
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
. In the medical department of the rebel forces several prisoners were made. Among them are Dr. Walter Coles, Surgeon-in-chief of the post. Dr. Coles was two years resident physician to Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Busby, of Raleigh, N. C., and his assistant, Dr. A. T. Gordon, of the Wise Legion. Dr. R. H. Worthington, Murfreesboro, of the Thirty-first North-Carolina regiment. These gentlemen said they had about twenty-five wounded in all, in their hospital. Lieut. S. C. Kinney, of Staunton, Va., an officer of the engineeer corps, was also among the prisoners at this house. The wounded rebels were carried about two miles to the rear, to a farm-house on the eastern shore, at Shallowbag Bay. The following were among the number: O. Jennings Wise, captain in the Fifty-ninth Virginia regiment, (Wise's Legion,) wounded four times; once in a boat in which he was being taken to Nag's Head. He has since died. He is a son of Gov. Wise, of Virginia. E. Allen Quigley, Co. K, W
Croatan Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ably. The low marshy shore of the mainland, as we approach the entrance to Croatan Sound, is clearly seen through a glass, and the white-barked cypress trees distinugh Roanoke Inlet without extreme danger. on board the S. R. Spaulding, Croatan Sound, N. C., Feb. 7. The small tugs, J. P. Levy, Champion and Alert, acted last nduties required of these officers were to lie at anchor off the entrance of Croatan Sound, and to keep a sharp look-out for hostile craft from within. Precautions whe inlet. Proceeding to the bombardment.on board the S. R. Spaulding, Croatan Sound, N. C., Feb. 7. All our preparations having been made by ten o'clock, the gus ship, moved forward, and were soon inside the narrow passage leading into Croatan Sound, known as Roanoke Inlet. The mainland juts eastward, forming a point of marshy land at the southern extremity of Croatan Sound, which forms the only navigable water leading past Roanoke Island. A small marshy island forms the eastern boun
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
and bravery, and so with all of our regiments. Massachusetts may well be proud of the troops she has sent int much down in the mouth to find out we came from Massachusetts. They said they thought we could not fight, bM. V. Order of Governor Andrew. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, headquarters, Boston, March 1, 1862. eld. These worthy sons and heroic soldiers of Massachusetts, in the hour of their triumph, dearly bought, oflating and thanking in the name of the People of Massachusetts, the Twenty-first, the Twenty-third and the Twenthird Massachusetts, Col. Kurtz; Twenty-seveneth Massachusetts, Col. Lee, and the Tenth Connecticut, Col. Russewhen Lieut.-Col. Maggi planted the white flag of Massachusetts on the work. Hawkins's Zouaves next came dashinbrigade, at the head of which the Twenty-fourth, Massachusetts marched, as they were fresh, having been landed Men came by with stretchers, carrying the brave Massachusetts boys, frightful with their bleeding wounds. We
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ment. His name is Capt. L. S. Johnson. A memorandum, found in the enemy's works, shows the strength of the rebel position at Roanoke Island: In batteries,36 In the naval squadron,11--47 On the Curlew,2 Sea Bird,2 Raleigh,1 Commodore Lynch,2 Fanny,2 Post Boy,2 Three other vessels are known to be at other points on the sound, whose force is not given. Five of these guns are rifled. The following letter, in lead-pencil, was found within the work which was bombarded: R. I., February 7th, 1862. dear sir: The enemy are in sight of our battery, and have already twenty-three steamers and twenty-six transports moored this side of the marshes. We are all ready for them, and expect to give them a good thrashing, and send them home to their work. The engagement will certainly be a long and desperate one, but our cause is good. God being, as I firmly believe, on our side, will give us the victory. With much respect, your obedient servant, Sergeant W. E. Vaug
Westborough (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Suter, Oxford. Co. F, Levi Ball, Gardner; Thomas Kelly, N. E. Village. Wounded. Co. A, Corporal H. E. Brooks, in ankle, Worcester; C. S. Bartlett, arm shattered, do.; S. S. Dresser, flesh wound, leg, do.; H. F. Knox, slightly, neck, Holden; D. B. Bigelow, flesh, leg, Worcester. Co. B, Edwin F. Pond, wrist, Milford. Co. C, Corporal J. P. Burke, head, Boston; A. D. Condon, seriously, South-Boston; Wm. Chafee; Worcester; Chas. Conklin, seriously, Hopkinton; Geo. J. Fayerweather, Westboro; Edward R. Graton, seriously, Leicester; A. H. Holman, North-Brookfield; Samuel Hall, groin, Uxbridge; J. A. McKinstry, Southbridge; T. N. Magee, Douglas; Cyprian K. Stratton, Worcester; G. W. Williams, Southboro. Co. D, Capt A. H. Foster, eye, Worcester. Co. E, Corporals John Howell, leg; Worcester; Dennis Sheehan, side, do.; Thomas McKeon, wrist, do.; Privates Peter Brady, stomach, do.; Ephraim Smith, shoulder, do.; James Mitchell, thigh, do. Co. F. John A. Gilchrist, jaw, Lunenb
Leicester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Co. B, Edwin F. Pond, wrist, Milford. Co. C, Corporal J. P. Burke, head, Boston; A. D. Condon, seriously, South-Boston; Wm. Chafee; Worcester; Chas. Conklin, seriously, Hopkinton; Geo. J. Fayerweather, Westboro; Edward R. Graton, seriously, Leicester; A. H. Holman, North-Brookfield; Samuel Hall, groin, Uxbridge; J. A. McKinstry, Southbridge; T. N. Magee, Douglas; Cyprian K. Stratton, Worcester; G. W. Williams, Southboro. Co. D, Capt A. H. Foster, eye, Worcester. Co. E, Corporals John ist Reno, breast, Douglas; Ferdinand Swan, hand, Clinton; Geo. Vetter, arm and breast, do.; Daniel Williams, left arm shot away, Milford. Co. H, Second Lieut. N. H. Foster, left elbow, N. Brookfield; Corporal Randall Mann, supposed mortally, Leicester; George E. Kent, do.; H. H. Ware; W. H. Endith, Princeton. Co. I, John S. Brown, head, Orange; W. L. Wheeler, do., Royalton; S. F. Jillson, thigh; A. N. Cobleigh, leg. Co. K, Samuel Thurston, leg, Worcester; Edwin F. Pratt, leg, Holden; F
Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
mong the prisoners at this house. The wounded rebels were carried about two miles to the rear, to a farm-house on the eastern shore, at Shallowbag Bay. The following were among the number: O. Jennings Wise, captain in the Fifty-ninth Virginia regiment, (Wise's Legion,) wounded four times; once in a boat in which he was being taken to Nag's Head. He has since died. He is a son of Gov. Wise, of Virginia. E. Allen Quigley, Co. K, Wise Legion, slightly wounded. J. T. Sloan, of Salisbury, Roanoke County, N. C., a member of the Eighth North--Carolina regiment, wounded in the arm. George Groves, Wise Legion, in the head. James Groves, Wise Legion. James Kay, Wise Legion, badly. Six others lay wounded in one room, and five or six were being operated on in the kitchen of the house used for the hospital. One wounded man lay in the same room with Capt. Wise, and several up-stairs. The body of Wm. B. Selden was found within the field-work pierced through the head
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
n was taken by the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts and maintained under a terrible fire from the enemy's battery, until the forty rounds of ball-cartridge distributed to the men were exhausted, when they were relieved by the Tenth Connecticut. The Connecticut men maintained this position with the fortitude of veteran troops. The movements of our flank columns of attack had not yet attracted the attention of the enemy. After their most advanced skirmishers had been driven in by our men, another ill on we steadily went, cheering. A gunboat came up and sent a shell howling like a fiend through the woods. The bayonet glimmers departed. Ashore, the first American flag was carried by a Massachusetts regiment, but the proud motto of old Connecticut, Qui Trans Sust., was the next to follow. Three companies of our regiment, viz.: A, Capt. Pardee; D, Capt. Coit; and H, Capt. Leggett, were among the first landed; also a part of company B, Capt. Otis. At once I was ordered forward into a
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ble of accommodating five thousand men very comfortably. We immediately took possession of their arms, equipments, ammunition and stores. We have captured two hundred and thirty commissioned officers and forty-four companies — about three thousand prisoners, with three thousand stand of arms and equipments, and two or three large magazines full of ammunition. We have the flower of the chivalry here; they come from Texas, (the famous Texan Rangers,) North-Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Mississippi, and they look as if they felt very much down in the mouth to find out we came from Massachusetts. They said they thought we could not fight, but they found out we could fight like devils. General Parke's brigade took and have possession of one of the forts that was not fought, and it is a fine work, and with Yankees in it cannot be taken; but they surrendered without firing a gun. Everything upon the island is now in our possession — Hurrah! The gunboats have since gone up the river
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