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ware of what had taken place, pressed forward to the hoped for consummation of the march. But few miles had been traversed, however, when the evidences of a hasty retreat became so apparent that all were convinced that the game had flown. The object of the march having been thus thwarted, an early return to our camp at Paintsville became our aim, and we accomplished it at the dawn. A harder march was, I venture say, never endured by troops in the same length of time. At nine A. M. on the eighth, the Fortieth and Wolford's cavalry joined us, raising our effective force to about twenty-four hundred, after deducting Ball's cavalry, which, in obedience to orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detailed from the Forty-second and Fortieth Ohio, and Fourteenth Kentucky each three hundred men, and from the Twenty-second Kentucky two hundred men, and taking the immediate command, supported, however, by Colonel Craner of the Forti
onvinced that the game had flown. The object of the march having been thus thwarted, an early return to our camp at Paintsville became our aim, and we accomplished it at the dawn. A harder march was, I venture say, never endured by troops in the same length of time. At nine A. M. on the eighth, the Fortieth and Wolford's cavalry joined us, raising our effective force to about twenty-four hundred, after deducting Ball's cavalry, which, in obedience to orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detailed from the Forty-second and Fortieth Ohio, and Fourteenth Kentucky each three hundred men, and from the Twenty-second Kentucky two hundred men, and taking the immediate command, supported, however, by Colonel Craner of the Fortieth, and Major Burke of the Fourteenth, and detaching Colonel Wolford's and Major McLaughlin's cavalry up Jennie's Creek, marched up the river road leading to Prestonburg. Early on the morning of the tent
orted, however, by Colonel Craner of the Fortieth, and Major Burke of the Fourteenth, and detaching Colonel Wolford's and Major McLaughlin's cavalry up Jennie's Creek, marched up the river road leading to Prestonburg. Early on the morning of the tenth, Colonel Sheldon of the Forty-second Ohio, in command at the camp, received a dispatch from Colonel Garfield stating that he had found the enemy, and asking reenforcements. In compliance with the order, at six A. M. on the tenth, Colonel Sheldontenth, Colonel Sheldon marched with eight hundred men, and all the day they eagerly pressed their weary way. As Colonel Garfield had stated, he had found the enemy two miles from Prestonburg, on Middle Creek, in a chosen position among the hills, with between four and five thousand men and four pieces of artillery. The Fifth Virginia regiment, Colonel Trigg, armed with Mississippi rifles, Colonel John S. Williams's Kentucky regiment, Colonel Moore's Kentucky regiment, armed with Belgian rifles, Markham and Wicher's
January 7th (search for this): chapter 8
Doc. 9.-battle of Jennie Creek, Ky: fought January 7, 1862. The following is a detailed account of the battle between Colonel Garfield and General Marshall, in which the latter was defeated and routed: camp Buell, near Paintsville, Johnson Co., Ky., January 20. On the morning of the 7th of January the command, composed of the Forty-second Ohio and the Fourteenth Kentucky, and Major McLaughlin's squadron of Ohio cavalry, making an effective force of about fifteen hundred men, broke up their camp on the Muddy Creek, and moved into Paintsville, the county-seat of Johnson County, Kentucky. While on the march we were reenforced by a battalion of the First Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Bolles, and by three hundred of the Twenty-second Kentucky, raising our force to about twenty-two hundred men. The enemy, under Humphrey Marshall, numbering five thousand men, and having a battery of four pieces, learning of our approach, and also of that of the Fortieth Ohio and of four hun
January 20th (search for this): chapter 8
Doc. 9.-battle of Jennie Creek, Ky: fought January 7, 1862. The following is a detailed account of the battle between Colonel Garfield and General Marshall, in which the latter was defeated and routed: camp Buell, near Paintsville, Johnson Co., Ky., January 20. On the morning of the 7th of January the command, composed of the Forty-second Ohio and the Fourteenth Kentucky, and Major McLaughlin's squadron of Ohio cavalry, making an effective force of about fifteen hundred men, broke up their camp on the Muddy Creek, and moved into Paintsville, the county-seat of Johnson County, Kentucky. While on the march we were reenforced by a battalion of the First Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Bolles, and by three hundred of the Twenty-second Kentucky, raising our force to about twenty-two hundred men. The enemy, under Humphrey Marshall, numbering five thousand men, and having a battery of four pieces, learning of our approach, and also of that of the Fortieth Ohio and of four hun
January 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 8
Doc. 9.-battle of Jennie Creek, Ky: fought January 7, 1862. The following is a detailed account of the battle between Colonel Garfield and General Marshall, in which the latter was defeated and routed: camp Buell, near Paintsville, Johnson Co., Ky., January 20. On the morning of the 7th of January the command, composed of the Forty-second Ohio and the Fourteenth Kentucky, and Major McLaughlin's squadron of Ohio cavalry, making an effective force of about fifteen hundred men, broke up their camp on the Muddy Creek, and moved into Paintsville, the county-seat of Johnson County, Kentucky. While on the march we were reenforced by a battalion of the First Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Bolles, and by three hundred of the Twenty-second Kentucky, raising our force to about twenty-two hundred men. The enemy, under Humphrey Marshall, numbering five thousand men, and having a battery of four pieces, learning of our approach, and also of that of the Fortieth Ohio and of four hu
wever, when the evidences of a hasty retreat became so apparent that all were convinced that the game had flown. The object of the march having been thus thwarted, an early return to our camp at Paintsville became our aim, and we accomplished it at the dawn. A harder march was, I venture say, never endured by troops in the same length of time. At nine A. M. on the eighth, the Fortieth and Wolford's cavalry joined us, raising our effective force to about twenty-four hundred, after deducting Ball's cavalry, which, in obedience to orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detailed from the Forty-second and Fortieth Ohio, and Fourteenth Kentucky each three hundred men, and from the Twenty-second Kentucky two hundred men, and taking the immediate command, supported, however, by Colonel Craner of the Fortieth, and Major Burke of the Fourteenth, and detaching Colonel Wolford's and Major McLaughlin's cavalry up Jennie's Creek, march
S. M. Barber (search for this): chapter 8
ware of the whereabouts of the other divisions of the rebel force, immediately commenced the erection of a pontoon or floating bridge across the Paint, and at four P. M. crossed with eight companies of the Forty-second Ohio, and two companies of the Fourteenth Kentucky, with a view of making an armed reconnoissance, and if possible of cutting off and capturing the cavalry. At two P. M. he had despatched Colonel Bolles' cavalry and one company of the Forty-second, under the command of Captain S. M. Barber, with orders to give a good account of the aforesaid cavalry. But later in the day, on learning of the possibility of cutting them off, had sent orders to Colonel Bolles not to attack them until he had had time to get in their rear. Not receiving the last orders, and indeed before they were issued, Colonel Bolles, in obedience to the first orders, crossed the Paint by fording, and vigorously assaulting the enemy soon put them to an inglorious flight up the valley of Jennie. In thei
Johnson County, Kentucky. While on the march we were reenforced by a battalion of the First Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Bolles, and by three hundred of the Twenty-second Kentucky, raising our force to about twenty-two hundred men. The enemy, unng an armed reconnoissance, and if possible of cutting off and capturing the cavalry. At two P. M. he had despatched Colonel Bolles' cavalry and one company of the Forty-second, under the command of Captain S. M. Barber, with orders to give a good a the aforesaid cavalry. But later in the day, on learning of the possibility of cutting them off, had sent orders to Colonel Bolles not to attack them until he had had time to get in their rear. Not receiving the last orders, and indeed before they were issued, Colonel Bolles, in obedience to the first orders, crossed the Paint by fording, and vigorously assaulting the enemy soon put them to an inglorious flight up the valley of Jennie. In their haste, followed as they were up the narrow road
Erhardt Burke (search for this): chapter 8
th and Wolford's cavalry joined us, raising our effective force to about twenty-four hundred, after deducting Ball's cavalry, which, in obedience to orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detailed from the Forty-second and Fortieth Ohio, and Fourteenth Kentucky each three hundred men, and from the Twenty-second Kentucky two hundred men, and taking the immediate command, supported, however, by Colonel Craner of the Fortieth, and Major Burke of the Fourteenth, and detaching Colonel Wolford's and Major McLaughlin's cavalry up Jennie's Creek, marched up the river road leading to Prestonburg. Early on the morning of the tenth, Colonel Sheldon of the Forty-second Ohio, in command at the camp, received a dispatch from Colonel Garfield stating that he had found the enemy, and asking reenforcements. In compliance with the order, at six A. M. on the tenth, Colonel Sheldon marched with eight hundred men, and all the day they eagerly
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