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South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
out seven hundred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-western Virginia, it was of course an important point in the strategic policy of General Marshall. Our march occupied two entire days, and was attended with the severest labor. The nature of the roads, being merely paths, following the creeks and rivulets, the constant rain and snow soaking both officers and men to the skin, and the fathomless, endless mud, formed a combination of untoward circumstances, difficult to overcome. Nevertheless, after two days of wading and splashing, the
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
unting in all to about seven hundred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-western Virginia, it was of course an important point in the strategic policy of General Marshall. Our march occupied two entire days, and was attended with the severest labor. The nature of the roads, being merely paths, following the creeks and rivulets, the constant rain and snow soaking both officers and men to the skin, and the fathomless, endless mud, formed a combination of untoward circumstances, difficult to overcome. Nevertheless, after two days of wading a
Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
undred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-westernwounding several. We were now ordered back to camp, as the nature of the country precluded any possibility of our ever overtaking them. It being suspected, however, that a large proportion had retreated before our arrival, by the road toward Abingdon, our cavalry was brought up the hill and sent in pursuit. We now turned in to ransack their camp. It comprised sixty log huts, or barracks, capable of accommodating about a dozen men each, besides ten commissary buildings, and one large hous
Gap (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
e waters of Elkhorn Creek, encountered their pickets, dispersed them with a loss of one man on each side, and after making some valuable observations, returned to camp. A party was immediately detailed from the Twenty-second Kentucky regiment, the Fortieth and Forty-second Ohio, beside one hundred cavalry, under command of Major McLaughlin, amounting in all to about seven hundred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-western Virginia, it was of course an important point in the strategic policy of General Marshall. Our march occupied two ent
Payne Gap (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
formed you that we were about starting out on a scouting party, consisting of four hundred from the Twenty-second Kentucky, and about an equal number from the Fortieth and Forty-second Ohio, and one hundred cavalry of the First Ohio squadron, making a force of nearly nine hundred, all under the direct command of Brigadier-Gen. Garfield. We started on Friday, the thirteenth instant, and after two and a half days of the hardest marching that ever any force undertook or went through, we made Pound Gap on Sunday, the fifteenth, at noon. Although our troops were completely broken down and foot-sore, from having to wade creeks from the very beginning to the time we reached the foot of the Cumberland Mountains, we climbed the hill, drove in the pickets, and made short work of it in driving the thieving rascals from their boasted stronghold. When we got to the foot of the Cumberland, the whole force was divided into three divisions. The first, cavalry, under Major McLaughlin; the second
Gladesville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
ter making some valuable observations, returned to camp. A party was immediately detailed from the Twenty-second Kentucky regiment, the Fortieth and Forty-second Ohio, beside one hundred cavalry, under command of Major McLaughlin, amounting in all to about seven hundred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-western Virginia, it was of course an important point in the strategic policy of General Marshall. Our march occupied two entire days, and was attended with the severest labor. The nature of the roads, being merely paths, following the
Pike County (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
burned. Late in the afternoon, laden with trophies, our troops descended the mountain to the camp of the previous night, and on the morning following began our long, weary return-march. Two more days of floundering through mud and water, and we are again in camp. Though the expedition lacks the ├ęclat of a brilliant and bloody engagement, it was admirably planned and ably executed, and will, it is hoped, be permanent in its effects. Louisville Democrat account. Piketon, Pike Co., Ky., Friday, March 21. In my last I informed you that we were about starting out on a scouting party, consisting of four hundred from the Twenty-second Kentucky, and about an equal number from the Fortieth and Forty-second Ohio, and one hundred cavalry of the First Ohio squadron, making a force of nearly nine hundred, all under the direct command of Brigadier-Gen. Garfield. We started on Friday, the thirteenth instant, and after two and a half days of the hardest marching that ever any f
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
undred, to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the western slope by large trees, fallen across it by the rebels. Being the only channel of communication for wagons between South-eastern Kentucky and South-western Virginia, it was of course an important point in the strategic policy of General Marshall. Our march occupied two entire days, and was attended with the severest labor. The nature of the roads, being merely paths, following the creeks and rivulets, the constant rain and snow soaking both officers and men to the skin, and the fathomless, endless mud, formed a combination of untoward circumstances, difficult to overcome. Nevertheless, after two days of wading and splashing, the whole expedi
Piketon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
Doc. 96.-fight at pound Gap. March 16, 1862. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette gives the following account of this fight: Piketon, March 19, 1862. For some time it has been known to Gen. Garfield that an irregularly organized body of rebels, amounting to some four hundred or five hundred, were holding the pas to make an assault upon the main body at the Gap, and wipe out the foul den of miscreants at a blow. Sounding Gap is situated about forty miles south-east from Piketon, and is connected, by a good turnpike-road, with Gladesville and Abingdon, Va. A road has been cut through the Gap, which is now entirely obstructed on the wesliant and bloody engagement, it was admirably planned and ably executed, and will, it is hoped, be permanent in its effects. Louisville Democrat account. Piketon, Pike Co., Ky., Friday, March 21. In my last I informed you that we were about starting out on a scouting party, consisting of four hundred from the Twenty-sec
Doc. 96.-fight at pound Gap. March 16, 1862. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette gives the following account of this fight: Piketon, March 19, 1862. For some time it has been known to Gen. Garfield that an irregularly organized body of rebels, amounting to some four hundred or five hundred, were holding the pass through the Cumberland Mountains, known as the Pound or Sounding Gap. Though, militarily speaking, they were of little account, owing to their loose, imperfect organisation, and their harum-scarum guerrilla character, yet this, under the circumstances, rendered them even more troublesome, so that a perfect reign of terror prevailed throughout a large area, of which their rendezvous was the centre. Some fifteen days ago a small scouting party of our troops was sent out, which penetrated to the waters of Elkhorn Creek, encountered their pickets, dispersed them with a loss of one man on each side, and after making some valuable observations, returned to c
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