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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 4 results.

Ruth N. Cromwell (search for this): chapter 311
ird regiment P. V.: camp Birney, Feb. 27, 1862. dear Father: I write you these few lines in very great haste, to let you know that at last we are under marching orders. As you may suppose, everything is bustle and hurry. I have just been handed one hundred rounds of cartridges and four days rations! Of course it is not possible for me to tell you our destination. The camp is in wild excitement. Cheer after cheer is going up, so rejoiced are all the boys at the probability of our meeting the rebels. I doubt not that before this reaches you I shall have my pack upon my back, and be on the march to Dixie's land. I am well and in the very best spirits, and, be assured, shall endeavor to do my duty in every emergency. But I can't spare another moment, except to say to all at home: give yourselves no uneasiness on my account, for I put all my trust in God! What is this but the old doctrine of Cromwell, Trust in God, and keep your powder dry ? Phila. Press, March 6.
Spunk.--Indicating the spirit which animates the Union army, is the following letter from a soldier in Col. Neill's Twenty-third regiment P. V.: camp Birney, Feb. 27, 1862. dear Father: I write you these few lines in very great haste, to let you know that at last we are under marching orders. As you may suppose, everything is bustle and hurry. I have just been handed one hundred rounds of cartridges and four days rations! Of course it is not possible for me to tell you our destination. The camp is in wild excitement. Cheer after cheer is going up, so rejoiced are all the boys at the probability of our meeting the rebels. I doubt not that before this reaches you I shall have my pack upon my back, and be on the march to Dixie's land. I am well and in the very best spirits, and, be assured, shall endeavor to do my duty in every emergency. But I can't spare another moment, except to say to all at home: give yourselves no uneasiness on my account, for I put all my tru
rd regiment P. V.: camp Birney, Feb. 27, 1862. dear Father: I write you these few lines in very great haste, to let you know that at last we are under marching orders. As you may suppose, everything is bustle and hurry. I have just been handed one hundred rounds of cartridges and four days rations! Of course it is not possible for me to tell you our destination. The camp is in wild excitement. Cheer after cheer is going up, so rejoiced are all the boys at the probability of our meeting the rebels. I doubt not that before this reaches you I shall have my pack upon my back, and be on the march to Dixie's land. I am well and in the very best spirits, and, be assured, shall endeavor to do my duty in every emergency. But I can't spare another moment, except to say to all at home: give yourselves no uneasiness on my account, for I put all my trust in God! What is this but the old doctrine of Cromwell, Trust in God, and keep your powder dry ? Phila. Press, March 6.
February 27th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 311
Spunk.--Indicating the spirit which animates the Union army, is the following letter from a soldier in Col. Neill's Twenty-third regiment P. V.: camp Birney, Feb. 27, 1862. dear Father: I write you these few lines in very great haste, to let you know that at last we are under marching orders. As you may suppose, everything is bustle and hurry. I have just been handed one hundred rounds of cartridges and four days rations! Of course it is not possible for me to tell you our destination. The camp is in wild excitement. Cheer after cheer is going up, so rejoiced are all the boys at the probability of our meeting the rebels. I doubt not that before this reaches you I shall have my pack upon my back, and be on the march to Dixie's land. I am well and in the very best spirits, and, be assured, shall endeavor to do my duty in every emergency. But I can't spare another moment, except to say to all at home: give yourselves no uneasiness on my account, for I put all my tr