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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 13 total hits in 3 results.

Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 316
The Southern States of America.--The representative of a Liverpool house has engaged a number of engravers, lithographers, and copper-plate printers, to proceed to the Southern States of America. They have been engaged for three years, and are to receive each from three to six pounds per week. So secret was the whole affair managed, that none of them knew how they were to be conveyed to their destination, nor what particular business they were to carry out, nor who were the real employers. All they were informed was that they were to be ready to start on Friday night last, and that a certain firm in Liverpool would guarantee their wages and expenses, they having power to break the bargain at the end of any of the years. Is is surmised that they are to be employed in a confederate states government printing-office, to print paper-money. North-British Mail, Feb. 1862.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 316
The Southern States of America.--The representative of a Liverpool house has engaged a number of engravers, lithographers, and copper-plate printers, to proceed to the Southern States of America. They have been engaged for three years, and are to receive each from three to six pounds per week. So secret was the whole affair mAmerica. They have been engaged for three years, and are to receive each from three to six pounds per week. So secret was the whole affair managed, that none of them knew how they were to be conveyed to their destination, nor what particular business they were to carry out, nor who were the real employers. All they were informed was that they were to be ready to start on Friday night last, and that a certain firm in Liverpool would guarantee their wages and expenses, start on Friday night last, and that a certain firm in Liverpool would guarantee their wages and expenses, they having power to break the bargain at the end of any of the years. Is is surmised that they are to be employed in a confederate states government printing-office, to print paper-money. North-British Mail, Feb. 1862.
February, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 316
The Southern States of America.--The representative of a Liverpool house has engaged a number of engravers, lithographers, and copper-plate printers, to proceed to the Southern States of America. They have been engaged for three years, and are to receive each from three to six pounds per week. So secret was the whole affair managed, that none of them knew how they were to be conveyed to their destination, nor what particular business they were to carry out, nor who were the real employers. All they were informed was that they were to be ready to start on Friday night last, and that a certain firm in Liverpool would guarantee their wages and expenses, they having power to break the bargain at the end of any of the years. Is is surmised that they are to be employed in a confederate states government printing-office, to print paper-money. North-British Mail, Feb. 1862.