hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 446 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Doc. 11.-occupation of Norfolk, Va. Report of General Wool. Fortress Monroe, May 12, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretdry of War: on the ninth of May (Friday afternoon) I organized a force to march against Norfolk. On Saturday morning, the tenth of May, the troops were landed under the direction of Capt. Cram at Ocean View, and commenced the march toward Norfolk, with Generals Mansfield and Weber, who proceeded on the direct route by way of Tanner's Creek bridge, but finding it on fire, they returned to the cross-roads, where I formed them and took the direction of the column. I arrived by the old road, and captured the intrenchments in front of the city at twenty minutes before five P. M. I immediately proceeded toward Norfolk, accompanied by the Hon. Secretary Chase, and was met by the Mayor and a select committee of the Common Council of Norfolk at the limits of the city, when they surrendered the city, agreeably to the terms set forth in the resolutions of the Co
L. M. Goldsborough (search for this): chapter 11
rrimac should go back to shell them, what will be the course of the Monitor and our fleet? Will they not follow the Merrimac and give her a fire in the rear? Norfolk, Sunday, May 11, 1862. Here I am in the city of Norfolk, over which floats the flag of the Union from the cupola of the Custom-House, which has been repossessed and reoccupied by the Government. From the masts of five noble vessels-of-war, ranged around the harbor, floats the same beautiful banner, whilst the flag of Com. Goldsborough floats from the Susquehanna, which lies directly in the centre of this line of marine architecture. The guns are protruding from the ports of their long line of wooden walls, which are flanked on the right by the Monitor and the Naugatuck, which are moored in front of old Fort Norfolk. But I must proceed to give you a narrative as to how all these events originated. In my last letter I stated that a force had been landed at Point Pleasant, eight miles in the rear of Norfolk, under
T. J. Cram (search for this): chapter 11
rday morning, the tenth of May, the troops were landed under the direction of Capt. Cram at Ocean View, and commenced the march toward Norfolk, with Generals Mansfielad led directly from that shore to Norfolk. In company with Gen. Wool and Col. T. J. Cram, of the Topographical Engineers, Secretary Chase on Friday crossed over in the condition of the country between there and Norfolk. Secretary Chase and Col. Cram went ashore and satisfied themselves that a landing was perfectly feasible. n. Wool had returned from Norfolk, the Captain rode to the beach and informed Col. Cram, as Chief of the General's staff, that the seven prisoners, whom he had marchrtress Monroe. The Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Chase, and my aid-de-camp, Col. Cram, were with me. We returned to the fort at two o'clock. I immediately organizen six thousand men, and embarked them during the night under the direction of Col. Cram. The Colonel constructed a bridge of boats, and landed the troops at the p
C. C. Dodge (search for this): chapter 11
staff. They were soon followed by the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Col. Wyman. The remainder of the expedition consists of the Tenth New-York, Col. Bendix; the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Bailey; the Ninety-ninth New-York, Coast Guards; Major Dodge's battalion of mounted rifles and Capt. Follett's company (D) of the Fourth regular artillery. Gen. Wool and staff remained to superintend the landing of the remainder of the force, all of whom were landed and off before noon. The Presidenteing nearly a quarter of a mile long, so soon as it was in flames, and pursuit foiled, the rebels fled toward Norfolk. A halt was here ordered, and the men rested until Major-Gen. Wool and staff, with Gens. Viele and Mansfield, came up with Major Dodge's company of mounted rifles, acting as the commanding General's body-guard. A native, who was found on the road, was questioned as to the roads to Norfolk, and it was ascertained that the city could be reached by the Princess Anne road, aroun
P. T. Wyman (search for this): chapter 11
h we have landed is known as Point Pleasant, one of the favorite drives from Norfolk. The first regiment landed was the Twentieth New-York, known as Max Weber's regiment, who pushed on immediately, under command of Gen. Weber, and were at eight o'clock in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nine o'clock, accompanied by Gen. Mansfield and Gen. Viele and staff. They were soon followed by the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Col. Wyman. The remainder of the expedition consists of the Tenth New-York, Col. Bendix; the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Bailey; the Ninety-ninth New-York, Coast Guards; Major Dodge's battalion of mounted rifles and Capt. Follett's company (D) of the Fourth regular artillery. Gen. Wool and staff remained to superintend the landing of the remainder of the force, all of whom were landed and off before noon. The President, accompanied by Secretary Stanton, accompanied Gen. Wool and staff to
George L. Andrews (search for this): chapter 11
n. Mansfield and their staffs to Willoughby's Point, on the steamer Kansas, and here I am on the sacred soil, within eight miles of Norfolk. The point at which we have landed is known as Point Pleasant, one of the favorite drives from Norfolk. The first regiment landed was the Twentieth New-York, known as Max Weber's regiment, who pushed on immediately, under command of Gen. Weber, and were at eight o'clock in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nine o'clock, accompanied by Gen. Mansfield and Gen. Viele and staff. They were soon followed by the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Col. Wyman. The remainder of the expedition consists of the Tenth New-York, Col. Bendix; the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Bailey; the Ninety-ninth New-York, Coast Guards; Major Dodge's battalion of mounted rifles and Capt. Follett's company (D) of the Fourth regular artillery. Gen. Wool and staff remained to superintend the landing
Drake De Kay (search for this): chapter 11
in his own quarters before midnight. One of the neatest little exploits of the campaign was performed by Capt. Drake De Kay, of Gen. Mansfield's staff, while awaiting the General's arrival at a house called Moore's Ranche, a kind of summer hotel, kept by a man named Moore, at Ocean View, the place of debarkation. All the white men and most of the women of this vicinity had fled — it was said by those they had left behind, to the woods, to prevent being forced into the rebel service. Capt. De Kay, while supper was being prepared, mounted his horse and determined to explore the country, followed only by his negro servant. As he was passing a swamp toward evening, he came suddenly upon seven of the secession troops, who were lurking by the roadside, and were armed with double-barrelled guns. The Captain turned and shouted to his (imaginary) company to prepare to charge, and then riding forward rapidly, revolver in hand, told the men they were his prisoners, as his cavalry would so
William H. Moore (search for this): chapter 11
the neatest little exploits of the campaign was performed by Capt. Drake De Kay, of Gen. Mansfield's staff, while awaiting the General's arrival at a house called Moore's Ranche, a kind of summer hotel, kept by a man named Moore, at Ocean View, the place of debarkation. All the white men and most of the women of this vicinity hadMoore, at Ocean View, the place of debarkation. All the white men and most of the women of this vicinity had fled — it was said by those they had left behind, to the woods, to prevent being forced into the rebel service. Capt. De Kay, while supper was being prepared, mounted his horse and determined to explore the country, followed only by his negro servant. As he was passing a swamp toward evening, he came suddenly upon seven of the sbeach, were at his disposal. Their arms were taken away, and on promising to take the oath of allegiance the men were at once dismissed. One of them proved to be Moore himself, who came over to his house, where he found half a dozen of us in full possession, and just preparing to discuss a very comfortable supper which his colore
m at Ocean View, and commenced the march toward Norfolk, with Generals Mansfield and Weber, who proceeded on the direct route by way of Tannerguns on the opposite bank, which they opened upon our advance. Gen. Mansfield, who had come over from Newport News, at Gen. Wool's request, txploits of the campaign was performed by Capt. Drake De Kay, of Gen. Mansfield's staff, while awaiting the General's arrival at a house calledon, I obtained this morning a permit to accompany Gen. Wool and Gen. Mansfield and their staffs to Willoughby's Point, on the steamer Kansas, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nine o'clock, accompanied by Gen. Mansfield and Gen. Viele and staff. They were soon followed by the Sixtehe rear of Norfolk, under command of Major-Gen. Wool, with Brig.-Generals Mansfield, Max Weber, and Viele. The first division of the troops l men rested until Major-Gen. Wool and staff, with Gens. Viele and Mansfield, came up with Major Dodge's company of mounted rifles, acting as
, and were at eight o'clock in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nine o'clock, accompanied by Gen. Mansfield and Gen. Viele and staff. They were soon followed by the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Col. Wyman. The remainder of the expedition consists of the Tenth New-York, Col. Bendix; the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Bailey; the Ninety-ninth New-York, Coast Guards; Major Dodge's battalion of mounted rifles and Capt. Follett's company (D) of the Fourth regular artillery. Gen. Wool and staff remained to superintend the landing of the remainder of the force, all of whom were landed and off before noon. The President, accompanied by Secretary Stanton, accompanied Gen. Wool and staff to the wharf, and then took a tug and proceeded to the Minnesota, where the President was received by a national salute. It is generally admitted that the President and Secretary have infused new vigor into both naval and milita
1 2 3 4 5 6