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Orleans, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
ements are confirmed by his scouts, who report large trains passing up through Orleans to White Plains. (Signed) Irwin McDowell, Major-General. True copy: John P62, 12 P. M. General McDowell: Gen. Sigel reports the enemy's rear-guard at Orleans to-night, with his main force encamped at White Plains. You will please ascerrge force of the enemy's cavalry had crossed on my right and was moving toward Orleans, and that another force had crossed on my left at Sulphur Springs, and taken pompanies of the First Virginia and two of the First Maryland, I ordered toward Orleans for the purpose of protecting my right flank. Meanwhile cannonading was kept at White Plains, the advanced guard east of Thoroughfare Gap, and the rear at Orleans. This news was brought in by all the scouts sent out by me, and some cavalrcountry paths and comfortable homesteads, by a little town in Fauquier, called Orleans, on and on, as if we would never cease — to Salem, on the Manassas Gap Railroa
Chantilly (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
n as he arrived, was ordered to take post between Centreville and Chantilly, and to occupy Chantilly in force; McDowell was posted about two Chantilly in force; McDowell was posted about two miles in the rear of Centreville, on the road to Fairfax Court-House. Ammunition-trains and some provisions were gotten up on the thirty-firned to attack at daylight on the second of September, in front of Chantilly. The movement of the enemy had become so developed by the afternorth of the road from Centreville to Fairfax, in the direction of Chantilly. Heintzelman's corps was directed to take post on the road betweust. He was killed at the head of his command in the battle near Chantilly on the first September, and his death will be deeply felt by the de is due. R. E. Lee. headquarters Army North-Western Virginia, Chantilly, Sept. 8, 1862. His Excellency, Jefferson Davis, President Confedwildest spirits. On Monday our corps moved to Ox Hill, between Chantilly and Fairfax Court-House, where, in the afternoon, we had, under a
Ox Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
ossing, and the uncertainty of the fords, stopped the pursuit. The next morning the enemy was discovered in the strong position at Centreville, and the army was put in motion toward the Little River turnpike, to turn his right. Upon reaching Ox Hill, on the first of September, he was again discovered in our front on the heights of Germantown, and about five P. M. made a spirited attack upon the front and, right of our columns, with a view of apparently covering the withdrawal of his trains ed my clothing. On Saturday I had the narrowest escape yet; two cannon-balls, within a minute of each other, passed so near me as almost to take away my breath. Strange to tell, it put me in the wildest spirits. On Monday our corps moved to Ox Hill, between Chantilly and Fairfax Court-House, where, in the afternoon, we had, under a driving thunder-storm, a smart but undecisive fight with three divisions of the enemy. In it were killed Generals Kearny and Stevens, valuable officers, both w
White Plains (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
iously, was marching with all speed in the direction of White Plains and Salem, and from those points would be able to turn far advanced toward me, that Jackson's movement toward White Plains, and in the direction of Thoroughfare Gap, had caused bth, I think their advance moved off in the direction of White Plains, pursuing the route previously taken by Jackson, and, n west of the Bull Run range, and in the neighborhood of White Plains. Thinking it altogether likely that Jackson would mass, who report large trains passing up through Orleans to White Plains. (Signed) Irwin McDowell, Major-General. True copy:rd at Orleans to-night, with his main force encamped at White Plains. You will please ascertain very early in the morning w the following night that his main army was encamped at White Plains, the advanced guard east of Thoroughfare Gap, and the rring with blank amazement. So all day Tuesday, through White Plains, Haymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Ga
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
4. McDowell's corps, the road by Fall's Church, Little River, and Columbia pike toward Fort Craig and Tillinghast. The corps of Porter, Sumner, and Sigel, via Vienna, toward the Chain Bridge. These three latter corps will keep well closed up, and within easy supporting distance of each other. The cavalry under Gen. Buford e slightest loss of property. The enemy has made no advances this morning, owing no doubt to his severe loss last evening. Three army corps pursue the route via Vienna to Chain Bridge, covered by all the effective cavalry. Ten corps by the Braddock road. These last corps are ordered to break up the depot at Fairfax station, calleck, General--in--Chief, Washington: I arrived here safely. Command coming in on the road without much molestation. Some artillery firing on the roads through Vienna to Chain Bridge, but nothing of a serious character so far as I can learn. Within an hour all the commands on the other roads will be in camp within the intrench
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
ere making any movements in the direction of Germantown or Fairfax Court-House. The enemy was foundwere in the vicinity, and to push forward to Germantown with his advance. I directed McDowell to mossembled, I think, on Licking River, between Germantown and the railroad, with a reserve for the forther the enemy is making any movement toward Germantown and Fairfax Court-House. I do not wish any o brigades now there, and immediately occupy Germantown with your whole force, so as to cover the tujor-Gen. Hooker: You will at once proceed to Germantown, assume command of the troops arriving at Faax Court-House: Move your brigade at once to Germantown, and join it to the one under Col. Hincks atWashington, together with those stationed at Germantown. By command of Major-Gen. Pope. (Signed all their troops coming from Washington to Germantown. They must be at Germantown as early this ain discovered in our front on the heights of Germantown, and about five P. M. made a spirited attack[2 more...]
Difficult Creek (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
e afternoon to Fairfax Court-House, and directed him to assemble all the troops that were in the vicinity, and to push forward to Germantown with his advance. I directed McDowell to move back along the road to Fairfax Court-House, as far as Difficult Creek, and to connect by his right with Hooker. Reno was to push forward to the north of the road from Centreville to Fairfax, in the direction of Chantilly. Heintzelman's corps was directed to take post on the road between Centreville and Fairfnot impossible, to repair. He died as he would have wished to die, and as became his heroic character. On the morning of the second of September, the enemy still continuing his movements toward our right, my whole force was posted behind Difficult Creek, from Flint Hill to the Alexandria turnpike. Although we were quite able to maintain our position at that place until the stragglers could be collected, and the army, after its labors and perils, put into condition for effective service, I
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
ences which would be likely to result from it, and urged upon him that he should send orders to Gen. McClellan that if he were unable to maintain his position upon the Chickahominy, and were pressed by superior forces of the enemy, to mass his whole force on the north side of that stream, even at the risk of losing much material of war, and endeavor to make his way in the direction of Hanover Court-House; but in no event to retreat with his army further to the south than the White House on York River. I stated to the President that the retreat to James River was carrying General McClellan away from any reinforcements that could possibly be sent him within a reasonable time, and was absolutely depriving him of any substantial aid from the forces under my command; that by this movement the whole army of the enemy would be interposed between his army and mine, and that they would then be at liberty to strike in either direction, as they might consider it most advantageous; that this move
Andersons (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
in line of battle, with our right toward Centreville. Some few shells were thrown into a clump of woods in front, where the enemy were last seen, but without eliciting any response. Some two hours elapsed, when heavy firing was heard on our left, which we concluded was from McDowell's corps and the enemy, who had worked around from our front in that direction. We were immediately put in motion, and marched on the Warrenton road, and took position for the night on a little hill east of Stone-house, our right resting on the pike. On Friday morning, early, the engagement was commenced by General Milroy on our right, in which we soon after took part, and a rapid artillery fire ensued from both sides. For some time heavy columns of the enemy could be seen filing out of a woods in front, and gradually falling back. They were within range of our guns, which were turned on them, and must have done some execution. An hour after we received the order to move one brigade by the flank t
New Market (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
s had already advanced against them, when, on a report made to General McDowell, I received orders to march forthwith to Manassas Junction. I reluctantly obeyed this order, marched off from the right, and was within two and a half miles from Manassas when our cavalry reported that Manassas was evacuated by the enemy, and that General Kearny was in possession of that point. As I was sure that the enemy must be somewhere between Centreville and Gainesville, I asked permission to march to New-Market, whereupon I was directed to march to Centreville. This order was in execution, and the troops prepared to cross the fords of Bull Run, when our advance met the enemy on the road leading from New-Market to Sudley's Ford, this side of Bull Run. About the same time I received a report from General Pope that the enemy was concentrating at Centreville. Supposing that this was correct, I directed the brigades of General Milroy and Colonel McLean to advance against the enemy this side of Bu
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