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Illinois volunteers, and Lieutenant Wood, of the Signal Corps, for the able, gallant, and heroic manner in which they discharged their respective duties during the engagement, always ready and willing to take any risk or make any sacrifice for the good of their country's cause. Surgeon Hazlet, of the Fifty-ninth Illinois; Lieut.-Col. Keith, Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Johnson, Fifty-eighth Illinois; Lieut. Tolbert, Lieut. Ridler, and Captain R. K. Smith, of the Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Blean and Lieut. Eels, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, died gallantly defending the honor of their country's flag. On the morning of the ninth, a force of rebel cavalry was seen winding from the enemy's left, and evidently proceeding toward the Harrods-burgh turnpike. I directed Hotchkiss's battery to fire upon them, which was done with good effect, the enemy rapidly retreating. I then advanced with my division to this point, seeing on every side indications of the enemy's precipitate ret
Henry W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 138
Doc. 128.-battle of Chaplin hills, Ky. this battle is also known as the battle of Perryville. General Buell's report. Perryville, Ky., via Bardstown, Oct. 10, 1862. To Major-Gen. H. W. Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: I have already advised you of the movements of the army under my command from Louisville. More or less skirmishing has occurred daily with the enemy's cavalry since then, and it was supposed the enemy would give battle at Bardstown. By troops reached that point on the fourth, driving the enemy's rear guard of cavalry and artillery of the main body to Springfield, whither pursuit was continued. The centre corps, under General Gilbert, moved in the direct road from Springfield to Perrysville, and arrived on the seventh one mile from town, where the enemy was found to be in force. The left column, under Gen. McCook, came upon the Maxville road about ten o'clock yesterday, (the eighth.) It was ordered into position to attack, and a strong reconnoissance di
P. M. Colonel (search for this): chapter 138
nety-eighth Ohio.) They however still advanced, preventing Capt. Harris from getting the whole of his battery off. Heavy firing all along this changed front still continued. The line, so far as was observable from this division, was then at a right angle with the main road, instead of parallel with it as before, when fresh troops from the extreme right rushed in with rapidity and gallantry, checking the further advance of the enemy, and closing the fight at dark. At about half-past 5 P. M. Colonel George Webster fell from his horse mortally wounded. No man on that battle-field displayed more of the characteristics of the soldier than he. He fully understood and most faithfully discharged his duty. Of General Terrell's fatal wound I was not apprised until the battle closed, when I found him lying prostrate and receiving every aid and comfort from his devoted staff. Up to the time of the loss of Lieutenant Parsons's battery, both he and his Adjutant-General, Captain William P. An
I. D. Clark (search for this): chapter 138
Gen. Rousseau. He ordered me to move to the front to support a battery, which I promptly did. I must here mention that company A, Captain Cook, and company F, Captain Clark, by order of Colonel Webster, from the first were left to the immediate support of the Nineteenth Indiana battery, and remained in that position, under the comhe hill some five hundred yards in front, company A, in command of Lieut. Bucke, and company H, under command of Lieut. Summers, both companies under command of Capt. Clark, acting Major, were deployed as skirmishers, and our line advanced to the position named. Some three hundred yards from the Run, at five minutes past four o'pecially naming any. Yet circumstances and the varied incidents of the day brought under my special observation the conduct of some, whom I therefore name. Captain I. D. Clark, of company A, Acting Major, from the time the first shot was fired on the skirmishers under his command in the early morning, until the battle was over and
A. R. Chapin (search for this): chapter 138
d's cavalry, was being made in that direction in great force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery. I aided Col. Harris, commanding the Ninth brigade, to form his brigade in two lines — the Second Ohio, Lieut.-Colonel Kell; the Tenth Wisconsin, Col. Chapin, and the Thirty-third Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Moore, being in the front line. Soon after this, by a messenger, Colonel Starkweather, commanding the Twenty-eighth announced his arrival on the left, his brigade having been unfortunately cut off and sIndiana to take position where the battery had been. This was not done a moment too soon, as the enemy were advancing on us. By a well-directed volley from the Thirty-eighth Indiana (Col. B. F. Scribner commanding) and the Tenth Wisconsin (Col. A. R. Chapin commanding) they were driven behind the crest of the hill. They again advanced, but were driven back. This was done for the third time, when they took position behind the crest of the hill. At this time the firing was very heavy. I no
nflict. I cannot refrain from expressing my gratitude to my staff, including Lieut. Pratt, A. A.A. G., Lieut. Lines, A. D.C., Lieut. Rankin, of the Second Kansas regiment; Lieut. Andrews, of the Forty-second Illinois volunteers, and Lieutenant Wood, of the Signal Corps, for the able, gallant, and heroic manner in which they discharged their respective duties during the engagement, always ready and willing to take any risk or make any sacrifice for the good of their country's cause. Surgeon Hazlet, of the Fifty-ninth Illinois; Lieut.-Col. Keith, Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Johnson, Fifty-eighth Illinois; Lieut. Tolbert, Lieut. Ridler, and Captain R. K. Smith, of the Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Blean and Lieut. Eels, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, died gallantly defending the honor of their country's flag. On the morning of the ninth, a force of rebel cavalry was seen winding from the enemy's left, and evidently proceeding toward the Harrods-burgh turnpike. I directed Hotch
dvantages of position. The appearance of the field the next day showed, however, that the brave heroes of Pea Ridge (the Twenty-second Indiana and the Fifty-ninth Illinois volunteers) had returned the fire with terrible effect, and had added new and bright laurels to their former fame. The Seventy-fifth Illinois volunteers, under Lieut.-Colonel Bennett, were upon this line, and having a reputation to gain as soldiers, nobly did the work before them. Their loss was heavy, including Major Kilgore wounded severely. Col. Gooding, during the temporary confusion produced by a heavy flank-fire of the concealed enemy, became involved in the enemy's lines, was slightly wounded and taken prisoner. By his address and cool bravery, however, he succeeded in deceiving the commander of the rebel forces till his brigade had withdrawn to a position where they were less exposed to cross-fires. Lieut.-Col. Keith, Twenty-second Indiana volunteers, and Lieut. West, Acting Assistant Adjutant-
Leonidas McDougal (search for this): chapter 138
ding corn. At this time my left wing rested upon a lane known as the----road, my line of battle extending along the crest of the hill, and passing near to and somewhat beyond, a large barn filled with hay. In this position, with a well-handled battery playing upon us, our first fire was delivered — the enemy replying with destructive effect. Captain H. E. Cunard, company I, was one of the first to fall, shot through the head while gallantly performing his duty. A little later Capt. Leonidas McDougal, company H, while waving his sword and cheering his men, fell, pierced by a ball through the breast. Later still First Lieut. Starr, company K, died like a soldier in the midst of his men. About one hundred and seventy-five of my regiment were killed and wounded upon the crest of the hill. Our line was steadfastly maintained until the barn on our right was fired by a shell from the enemy's battery, and in a few minutes the heat became so intense that my right was compelled to fa
rty-fourth Illinois infantry; Henry Kline, First Ohio battery; George P. Jenniss, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Wm. Edwards, Second Indiana cavalry, and Henry Knowles, Second Indiana cavalry, behaved with coolness and bravery on the field, and are recommended to their superiors for promotion. To Surgeon George D. Beebe, Medical Director of my corps, my thanks are due for his good conduct on the field, and the kind care he has taken of the wounded. Favorable mention is also made of Surgeons Marke, Tenth Wisconsin; Dixon, First Wisconsin; Williams, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio; Wright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania; Beckwith, Thirty-fifth Indiana; Sinnett, Ninety-fourth Ohio, and Fowler,----; Assistant-Surgeons Taft, One Hundred and First Ohio; Devendorf, First Wisconsin; Albright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania; Mitchell, Tenth Wisconsin; Reeve and Fuller, Twenty-first Wisconsin; and Shannon, Second Ohio. Major C. S. Cotter, First Ohio artillery, chief of that arm, behaved with
Thomas L. P. Defrees (search for this): chapter 138
engagement. It would be injustice to make any distinction. Captain Carr, of company D, fell in the charge while boldly leading his men on. Captain Carter, of company I, fell as gloriously, with his face to the foe, as a soldier should. Lieut. Key, of company I, after the fall of Captain Carter, while bravely leading his boys in the charge, was seriously wounded in the knee. I must acknowledge in grateful terms the invaluable services throughout the day of the gallant soldier, Major Thomas L. P. Defrees. I also take great pleasure in bearing testimony to the promptness and bravery of Adjutant George R. Elstner, in his constant assistance throughout the engagement. Although out of the ordinary course of a report of this kind, still I hope you will permit me to make honorable mention of the bravery and timely assistance rendered me at a critical point of the engagement by Lieut. J. T. Collins, of company E, Ninety-eighth Ohio regiment, acting Aid to Col. Webster. The Fiftieth O
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