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Mount Washington, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
a stand anywhere for any purpose, and hence would have rushed into the trap which they set for us at Perryville. One other circumstance confirmed us in our belief that we were going to have a great battle at Perryville, and made us still more cautious. As I have already said, the rebel cavalry, occasionally a few infantry, and once, at least, a piece or two of artillery, were skirmishing with our advance all the way from Louisville, several being killed and wounded on both sides, at Mount Washington, at Bardstown, at Springfield, at Texas, and on Tuesday afternoon and night, at a point still nearer the battle-field. Another skirmish was commenced on Wednesday morning, which the rebel leaders doubtless intended to complete the deception they had all along been practising upon us, and make it the last bait to allure us into their trap. Owing, however, to the ardor of the troops on both sides, the skirmish assumed the proportions of a bloody battle. On Tuesday afternoon, General
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
h Ohio on the right of Townsend, the right resting on a field. The other regiments of this brigade were in second line and supporting the batteries. The line of Stedman's brigade was about two hundred yards to the right and rear of Russell's house. By this time it was dark, and the firing ceased on both sides. I remained in front of Stedman's line until nine P. M., when I rode to the left and found that the line there had been retired by General Rousseau. Believing that the enemy would renew the attack at daylight, I ordered him to throw his line back, with his left resting on the Maxville and Perry-ville road, and the line extending to the right on commanding ground to the left of Stedman's brigade. This movement was executed about twelve o'clock at night. When General Terrell's brigade gave way, a portion of his troops fell back with him to the position occupied by Stone's and Bush's batteries, and at this point, when in the act of rallying his broken troops, at four o'cloc
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
eut. Grover, of Col. Lytle's staff, with an order from him to retire. Accordingly, we turned into a ravine on the right of the road, and were supplying ourselves with ammunition, when, hearing that Col. Lytle, my brigade commander, was killed, and being separated from the other regiments of the brigade, I reported to Col. Harris, commanding the Ninth brigade, for further duty. Night soon came on, however, and the engagement ceased. During the battle, the flag presented by the people of Ohio to the Third regiment was gallantly upheld. It never once touched the earth, although the Color-Sergeant, McCrovie, was killed, and, after him, five others who successfully bore it, were shot down. My regiment went into action with five hundred men. Our loss was forty-five killed, one hundred and forty-four wounded, and fifteen missing; a list of whom is hereunto annexed. Fully appreciating the valor of my own officers and men, I desire to bear testimony to the gallant conduct of the F
Dixieville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
exhausted all its long-range ammunition, had been retired from its position in the afternoon, to a commanding ridge about one hundred and fifty yards in rear of Russell's house and on the right of the Perryville road supported by three companies of the Michigan Mechanics and Engineers, commanded by Major Hopkins. I ordered Captain Loomis to reserve his canister for close work. This battery opened fire and repulsed this wicked attack for the first time. I then went to the point where the Dixieville and Springfield road crosses the Maxville and Perryville road. Near this point I met Captain Hoblitzell with a brigade of General Robert B. Mitchell's division, coming to reinforce us. This brigade was commanded by Colonel Gooding, of the Twenty-second Indiana, and consisted of his own regiment, the Fifty-ninth and Seventy-fifth Illinois, and Captain O. F. Pinney's Fifth Wisconsin battery. I ordered the posting of his infantry, and then placed Captain Pinney's battery in position near the
Chaplin Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
, at the same time putting the batteries in position. Colonel Laiboldt drove the enemy back down the hill and across Chaplin Creek, after an obstinate contest, in which the loss was severe on both sides. Captain Barnett, with one section of his baof the belt of timber, where he had an enfilading fire on the enemy's batteries on the opposite side of the valley of Chaplin Creek; advancing at the same time six regiments to support him. The fire of Captain Hescock was here very severely felt by ell, understood to be two or three miles on our right. Waiting, perhaps, an hour, I concluded to resume the march to Chaplin Creek, then probably a mile to our front, to get water for my men, who were suffering intensely for want of it. There was a to take the advance of the brigade to which it belongs, and proceeded to the crest of a hill overlooking a branch of Chaplin Creek, when the enemy in front opened upon us from a battery, and we were ordered to retire to the foot of the hill, some h
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
General Commanding, whose presence in the midst of my corps inspired all, from the highest to the lowest, with complete confidence. The Third corps presented itself on the field in an orderly and compact style; and I am indebted to Captain O. L. Baldwin, of the Second Kentucky volunteers, Assistant Inspector-General, for his energy in clearing the roads of the wagons, which, on the seventh, had, under some mistake, become involved among the troops, and lined the road all the way back to Lick Creek, and were materially impeding the progress of the troops, especially the artillery. The other members of my staff; (Capt. J. Edward Stacy, A. A.A. G.,) my two Aids-de-Camp, (Lieut. George K. Speed and Lieut. John Speed,) and Capt. George S. Roper, C. S., were active and efficient in transmitting my orders. Surgeon George R. Weeks was active and ready in the duties pertaining to his office as Medical Director. The officers of the signal corps rendered ready and useful service all d
Perrysville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
f: I have already advised you of the movements of the army under my command from Louisville. More or less skirmishing has occurred daily with the enemy's cavalry since then, and it was supposed the enemy would give battle at Bardstown. By troops reached that point on the fourth, driving the enemy's rear guard of cavalry and artillery of the main body to Springfield, whither pursuit was continued. The centre corps, under General Gilbert, moved in the direct road from Springfield to Perrysville, and arrived on the seventh one mile from town, where the enemy was found to be in force. The left column, under Gen. McCook, came upon the Maxville road about ten o'clock yesterday, (the eighth.) It was ordered into position to attack, and a strong reconnoissance directed. At four o'clock I received a request from Gen. McCook for reenforcements, and learned that the left had been seriously engaged for several hours, and that the right and left of that corps were being turned and seve
Chaplin (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
I received verbal instructions from Gen. Buell to make a reconnoissance to Chaplin River. I immediately returned to my troops, and found that Gen. Rousseau had advd suffering greatly for water, I repaired to make the reconnoissance toward Chaplin River, as ordered. Having been informed by my guide, Captain Beverly D. Williamsnt in that vicinity, to a point overlooking and within six hundred yards of Chaplin River. I then sent for Generals Jackson and Terrell, showed them the water, markunning along to the left on the commanding ground, overlooking a portion of Chaplin River to the north, the left forming a crotchet to the rear, in order to occupy ted by the enemy for two six-pound field-guns. The enemy retreated across Chaplin River to the Harrodsburgh turnpike, about one half-mile distant from the battle-fy facility to them to conceal their troops. The bluffs and dry channels of Chaplin River and Doctor's Fork also gave the enemy every advantage for concealing and ma
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
Doc. 128.-battle of Chaplin hills, Ky. this battle is also known as the battle of Perryville. General Buell's report. Perryville, Ky., via Bardstown, Oct. 10, 1862. To Major-Gen. H. W. Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: I have already advised you of the movements of the army under my command from Louisville. More or less skirmishing has occurred daily with the enemy's cavalry since then, and it was supposed the enemy would give battle at Bardstown. By troops reached that point on the fourth, driving the enemy's rear guard of cavalry and artillery of the main body to Springfield, whither pursuit was continued. The centre corps, under General piece or two of artillery, were skirmishing with our advance all the way from Louisville, several being killed and wounded on both sides, at Mount Washington, at Bardstown, at Springfield, at Texas, and on Tuesday afternoon and night, at a point still nearer the battle-field. Another skirmish was commenced on Wednesday morning, wh
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
h Illinois, was in this battle, however, and gloriously maintained its honor. The Twenty-eighth brigade supported Captain Harris's Nineteenth Indiana battery. A few of the men belonging to these brigades were killed and wounded by the fire from the rebel cannon, but generally the shot passed harmlessly over their heads. I was near one of the men who was killed at the time he was struck, and could not but regard it as a singular fatality. His name is----Robb — probably well known in Cincinnati, as he belonged to the Tenth Ohio, and was Colonel Lytle's orderly. He was not with his own regiment at the time of his death, but with the Third Ohio, and was lying amongst the other men upon the ground. While in this position a spherical shot struck him in the side, passed entirely through his body, and buried itself in the ground beyond. He died instantly, and almost without a gasp. Not a man of the regiment he was with, was, in this stage of the battle, either killed or wound
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