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J. C. Starkweather (search for this): chapter 138
py the high ground on his left and rear. Starkweather's brigade and Stone's and Bush's batteries d and driven back by the gallant brigade of Starkweather, so admirably posted for the work they perf also taken by the enemy. The posting of Starkweather's brigade, Stone's and Bush's batteries savantry, commanding the Ninth brigade; Colonel J. C. Starkweather, of the First Wisconsin, commanding . Soon after this, by a messenger, Colonel Starkweather, commanding the Twenty-eighth announced hisst Kentucky, artillery. I then directed Col. Starkweather to place Stone's battery and that of Capiments before them, I galloped around to Col. Starkweather, on the left, and directed him to open hty of seeing and knowing the conduct of Colonel Starkweather, of the Twenty-eighth brigade, Col. Hary. I herewith transmit the reports of Cols. Starkweather, Harris, and Pope, and also a list of ca the left was the Twenty-eighth brigade, Col. Starkweather of the First Wisconsin, commanding. T
W. H. Lytle (search for this): chapter 138
in, commanding the Twenty-eighth brigade; Col. W. H. Lytle, of the Tenth Ohio, commanding the Seventh was promptly done. I then sent a order to Col. Lytle to form his brigade on the right in good poss final struggle on the left, I had heard that Lytle's brigade was outflanked on the right by an ov to retire, which it did under the orders of Col. Lytle, who was at the same moment wounded, as he tlly and with alacrity all that men could do. Col. Lytle, of the Seventeenth brigade, fell severely wurselves with ammunition, when, hearing that Col. Lytle, my brigade commander, was killed, and beingsseau's division, the Seventeenth brigade, Colonel Lytle, to the right, and most of it upon the eas as he belonged to the Tenth Ohio, and was Colonel Lytle's orderly. He was not with his own regier pass away. The Seventeenth brigade (Col. W. H. Lytle, of the Tenth Ohio, commanding) formed, a as they do so. The noble, gifted, generous Lytle, the Chevalier Bayard of the Ohio troops, was [9 more...]
Isaac Bailey (search for this): chapter 138
r-General; Capt. J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. W. T. Hoblitzell, Aid-de-Camp; Lieut. S. W. Davies, Aid-de-Camp; Lieut. S. M. Hosea, Aid-de Camp; Major Caleb Bates, volunteer Aid-de-Camp; Captain N. H. Fisher, volunteer Aid-de-Camp; Captain James P. Collier, volunteer Aid-de-Camp, I return my thanks for their conspicuous gallantry and intelligence on the field of battle. Lieut.-Colonel Bomford was wounded twice, while posting a regiment in line. My orderlies, privates Isaac Bailey, Second Indiana cavalry; George Richardson, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Avery Graham, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Henry Kline, First Ohio battery; George P. Jenniss, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Wm. Edwards, Second Indiana cavalry, and Henry Knowles, Second Indiana cavalry, behaved with coolness and bravery on the field, and are recommended to their superiors for promotion. To Surgeon George D. Beebe, Medical Director of my corps, my thanks are due for his good condu
ids, and to W. F. G. Shanks, my volunteer Aid, for gallant bearing and efficient services rendered on the battle-field. I also acknowledge my indebtedness to Lieutenants Geo. W. Landman, Second Ohio, William Quinton, Nineteenth Illinois, and James H. Connelly, Thirty-seventh Indiana, the signal corps of the third division, for gallantry and valuable services on the field. They attended me voluntarily, (though not their place to do so,) through the thickest of the fight. My Orderlies, Sergt. Damos, Emery, and the rest, behaved gallantly during the battle. Col. Buckner Board, of the Second Kentucky cavalry, and his command, rendered efficient service in making reconnoissances to the front and skirmishing with the enemy. I herewith transmit the reports of Cols. Starkweather, Harris, and Pope, and also a list of casualties in my division, amounting, in all, to one thousand nine hundred and fifty killed and wounded. My division was about seven thousand strong when it went into acti
me, and for the energy and promptness with which he delivered my orders. During the action he was wounded in five different places, but did not quit the field until entirely disabled. Lieut. Adams, Acting Adjutant of the Twenty-second Indiana, is also a worthy young officer. He had his horse shot from under him, and though sounded himself, he remained on the field, preserving great coolness and calmness of mind, and constantly urging his men forward. Also, much praise is due to Orderly Gray, for his courage, promptness, and energy in delivering my orders. Capt. Pinney, of the Fifth Wisconsin battery, cannot be spoken of too highly in this report. He delivered his orders with great coolness and deliberation, and his battery did great execution, in forcing the rebels from their position. The following is a list of casualties: Of the Twenty-second Indiana there were engaged three hundred. Killed, fifty-five; wounded, ninety-eight; missing, nineteen. Total loss, one hundre
Caleb Bates (search for this): chapter 138
division. For a favorable mention of other officers and men I refer you to reports of General Rousseau; also, to those of the Adjutant-Generals of Generals Jackson and Terrell, and Col. Webster. To my personal staff--Lieut.-Colonel J. V. Bomford, Sixteenth United States infantry, Lieut. Colonel E. Bassett Langdon, Inspector-General; Capt. J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. W. T. Hoblitzell, Aid-de-Camp; Lieut. S. W. Davies, Aid-de-Camp; Lieut. S. M. Hosea, Aid-de Camp; Major Caleb Bates, volunteer Aid-de-Camp; Captain N. H. Fisher, volunteer Aid-de-Camp; Captain James P. Collier, volunteer Aid-de-Camp, I return my thanks for their conspicuous gallantry and intelligence on the field of battle. Lieut.-Colonel Bomford was wounded twice, while posting a regiment in line. My orderlies, privates Isaac Bailey, Second Indiana cavalry; George Richardson, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Avery Graham, Thirty-fourth Illinois infantry; Henry Kline, First Ohio battery; Georg
lso reported to me after the fall of his chief, and behaved with coolness and bravery during the day. My casualties were very large. The nation is called upon to mourn the loss of such spirits as Jackson, Terrell, Webster, Jewett, Campbell, Berryhill, Herrell, and others, who fell upon this bloody field. A list of killed and wounded are herewith enclosed of Rousseau's and Jackson's divisions. All of which is respectfully submitted. Alexander McDowell McCook, Major-General Commanding FirsGeneral, Lieut. George A. Vandegrift, and Aids, and Lieuts. F. G. Fitzwilliam and H. E. Spencer, were of great service to me during the day, coolly and bravely carrying my orders to all parts of the field. Major Johnston, Tenth Wisconsin, Capt. Berryhill, Acting Major, Second Ohio, Captain John Herrel, Second Ohio, and Captain Drury, Ninety-fourth Ohio, fell, gallantly fighting at their posts. I thought proper to mention other regiments as they became attached to my command, during the prog
L. H. Rousseau (search for this): chapter 138
composed entirely of new troops, I ordered Gen. Rousseau's division to take the lead. Gen. Rousseatery) was halted on the hill in the rear. Gen. Rousseau soon sent me word that the enemy was reporrk's on the map.) I had previously ordered Gen. Rousseau to throw forward a line of skirmishers to retired from the field. I then informed General Rousseau that my instructions required me to reportely returned to my troops, and found that Gen. Rousseau had advanced the line on the right, occupys moment, was formed as follows: the right of Rousseau's division resting near the barn, on the righs brigade and Stone's and Bush's batteries of Rousseau's division were posted to the left and rear oor the number of troops engaged on our side. Rousseau had present on the field seven thousand men, undred. The battle was principally fought by Rousseau's division, and if there are, or ever were, bf killed and wounded are herewith enclosed of Rousseau's and Jackson's divisions. All of which is r[10 more...]
., Lieut. Rankin, of the Second Kansas regiment; Lieut. Andrews, of the Forty-second Illinois volunteers, and Lieutenant Wood, of the Signal Corps, for the able, gallant, and heroic manner in which they discharged their respective duties during the engagement, always ready and willing to take any risk or make any sacrifice for the good of their country's cause. Surgeon Hazlet, of the Fifty-ninth Illinois; Lieut.-Col. Keith, Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Johnson, Fifty-eighth Illinois; Lieut. Tolbert, Lieut. Ridler, and Captain R. K. Smith, of the Twenty-second Indiana; Lieut. Blean and Lieut. Eels, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, died gallantly defending the honor of their country's flag. On the morning of the ninth, a force of rebel cavalry was seen winding from the enemy's left, and evidently proceeding toward the Harrods-burgh turnpike. I directed Hotchkiss's battery to fire upon them, which was done with good effect, the enemy rapidly retreating. I then advanced with my di
ield, and the kind care he has taken of the wounded. Favorable mention is also made of Surgeons Marke, Tenth Wisconsin; Dixon, First Wisconsin; Williams, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio; Wright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania; Beckwith, Thirty-fifth Indiana; Sinnett, Ninety-fourth Ohio, and Fowler,----; Assistant-Surgeons Taft, One Hundred and First Ohio; Devendorf, First Wisconsin; Albright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania; Mitchell, Tenth Wisconsin; Reeve and Fuller, Twenty-first Wisconsin; and Shannon, Second Ohio. Major C. S. Cotter, First Ohio artillery, chief of that arm, behaved with conspicuous gallantry and good judgment during the entire action. He was, unfortunately, taken prisoner after dark. Captain Beverly D. Williams, Acting Quartermaster, was my guide during the entire day. The battle was fought near his birthplace, and he was of inestimable service to me. Lieut. M. P. Gratz, and volunteer Aid Henry Duncan, of Kentucky, of Jackson's staff, reported to me for duty, after
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