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R. Williamson (search for this): chapter 163
supposed, with considerable damage. The ram was pumping a heavy stream of water from her side, from three miles above the mouth of Yazoo River until she passed the fleet. The following are the casualties: Killed belonging to the Tyler — Oscar S. Davis, Third Assistant Engineer; T. Jeff. Hood, seaman. Wounded — John Sebastian, pilot, lost left arm; David Hiner, pilot, slightly; R. H. Smith, pilot, slightly; J. W. Holly, coal-heaver, lost right arm; J. J. Milford, seaman, severely; R. Williamson, seaman, severely; James Hughes, seaman, slightly; James Morris, seaman, slightly; Richard Carter, seaman, slightly; Fred. Cooper, seaman, slightly; Stephen Tracy, seaman, slightly. Killed belonging to detachment of Fourth Wisconsin regiment, detailed as sharp-shooters, on the United States gunboat Tyler--Capt. Lynn, company I, commanding detachment; F. Barton, company E; H. Randall, company B; L. Goodridge, company K; A. Palmer, company G; C. Shafer, company D. Wounded — C. Van Orma<
Henry Walke (search for this): chapter 163
et be given me to make a second attempt to destroy the Arkansas, as I believe it can be done, and I am ready and can do it. Very respectfully, your obed't servant, W. D. Porter, Commanding Division of the Fleet in the Western Waters. Commander Walke's report. gunboat Carondelet, July 15, 1862. sir: In obedience to your orders, passed to me yesterday by acting Fleet-Capt. Phelps, I got under way this morning, accompanied by the gunboat Tyler and steam-ram Queen of the West, and p-pipes were cut away, many of the hands jumped into the water. The gunboat Tyler sustained me in a gallant and effective manner. Our officers and most of the men behaved in a gallant manner during the whole action. Yours respectfully, Henry Walke, Commanding Carondelet. United States gunboat Tyler, Mississippi River, July 19, 1862. The following is an extract from the log of the Tyler, giving an account of the engagement with the Arkansas: From four to eight, clear and pleasant.
R. C. Tyler (search for this): chapter 163
estern Waters. Commander Walke's report. gunboat Carondelet, July 15, 1862. sir: In obedience to your orders, passed to me yesterday by acting Fleet-Capt. Phelps, I got under way this morning, accompanied by the gunboat Tyler and steam-ram Queen of the West, and proceeded up the Yazoo on a reconnoissance. We had proceeded about six miles up the river, when we discovered a formidable-looking rebel ram or gunboat, since proved to be the celebrated Arkansas. The Queen of the West, Tyler and Carondelet at once retreated down the river to avoid being inevitably sunk, firing upon her with our stern and occasionally with our side-guns. The enemy vigorously returned the fire from her heavy bow-guns as she pursued, and had greatly the advantage of us from being thoroughly protected by iron. We had continued the fight about one hour when the Arkansas came up, with the evident intention of running us down. I avoided the blow, and as we passed exchanged broadsides at very close q
s Hughes, seaman, slightly; James Morris, seaman, slightly; Richard Carter, seaman, slightly; Fred. Cooper, seaman, slightly; Stephen Tracy, seaman, slightly. Killed belonging to detachment of Fourth Wisconsin regiment, detailed as sharp-shooters, on the United States gunboat Tyler--Capt. Lynn, company I, commanding detachment; F. Barton, company E; H. Randall, company B; L. Goodridge, company K; A. Palmer, company G; C. Shafer, company D. Wounded — C. Van Ormand, company F, seriously; Peter Tuey, company F, seriously; W. Kent, company G, slightly; Anson Ayres, company E, slightly; J. Doyle, company K, slightly. Total killed, eight; total wounded, sixteen. For the last half-hour of the engagement the after part of the ship was full of steam, from the port escape-pipe having been cut. The vessel sustained no serious damage, although a good deal cut up, fourteen shot striking her, eleven of which penetrated the vessel. Baltimore American account. The following is a le
Stephen Tracy (search for this): chapter 163
e fleet. The following are the casualties: Killed belonging to the Tyler — Oscar S. Davis, Third Assistant Engineer; T. Jeff. Hood, seaman. Wounded — John Sebastian, pilot, lost left arm; David Hiner, pilot, slightly; R. H. Smith, pilot, slightly; J. W. Holly, coal-heaver, lost right arm; J. J. Milford, seaman, severely; R. Williamson, seaman, severely; James Hughes, seaman, slightly; James Morris, seaman, slightly; Richard Carter, seaman, slightly; Fred. Cooper, seaman, slightly; Stephen Tracy, seaman, slightly. Killed belonging to detachment of Fourth Wisconsin regiment, detailed as sharp-shooters, on the United States gunboat Tyler--Capt. Lynn, company I, commanding detachment; F. Barton, company E; H. Randall, company B; L. Goodridge, company K; A. Palmer, company G; C. Shafer, company D. Wounded — C. Van Ormand, company F, seriously; Peter Tuey, company F, seriously; W. Kent, company G, slightly; Anson Ayres, company E, slightly; J. Doyle, company K, slightly. Total<
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 163
ams were cut away, thirty timbers damaged, and three boats rendered useless. Our deck-pumps were cut away also. We had some thirty killed, wounded and missing. When the escape-pipes were cut away, many of the hands jumped into the water. The gunboat Tyler sustained me in a gallant and effective manner. Our officers and most of the men behaved in a gallant manner during the whole action. Yours respectfully, Henry Walke, Commanding Carondelet. United States gunboat Tyler, Mississippi River, July 19, 1862. The following is an extract from the log of the Tyler, giving an account of the engagement with the Arkansas: From four to eight, clear and pleasant. At four A. M. got under way, ran alongside of the Lancaster and sent a boat on board of her, which returned with a pilot. At five, stood on up the river, followed by the ram Queen of the West, the Carondelet being ahead. Arrived at the mouth of Yazoo River at forty-five minutes past five; stood on up. At seven A.
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
enter into a statement of all the circumstances connected with my running the blockade. At six A. M. on the morning of the fifteenth of July we heard heavy firing up the Yazoo, and as I had the evening previously taken on board two deserters from Vicksburgh, who had stated that the Arkansas ram was ready to come down the river, (they were sent on board the flag-ship Benton,) I suspected this vessel was making her way down, and I prepared for action. I beg to state that on my passage from Cairo to Vicksburgh, my port boiler had burst one of the bottom sheets, and we were repairing it at the time herein mentioned. At eight A. M. the United States gunboat Tyler came out of the mouth of the Yazoo, closely followed by the rebel ram. The former passed down and took refuge behind this vessel, as well as some other rams belonging to Colonel Ellet's fleet. As the Arkansas passed I discharged at her seven guns, striking her three times; one of my shot penetrated her iron covering and did
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
elating to this ship running the blockade at Vicksburgh. These facts will relate principally to thepreviously taken on board two deserters from Vicksburgh, who had stated that the Arkansas ram was reeg to state that on my passage from Cairo to Vicksburgh, my port boiler had burst one of the bottom however, reached in safety the batteries at Vicksburgh. It was now determined by the two commanderleans fleet that had previously attacked the Vicksburgh batteries, coming up-stream, concluded to ruthin range to bombard the upper batteries at Vicksburgh; the lower fleet under Flag-Officer Farragutcceeded in passing the fleet and in reaching Vicksburgh, although, it is supposed, with considerableford. United States steamer Hartford, below Vicksburgh, July 17, 1862. dear Father: The events oof the fourteenth instant two deserters from Vicksburgh came aboard and stated that the rebel ram Arretired, leaving the Arkansas to run down to Vicksburgh. The fleet below, which consisted of the [1 more...]
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
Doc. 152.-the Essex and Arkansas. Report of Commander Porter. United States gunboat Essex, off Baton Rouge, August 1, 1862. To the Honorable Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: Permit me to draw your attention to some facts relating to this ship running the blockade at Vicksburgh. These facts will relate principally to the manner in which she is plated; but in their detail it will be necessary to enter into a statement of all the circumstances connected with my running the blockade. At six A. M. on the morning of the fifteenth of July we heard heavy firing up the Yazoo, and as I had the evening previously taken on board two deserters from Vicksburgh, who had stated that the Arkansas ram was ready to come down the river, (they were sent on board the flag-ship Benton,) I suspected this vessel was making her way down, and I prepared for action. I beg to state that on my passage from Cairo to Vicksburgh, my port boiler had burst one of the bottom sheets, and we
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
Doc. 152.-the Essex and Arkansas. Report of Commander Porter. United States gunboat Essex, off Baton Rouge, August 1, 1862. To the Honorable Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: Permit me to draw your attention to some facts relating to this ship running the blockade at Vicksburgh. These facts will relate principally to the manner in which she is plated; but in their detail it will be necessary to enter into a statement of all the circumstances connected with my running the blockade. At six A. M. on the morning of the fifteenth of July we heard heavy firing up the Yazoo, and as I had the evening previously taken on board two deserters from Vicksburgh, who had stated that the Arkansas ram was ready to come down the river, (they were sent on board the flag-ship Benton,) I suspected this vessel was making her way down, and I prepared for action. I beg to state that on my passage from Cairo to Vicksburgh, my port boiler had burst one of the bottom sheets, and we w
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