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Andersonville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville, August 16. We have had the pleasure of an interview with Capt. J. H. Ferry, Quartermaster of General Morgan's division, who left the Gap at noon on Tuesday last, the twelfth instant, and he gives a full and explicit denial to the rebel reports of our reverses in that vicinity. Since the fight at Wallace's Cross-Roads, in the middle of July, there has been no regular engagement near the Gap until last Saturday, when Col. De Courcey went out on a foraging party with his whole brigade, consisting of the Sixteenth and Forty-second Ohio and Twenty-second Kentucky, Col. Lindsey, and the Fourteenth Kentucky, Col. Cochran, of Gen. Baird's division. Col. Cochran was in advance with his regiment, about a mile and a half beyond Tazewell, on picket-duty, when he was attacked by four rebel regiments under
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
was completely surrounded, they dexterously managed to bring him in to Colonel De Courcey. The rebels offered to exchange all the prisoners taken by them for their lieutenant-colonel, but the arrangements had not been completed when Captain Ferry left the Gap. Gen. Morgan issued orders complimenting Cols. Cochran and De Courcey and their men for their bravery, but it is universally conceded that to Col. Cochran belongs all the credit of the splendid repulse of the four rebel regiments. Atlanta Confederacy account. Morristown, August 8. The enemy has been met and defeated — in fact, routed; but it has not been as extensive an engagement as at first supposed; neither has there been the cutting to pieces of this regiment and that battalion, as stated. The fight was a gallant one while it lasted, which, according to the general's despatch, was about four hours. The enemy were getting bold in the vicinity of our forces, and was gradually extending his lines and committing dep
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
eCourcey four to one. The enemy lost two hundred and twenty-five, and Lieut.-Colonel Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee, was taken prisoner. We captured two hundred wagon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and mules. We lost three killed, fifteen wounded, and fifty prisoners. Two companies of the Sixteenth Ohio were surrounded by the rebel regiments, but two thirds of them cut their way through. John Morgan, at the head of two thousand cavalry, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville, August 16. We have had the pleasure of an interview with Capt. J. H. Ferry, Quartermaster of General Morgan's division, who left the Gap at noon on Tuesday last, the twelfth instant, and he gives a full and explicit denial to the rebel reports of our reverses in that vicinity. Since the fight at Wallace's Cross-Roads,
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
agon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and mules. We lost three killed, fifteen wounded, and fifty prisoners. Two companies of the Sixteenth Ohio were surrounded by the rebel regiments, but two thirds of them cut their way through. John Morgan, at the head of two thousand cavalry, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville, August 16. We have had the pleasure of an interview with Capt. J. H. Ferry, Quartermaster of General Morgan's division, who left the Gap at noon on Tuesday last, the twelfth instant, and he gives a full and explicit denial to the rebel reports of our reverses in that vicinity. Since the fight at Wallace's Cross-Roads, in the middle of July, there has been no regular engagement near the Gap until last Saturday, when Col. De Courcey went out on a foraging party with his whole brigade, c
Clinch River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
y of our forces, and was gradually extending his lines and committing depredations upon the property of private citizens; so Gen. Smith ordered an attack, to put a check upon his movements. The skirmish of Colonel Ashby's cavalry, some days ago, was the forerunner of a movement on him, and shout after shout went up from the ranks of men almost disheartened that our government would not let them have a brush. As I learned, the Third Georgia and Fourth Tennessee were in advance, and waded Clinch River, which, being swollen a little, came up to their arm-pits. It is impossible to draw the Yankees in a fair, open field fight, but they are always found in strong position, as in this instance. Two miles from and overlooking Tazewell, is a ridge called Waldren's, and is the scene of several little artillery duels between the opposing forces. Here Gen. Stevenson, with his brigade, consisting of the Eleventh Tennessee, Fourth Tennessee, Forty-second Georgia, Eighth Georgia battalion, and
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
's companies of the Sixteenth Ohio, who were cut off before they could fall back from picket-duty, on the main body. Lieut.-Col. Gordon, of the Eleventh rebel Tennessee regiment, was taken prisoner by two men of the Sixteenth Ohio, and though their company was completely surrounded, they dexterously managed to bring him in to Coin a few days over twenty miles in the enemy's front, and I should not be surprised if this affair, small as it appears to be, will cause General Morgan to leave Tennessee, and let his hoped for junction with Buell go by the board. The decisive battle of East-Tennessee is yet to come off, and Buell is now trying not to try --not t surprised if this affair, small as it appears to be, will cause General Morgan to leave Tennessee, and let his hoped for junction with Buell go by the board. The decisive battle of East-Tennessee is yet to come off, and Buell is now trying not to try --not to find out where to attack us, but how to avoid it and get safely away.
Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
Doc. 173.-battle of Tazewell, Tenn. General Morgan's despatch. August 9, 1862. To His Excellency Andrew Johnson: Governor: On the fifth and sixth instant, De Courcey's brigade, with the Fourteenth Kentucky, had a series of brilliant affairs with Stevenson's division in entire force. The enemy outnumbered DeCourcey four to one. The enemy lost two hundred and twenty-five, and Lieut.-Colonel Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee, was taken prisoner. We captured two hundred wagon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and mules. We lost three killed, fifteen wounded, and fifty prisoners. Two companies of the Sixteenth Ohio were surrounded by the rebel regiments, but two thirds of them cut their way through. John Morgan, at the head of two thousand cavalry, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville,
Tazewell, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
Doc. 173.-battle of Tazewell, Tenn. General Morgan's despatch. August 9, 1862. To His Excellency Andrew Johnson: Governor: On the fifth and sixth instant, De Courcey's brigade, with the Fourteenth Kentucky, had a series of brilliant aCol. Cochran, of Gen. Baird's division. Col. Cochran was in advance with his regiment, about a mile and a half beyond Tazewell, on picket-duty, when he was attacked by four rebel regiments under Col. Rains, comprising the Eleventh and Forty-secondir, open field fight, but they are always found in strong position, as in this instance. Two miles from and overlooking Tazewell, is a ridge called Waldren's, and is the scene of several little artillery duels between the opposing forces. Here Gen.and pray where now is heard the scream of Montgomery's eagle? The Federals fled to the Gap, and our forces now occupy Tazewell. They have advanced in a few days over twenty miles in the enemy's front, and I should not be surprised if this affair,
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
and Lieut.-Colonel Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee, was taken prisoner. We captured two hundred wagon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and mules. We lost three killed, fifteen wounded, and fifty prisoners. Two companies of the Sixteenth Ohio were surrounded by the rebel regiments, but two thirds of them cut their way through. John Morgan, at the head of two thousand cavalry, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville, August 16. We have had the pleasure of an interview with Capt. J. H. Ferry, Quartermaster of General Morgan's division, who left the Gap at noon on Tuesday last, the twelfth instant, and he gives a full and explicit denial to the rebel reports of our reverses in that vicinity. Since the fight at Wallace's Cross-Roads, in the middle of July, there has been no regular engagement near the
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 186
to one. The enemy lost two hundred and twenty-five, and Lieut.-Colonel Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee, was taken prisoner. We captured two hundred wagon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and mules. We lost three killed, fifteen wounded, and fifty prisoners. Two companies of the Sixteenth Ohio were surrounded by the rebel regiments, but two thirds of them cut their way through. John Morgan, at the head of two thousand cavalry, left Knoxville for Kingston about the second instant. It is rumored that Kentucky is to be invaded. Geo. W. Morgan, Brigadier-General. Louisville Journal account. Louisville, August 16. We have had the pleasure of an interview with Capt. J. H. Ferry, Quartermaster of General Morgan's division, who left the Gap at noon on Tuesday last, the twelfth instant, and he gives a full and explicit denial to the rebel reports of our reverses in that vicinity. Since the fight at Wallace's Cross-Roads, in the middle
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