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Sedalia, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 198
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two piens cheerfully in anticipation of meeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and shall march in an hour for Greenfield. James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official account of the battle. headquarters, Sedalia, Mo., August 24, 1862. Colonel Catherwood: sir: On tile morning of the fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment included) were sent out from Lexington, under command of Major Foster. We arrived in the vicinity of Lone Jack at
Greenfield (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 198
int yesterday at eleven o'clock A. M. My advance, under Col. Cloud, skirmished with their rear-guard during the day yesterday, killing and wounding several and taking a number of prisoners. Coffee is talking of forming a junction with Rains at Greenfield, and make a stand, which I hope they may do, as my command is much exhausted by forced marches, and stock badly used up. Since I left Fort Scott, my command has marched over two hundred miles and an average of forty miles per day without tents,s without subsistence, except as we could forage off the country, yet the men have borne their fatigue and privations cheerfully in anticipation of meeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and shall march in an hour for Greenfield. James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official account of the battle. headquarters, Sedalia, Mo., August 24, 1862. Colonel Catherwood: sir: On tile morning of the fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment
Lone Jack (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 198
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wouommand made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and Fd) were sent out from Lexington, under command of Major Foster. We arrived in the vicinity of Lone Jack at ten P. M. on the evening of the same day, where we learned that the enemy, two thousand fiv
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 198
ce they commenced their retreat except long enough to feed their horses, and crossed the Osage at this point yesterday at eleven o'clock A. M. My advance, under Col. Cloud, skirmished with their rear-guard during the day yesterday, killing and wounding several and taking a number of prisoners. Coffee is talking of forming a junction with Rains at Greenfield, and make a stand, which I hope they may do, as my command is much exhausted by forced marches, and stock badly used up. Since I left Fort Scott, my command has marched over two hundred miles and an average of forty miles per day without tents, and the last two days without subsistence, except as we could forage off the country, yet the men have borne their fatigue and privations cheerfully in anticipation of meeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and shall march in an hour for Greenfield. James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official account of the battle. headquarters, Sedalia, Mo., A
James S. Rains (search for this): chapter 198
of the shelter of heavy timber for a distance of six miles, crossed our trail in the rear, and made a precipitated flight south. They have never halted since they commenced their retreat except long enough to feed their horses, and crossed the Osage at this point yesterday at eleven o'clock A. M. My advance, under Col. Cloud, skirmished with their rear-guard during the day yesterday, killing and wounding several and taking a number of prisoners. Coffee is talking of forming a junction with Rains at Greenfield, and make a stand, which I hope they may do, as my command is much exhausted by forced marches, and stock badly used up. Since I left Fort Scott, my command has marched over two hundred miles and an average of forty miles per day without tents, and the last two days without subsistence, except as we could forage off the country, yet the men have borne their fatigue and privations cheerfully in anticipation of meeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and
James G. Blunt (search for this): chapter 198
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two piestence, except as we could forage off the country, yet the men have borne their fatigue and privations cheerfully in anticipation of meeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and shall march in an hour for Greenfield. James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official account of the battle. headquarters, Sedalia, Mo., August 24, 1862. Colonel Catherwood: sir: On tile morning of the fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment included) were
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wounded. Among the latter was Major Foster. Foster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and First Iowa cavalry and two pieces of artillery, threatened with an immediate attack by the whole rebel force, the rebel pickets being then in a part of
E. C. Catherwood (search for this): chapter 198
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieeeting the enemy. I arrived here at two o'clock this morning, and shall march in an hour for Greenfield. James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official account of the battle. headquarters, Sedalia, Mo., August 24, 1862. Colonel Catherwood: sir: On tile morning of the fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment included) were sent out from Lexington, under command of Major Foster. We arrived in the vicinity of Lone Jack at ten P. M. on the evening of the sa
J. Heron Foster (search for this): chapter 198
Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wounded. Among the latter was Major Foster. Foster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a coFoster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and First Iowa cavalry and two pieces of artillery, threatened with an immediate attack by the whole rebel force, the rebel pickets being then in a part of his camp; but on hearing of my approahe fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment included) were sent out from Lexington, under command of Major Foster. We arrived in the vicinity of Lone Jack at ten P. M. on the evening of the same day, where we learned that the enemy
Doc. 185.-the battle of Lone Jack, Mo. General Blunt's report. Col. E. C. Catherwood, Commanding, Sedalia: your despatch of this, the eighteenth, is just arrived. I came upon the united forces of Coffee, Hunter, Tracy, Jackman and Cockerhills, numbering four thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wounded. Among the latter was Major Foster. Foster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and First Iowa cavalry and two pieces of artillery, threatened with an immediate attack by the whole rebel force, the rebel pickets being then in a part of
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