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Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 204
Doc. 191.-fights at Fort Donelson, Tenn. Chaplain McKinney's account. Fort Donnelson, August 26, 1862. Eds. Com.: Yesterday at half-past 1 o'clock P. M., companies A, Capt. Carlin, B, Capt. McConnell, G, Capt. Moody, H, Capt. Le Blond, of the Seventy-first Ohio volunteer infantry, holding the post at Fort Donelson, wFort Donelson, were attacked by a guerrilla force under command of Colonel Woodward, numbering four hundred and fifty infantry and three hundred and twenty-five cavalry, so stated by him — Woodward — to Captain McConnell. The rebels played sharp on our pickets. They sent citizens, with revolvers concealed, who approached the pickets and asked pent our boys let slip a well-aimed shot of canister from our six-pounder, The six-pounder we used in the fight was left by the rebels at the surrender of Fort Donelson in March last. Its trunnions were broken off, and it was supposed to be useless. But our boys had it and the howitzer, which had also been demolished, hauled
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 204
some of them grazing the top of our breast-works, and others striking very close to some of the officers. As soon as the rebels were known to be in force in our immediate vicinity, a telegram was sent to Col. W. W. Lowe, commanding the post at Fort Henry and Hindman, and to whose command we are temporarily attached, informing him of the danger, and asking reinforcements. He promptly responded to our call by immediately marching at the head of six companies of cavalry and one field-piece. Theyulders — washed the stain of imputed cowardice from its skirts in the blood of the enemy. I cannot close this letter without mentioning the name of J. L. Davis, of company B. The enemy claimed to have cut the telegraph-wire between this and Fort Henry, and he feared they had intercepted our telegram for help. The question was: Who will run the gauntlet of the enemy's lines, (as they had us quite surrounded,) and carry a despatch to Colonel Lowe? Mr. Davis, though unable to walk without a c
A. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 204
es and the red tongues of flame were leaping from the windows and darting through the roofs. The sharp crack of rifled muskets, the heavy booming of our nine-inch* howitzer and six-pounder, the wild shouts of the combatants, and the roar of the consuming flames, made a scene of terrific sublimity. Seventeen houses were burned, and among them the court-house. Every commissioned officer did his whole duty truly and nobly. I ask leave to mention their names: Company A, Capt. Carlin and Lieuts. Williams and Simmons; company B, Capt. McConnell and Lieuts. Toms and Branden; company G, Capt. Moody and Lieut. Nichols; company H, Captain Le Blond, (Lieut. Gable, being very sick at the time, was not in the engagement.) What I have said of the commissioned officers is equally true of all the non-commissioned officers, and all the privates except four. Captain Moody, Lieuts. Toms, Branden, and Nichols, took guns and fought like soldiers in the ranks. Major Hart, commanding the forces, behaved
t Fort Donelson, Tenn. Chaplain McKinney's account. Fort Donnelson, August 26, 1862. Eds. Com.: Yesterday at half-past 1 o'clock P. M., companies A, Capt. Carlin, B, Capt. McConnell, G, Capt. Moody, H, Capt. Le Blond, of the Seventy-first Ohio volunteer infantry, holding the post at Fort Donelson, were attacked by a guees were burned, and among them the court-house. Every commissioned officer did his whole duty truly and nobly. I ask leave to mention their names: Company A, Capt. Carlin and Lieuts. Williams and Simmons; company B, Capt. McConnell and Lieuts. Toms and Branden; company G, Capt. Moody and Lieut. Nichols; company H, Captain Le BloMajor Hart, commanding the forces, behaved with coolness and gallantry. Capt. McConnell handled his men excellently, and behaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their posts and bore themselves like true soldiers as they are. Sergt.-Major McConnell, acting Adjutant, seized a musket and fought nobly.
Fort Donnelson, August 26, 1862. Eds. Com.: Yesterday at half-past 1 o'clock P. M., companies A, Capt. Carlin, B, Capt. McConnell, G, Capt. Moody, H, Capt. Le Blond, of the Seventy-first Ohio volunteer infantry, holding the post at Fort Donelson, were attacked by a guerrilla force under command of Colonel Woodward, numberCapt. Carlin and Lieuts. Williams and Simmons; company B, Capt. McConnell and Lieuts. Toms and Branden; company G, Capt. Moody and Lieut. Nichols; company H, Captain Le Blond, (Lieut. Gable, being very sick at the time, was not in the engagement.) What I have said of the commissioned officers is equally true of all the non-commissanding the forces, behaved with coolness and gallantry. Capt. McConnell handled his men excellently, and behaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their posts and bore themselves like true soldiers as they are. Sergt.-Major McConnell, acting Adjutant, seized a musket and fought nobly. The sutler, G
J. L. Davis (search for this): chapter 204
hiloh. I thank God that this detachment, at least, has flung that foul disgrace from its shoulders — washed the stain of imputed cowardice from its skirts in the blood of the enemy. I cannot close this letter without mentioning the name of J. L. Davis, of company B. The enemy claimed to have cut the telegraph-wire between this and Fort Henry, and he feared they had intercepted our telegram for help. The question was: Who will run the gauntlet of the enemy's lines, (as they had us quite surun the gauntlet of the enemy's lines, (as they had us quite surrounded,) and carry a despatch to Colonel Lowe? Mr. Davis, though unable to walk without a crutch, from a sprained ankle, promptly volunteered, and mounted and was off. It was heroic. He met Colonel Lowe's forces about three miles on their way. We captured a number of guns, and among them some of those the rebels took from our boys at Clarksville. Respectfully yours A. L. Mckinney, Chaplain Seventy-first Regiment O. V.I.
-inch* howitzer and six-pounder, the wild shouts of the combatants, and the roar of the consuming flames, made a scene of terrific sublimity. Seventeen houses were burned, and among them the court-house. Every commissioned officer did his whole duty truly and nobly. I ask leave to mention their names: Company A, Capt. Carlin and Lieuts. Williams and Simmons; company B, Capt. McConnell and Lieuts. Toms and Branden; company G, Capt. Moody and Lieut. Nichols; company H, Captain Le Blond, (Lieut. Gable, being very sick at the time, was not in the engagement.) What I have said of the commissioned officers is equally true of all the non-commissioned officers, and all the privates except four. Captain Moody, Lieuts. Toms, Branden, and Nichols, took guns and fought like soldiers in the ranks. Major Hart, commanding the forces, behaved with coolness and gallantry. Capt. McConnell handled his men excellently, and behaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their
Benjamin Hamilton (search for this): chapter 204
ehaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their posts and bore themselves like true soldiers as they are. Sergt.-Major McConnell, acting Adjutant, seized a musket and fought nobly. The sutler, George Steele, fired nine rounds. Mr. Pelton, his clerk, was in manfully. W. G. Nichols, Quartermaster's Sergeant, and William S. Wilson, Quartermaster's Clerk, with Enfield rifles in hand, did excellent service. And so did Geo. B. Frye, regimental post-master, and Ben. Hamilton, Adjutant's Clerk, using their Enfields with steadiness and accuracy. I name these gentlemen because they are regarded in the army as non-combatants, and yet in the hour of need were not found wanting. Our entire number in ranks during the engagement was one hundred and fifty-five, against seven hundred and eighty-five, according to Col. Woodward's own statement. From the time the enemy made the attack till he was repulsed and entirely driven off, was about one hour, though the sharp
John H. Patrick (search for this): chapter 204
rses went down with it. From fifteen to twenty of our men were killed and wounded; among them was the gallant Lieut. Summers, who was mortally wounded. The loss of the enemy is not known. Col. Lowe's forces, both men and horses, being jaded and suffering for food, returned to this post, after having waited more than an hour for the enemy to make an attack. The bearing of Col. Lowe's cavalry was without fault — brave. Col. Lowe commanded in person, and was cool and firm; and so was Lieut.-Col. Patrick. I have been somewhat lengthy in my account of the engagement of Monday last at this post, yet I hope you will publish it entire. You are fully aware of the odium that has been attached — we think unjustly — to the Seventy-first regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, in consequence of its reported conduct at the battle of Shiloh. I thank God that this detachment, at least, has flung that foul disgrace from its shoulders — washed the stain of imputed cowardice from its skirts in the b
xcept four. Captain Moody, Lieuts. Toms, Branden, and Nichols, took guns and fought like soldiers in the ranks. Major Hart, commanding the forces, behaved with coolness and gallantry. Capt. McConnell handled his men excellently, and behaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their posts and bore themselves like true soldiers as they are. Sergt.-Major McConnell, acting Adjutant, seized a musket and fought nobly. The sutler, George Steele, fired nine rounds. Mr. Pelton, his clerk, was in manfully. W. G. Nichols, Quartermaster's Sergeant, and William S. Wilson, Quartermaster's Clerk, with Enfield rifles in hand, did excellent service. And so did Geo. B. Frye, regimental post-master, and Ben. Hamilton, Adjutant's Clerk, using their Enfields with steadiness and accuracy. I name these gentlemen because they are regarded in the army as non-combatants, and yet in the hour of need were not found wanting. Our entire number in ranks during the engagement was
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