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Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 208
Doc. 195.-fight near Bolivar, Tenn. Colonel Crocker's report. headquarters Second division, District of Jackson, Bolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of SBolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of Staff: Colonel Leggett, commanding first brigade, was sent out by me this morning on the Grand Junction road with one regiment of his brigade, four companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, commandeer, Colonel Thirteenth Iowa Volunteers, Commhanding Second Division, District of Jackson, at Bolivar, Tenn. Report of Colonel Leggett. headquarters First brigade, Bolivar, Tenn., September 1,Bolivar, Tenn., September 1, 1862. Colonel M. M. Crocker, Commanding Post: I have the honor to report, that about seven o'clock A. M., of August thirtieth, I received from you, orders to take a portion of my command, one sectnfantry deployed in a piece of woodland on the Van Buren road, about five and a half miles from Bolivar, and briskly skirmishing with the enemy. I immediately discovered that we had been deceived as
Middleburgh (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 208
but sent it about a mile to the rear, to take a position at the junction of the Van Buren and Middleburgh road, and await reenforcement. About noon I discovered that the enemy were making a determined effort to flank us upon the right, and get to our rear upon the Middleburgh road. Leaving Col. Force in command on the Van Buren road, I took the two companies of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry and mounted infantry, and passed over the Middleburgh road, where we found the enemy advancing in large numbers. The infantry immediately dismounted and engaged the enemy with great vigor and determinventy-eighth Ohio. These four companies were at once deployed upon the right and left of the Middleburgh road, and engaged the enemy's skirmishers. The firing having ceased on the Van Buren road,icient guard to protect our left from a surprise, and bring the balance of his command to the Middleburgh road, where it was evident that the enemy were organizing for the purpose of making a determi
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 208
, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of Staff: Colonel Leggett, commanding first brigade, was sent out by me this morning on the Grand Junction road with one regiment of his brigade, four companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Hogg; two companies of the Second Illinois cavadiana battery, and two companies of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry, and drive back a force of rebel cavalry, reported to be about four hundred strong, upon the Grand Junction road and near our lines. Col. Force, of the Twentieth Ohio, having received information that a small rebel force was menacing our pickets, very properly tothe remainder of the Seventy-eighth Ohio to be ready to march at a moment's notice. The cavalry and artillery had orders to meet me at the picket-post on the Grand Junction road, but, on arriving at that point, I found that neither had got there. I left the infantry at that point under command of Col. Force, to escort the artill
Doc. 195.-fight near Bolivar, Tenn. Colonel Crocker's report. headquarters Second division, District of Jackson, Bolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of Staff: Colonel Leggett, commanding first brigade, was sent out by me this morning on the Grand Junction road with one regiment of his brigade, four companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Hogg; two companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, under command of Major Puterbaugh, and one section of artillery, with instructions to drive off a force of the enemy's cavalry, supposed to be one hundred and fifty strong, and reconnoitre the country. When arriving at the ground Col. Leggett at once became engaged with a large force of the enemy's cavalry. The engagement lasted about seven hours, mostly skirmishing, but occasionally becoming a hand-to-hand fight, our forces repelling charges of the enemy's cavalry. About four o'clock in the afternoon the enemy drew back,
e, of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry, were in the fight nearly all of the time, and exhibited great courage and gallantry. The Second Illinois cavalry was on the field so short a time, I can only particularize their commander, the lamented Lieut.-Col. Hogg. A braver, truer man never lifted his arm in defence of his country. He was brave to a fault, and fell while leading one of the most gallant cavalry charges of the present war. It is proper that I should make special mention of Adjutant E. N. Owen, Twentieth Ohio, and Adjutant H. S. Abbott, of the Seventy eighth Ohio, who acted as my Aids-de-Camp during the day, and regardless of personal danger, frequently went through showers of bullets in executing their orders. I may also say that the mounted infantry, or mule cavalry, proved an entire success. They prevented the enemy from flanking us at least twice during the battle. They move with the celerity of cavalry, yet fight as infantry. Our loss was five killed, eighteen
age inspired all who saw him. Major Fry, of the Twentieth Ohio, who commanded the advance when the attack was first made in the morning, was in the thickest of the fight all day. Lieut. Ayres, of the Twentieth Ohio, and Lieut. Munson, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, who together commanded the mounted infantry, and without whose efforts we must have lost the day. Lieut. Hills, Twentieth Ohio, displayed great energy and bravery in snatching our dead and wounded from the very hands of the enemy. Capt. Kaga and Lieut. Melick, of the Twentieth Ohio, for the adroit management of their companies, and their indomitable courage. Captain Chandler, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, whose coolness and bravery in manoeuvring the four companies under his command were observable by all who saw him. Capt. G. F. Wiles, Lieut. W. W. McCarty, and Second Lieutenants Roberts and Scales, all of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, are deserving of the highest praise for their personal valor, and for their skill in extricating
ed them unable to stand. It would be unjust, however, not to name Col. M. F. Force, of the Twentieth Ohio, whose coolness and courage inspired all who saw him. Major Fry, of the Twentieth Ohio, who commanded the advance when the attack was first made in the morning, was in the thickest of the fight all day. Lieut. Ayres, of the Twentieth Ohio, and Lieut. Munson, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, who together commanded the mounted infantry, and without whose efforts we must have lost the day. Lieut. Hills, Twentieth Ohio, displayed great energy and bravery in snatching our dead and wounded from the very hands of the enemy. Capt. Kaga and Lieut. Melick, of the Twentieth Ohio, for the adroit management of their companies, and their indomitable courage. Captain Chandler, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, whose coolness and bravery in manoeuvring the four companies under his command were observable by all who saw him. Capt. G. F. Wiles, Lieut. W. W. McCarty, and Second Lieutenants Roberts and Scal
G. F. Wiles (search for this): chapter 208
d infantry, and without whose efforts we must have lost the day. Lieut. Hills, Twentieth Ohio, displayed great energy and bravery in snatching our dead and wounded from the very hands of the enemy. Capt. Kaga and Lieut. Melick, of the Twentieth Ohio, for the adroit management of their companies, and their indomitable courage. Captain Chandler, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, whose coolness and bravery in manoeuvring the four companies under his command were observable by all who saw him. Capt. G. F. Wiles, Lieut. W. W. McCarty, and Second Lieutenants Roberts and Scales, all of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, are deserving of the highest praise for their personal valor, and for their skill in extricating their companies when entirely surrounded by the enemy. Major S. D. Puterbaugh and Capt Otto Funke, of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry, were in the fight nearly all of the time, and exhibited great courage and gallantry. The Second Illinois cavalry was on the field so short a time, I can only pa
M. M. Crocker (search for this): chapter 208
Doc. 195.-fight near Bolivar, Tenn. Colonel Crocker's report. headquarters Second division, District of Jackson, Bolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of Staff: Colonel Leggett, commanding first brigade, was sent out by me this morning on the Grand Junction road with one regiment of hr numbers, not only maintained their ground, but drove the enemy back. The force of the enemy engaged was seven regiments of cavalry. Yours, respectfully, M. M. Crocker, Colonel Thirteenth Iowa Volunteers, Commhanding Second Division, District of Jackson, at Bolivar, Tenn. Report of Colonel Leggett. headquarters First brigade, Bolivar, Tenn., September 1, 1862. Colonel M. M. Crocker, Commanding Post: I have the honor to report, that about seven o'clock A. M., of August thirtieth, I received from you, orders to take a portion of my command, one section of the Ninth Indiana battery, and two companies of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry, and driv
W. W. McCarty (search for this): chapter 208
out whose efforts we must have lost the day. Lieut. Hills, Twentieth Ohio, displayed great energy and bravery in snatching our dead and wounded from the very hands of the enemy. Capt. Kaga and Lieut. Melick, of the Twentieth Ohio, for the adroit management of their companies, and their indomitable courage. Captain Chandler, of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, whose coolness and bravery in manoeuvring the four companies under his command were observable by all who saw him. Capt. G. F. Wiles, Lieut. W. W. McCarty, and Second Lieutenants Roberts and Scales, all of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, are deserving of the highest praise for their personal valor, and for their skill in extricating their companies when entirely surrounded by the enemy. Major S. D. Puterbaugh and Capt Otto Funke, of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry, were in the fight nearly all of the time, and exhibited great courage and gallantry. The Second Illinois cavalry was on the field so short a time, I can only particularize their com
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