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mmanding Second Iowa Cavalry. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp near Farmington, Miss., May 10, 1862. Gen. Pope's little army have been chafing and edging up toward the enemy for ten days, several miles in advance of the main column. It is rather a remarkable fact that our army should have come from Fort Pillow all the way to this place, and then be ready for action so much in advance of the main army — which was said to be ready before we left the Mississippi River. On the eighth we made an armed reconnaissance in force upon the enemy, drove in his pickets, and took a peep at the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and some of the huge guns planted for its protection. We took headquarters in Farmington, run our telegraph wires to that ancient city of now one inhabitant — the town all finished fifty years ago — and spent rather a pleasant day in the reconnoitre. Our loss was small — but two killed and four wounded. We, however, met with the severe loss of our friend,
Doc. 24.-battle of Farmington, Miss. General Pope's report. near Farmington, May 9--P. M. To Major-General Halleck: the enemy, twenty thousand strong, drove in our pickets beyond Farmington, and advanced upon the brigade occupying the further side of the creek in front of my camp. The brigade held on for five hours, until finding them heavily pressed in front and on the flank, and that I could not sustain them without passing the creek with my whole force, which would have been contrary to your orders, and would have drawn on a general engagement, I withdrew them to this side in good order. The conduct of the troops was excellent, and the withdrawal was made by them very reluctantly. The enemy made a demonstration to cross, but abandoned the movement. Our loss is considerable, though I cannot yet tell how great. The enemy, being much exposed, suffered very severely-one of his batteries being completely disabled, and his infantry line having been driven back severa
f his batteries being completely disabled, and his infantry line having been driven back several times. My command are eager for the advance. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. Official report of Colonel Hatch. camp near Farmington, May 10. Lieutenant Marden, A. A.G. Brigade: I had the honor to report, complying with orders to report, with Second regiment to Gen. Granger. Did so, receiving instructions from Gen. Pope to report to General commanding the advance. I reported at tIt is healthy, well armed and disciplined, and supplied as few armies have been before. If it fails to gain victory, it will be difficult to imagine any troops we possess capable of succeeding. Richmond Dispatch account. Corinth, Miss., May 10. Hurrying forward to the scene, I found that our right wing, under command of Price and Van Dorn and Sturgis, had advanced beyond our intrenchments to Farmington, and were engaging the enemy advantageously. To convey a more perfect idea of
-Killed, 1 officer; wounded, 4 officers and 8 privates; 1 missing. Thirteenth Louisiana.--Wounded, 9 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Florida and C. G. Battery.--Wounded, 2 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Thirty-seventh Mississippi.--Wounded, 1 officer and 2 privates, accidentally. Twentieth Louisiana.--Wounded, 1 officer. and 4 privates. Hodgson's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Ducabel's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Houton's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. First Arkansas.--Wounded, 1 officer and 3 privates. Recapitulation.--Killed, 1 officer and 6 privates; wounded, 13 officers and 96 privates; 3 missing. Among the wounded were Lieut.-Col. Girard, who fell while gallantly leading his regiment, struck in the thigh with a Minie ball; Lieuts. Smith, McGowan, and Caldwell, of the Twenty-fifth Louisiana, were also wounded. Our wounded are all doing well. There are three thousand sick soldiers in the hospitals at Lynchburgh. --Memphis Appeal, May 17.
May 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 24
charges. Our loss will scarcely exceed fifty killed and wounded; fifty horses, as many wounded and unserviceable. Edward Hatch, Lieut.-Col. Commanding Second Iowa Cavalry. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp near Farmington, Miss., May 10, 1862. Gen. Pope's little army have been chafing and edging up toward the enemy for ten days, several miles in advance of the main column. It is rather a remarkable fact that our army should have come from Fort Pillow all the way to this place, . He is a thorough gentleman, in every way fitted for his position, as well by coolness as by his good common-sense, which make him a good adviser in army movements. O. W. N. Another account. General Pope's division, near Farmington, May 10, 1862. Yesterday we were treated to a battle here of considerable interest. Only the day before Gen. Pope's command made a reconnaissance towards Corinth, skirmished for several hours, and returned at night. Next morning, just as I had despatch
-Killed, 1 officer; wounded, 4 officers and 8 privates; 1 missing. Thirteenth Louisiana.--Wounded, 9 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Florida and C. G. Battery.--Wounded, 2 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Thirty-seventh Mississippi.--Wounded, 1 officer and 2 privates, accidentally. Twentieth Louisiana.--Wounded, 1 officer. and 4 privates. Hodgson's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Ducabel's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Houton's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. First Arkansas.--Wounded, 1 officer and 3 privates. Recapitulation.--Killed, 1 officer and 6 privates; wounded, 13 officers and 96 privates; 3 missing. Among the wounded were Lieut.-Col. Girard, who fell while gallantly leading his regiment, struck in the thigh with a Minie ball; Lieuts. Smith, McGowan, and Caldwell, of the Twenty-fifth Louisiana, were also wounded. Our wounded are all doing well. There are three thousand sick soldiers in the hospitals at Lynchburgh. --Memphis Appeal, May 17.
Doc. 24.-battle of Farmington, Miss. General Pope's report. near Farmington, May 9--P. M. To Major-General Halleck: the enemy, twenty thousand strong, drove in our pickets beyond Farmington, and advanced upon the brigade occupying the further side of the creek in front of my camp. The brigade held on for five hours, until finding them heavily pressed in front and on the flank, and that I could not sustain them without passing the creek with my whole force, which would have been contrary to your orders, and would have drawn on a general engagement, I withdrew them to this side in good order. The conduct of the troops was excellent, and the withdrawal was made by them very reluctantly. The enemy made a demonstration to cross, but abandoned the movement. Our loss is considerable, though I cannot yet tell how great. The enemy, being much exposed, suffered very severely-one of his batteries being completely disabled, and his infantry line having been driven back severa
Earl Van Dorn (search for this): chapter 24
y 10. Hurrying forward to the scene, I found that our right wing, under command of Price and Van Dorn and Sturgis, had advanced beyond our intrenchments to Farmington, and were engaging the enemy aeously. To convey a more perfect idea of the affair, I should observe that on Thursday night Van Dorn had placed himself so near the Federal front, on our right, that the pickets of the two forces ing a few moments to allow the confederates to form in their respective positions, a portion of Van Dorn's and Ruggles's divisions opened the ball. A Louisiana battery of six guns, under command of F entirely surround them. But, owing to the distance around, or the suddenness of the attack by Van Dorn, he was not in position in time; and the grand design failed. We, however, drove the enemy baced. Among the latter are Major Ingram, (mortally,) and Capt. Leftwitch, both of the staff of Gen. Van Dorn. rebel killed and wounded. A correspondent furnishes us with the official list of the
Eighteenth Louisiana.--Killed, 1; wounded, 12 privates. Thirty-sixth Mississippi.--Killed, 1 officer; wounded, 4 officers and 8 privates; 1 missing. Thirteenth Louisiana.--Wounded, 9 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Florida and C. G. Battery.--Wounded, 2 officers and 6 privates; 1 missing. Thirty-seventh Mississippi.--Wounded, 1 officer and 2 privates, accidentally. Twentieth Louisiana.--Wounded, 1 officer. and 4 privates. Hodgson's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Ducabel's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. Houton's Battery.--Wounded, 1 private. First Arkansas.--Wounded, 1 officer and 3 privates. Recapitulation.--Killed, 1 officer and 6 privates; wounded, 13 officers and 96 privates; 3 missing. Among the wounded were Lieut.-Col. Girard, who fell while gallantly leading his regiment, struck in the thigh with a Minie ball; Lieuts. Smith, McGowan, and Caldwell, of the Twenty-fifth Louisiana, were also wounded. Our wounded are all doing well. There a
right. The centre battery was fairly carried, the enemy limbering up his guns without taking them off the field. Finding our horses badly blown for a long charge over rough ground, going a distance of twelve hundred yards, and the infantry in great force, ordered all companies on the right to retreat to the right and rear, forming on the swamp road, and those on the left, to then join their command. The conduct of men and officers was in every respect commendatory. Captains Lundy and Egbert, Lieutenants Owen, Horton, Suetger, all had horses killed under them. There were about four hundred men in the charges. Our loss will scarcely exceed fifty killed and wounded; fifty horses, as many wounded and unserviceable. Edward Hatch, Lieut.-Col. Commanding Second Iowa Cavalry. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp near Farmington, Miss., May 10, 1862. Gen. Pope's little army have been chafing and edging up toward the enemy for ten days, several miles in advance of the main
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