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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them utates of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them utates of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ad, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, atates of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no lSouth-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The per on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
David Hunter (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them untates of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Edward W. Smith (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
April 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
May 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
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