hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
N. P. Banks 730 0 Browse Search
John Pope 730 6 Browse Search
United States (United States) 728 0 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 650 0 Browse Search
Doc 510 0 Browse Search
T. C. H. Smith 496 2 Browse Search
Centreville (Virginia, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
F. Sigel 460 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 436 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 388 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 180 total hits in 41 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
lice which separated us from the rebels. The approach is by a long and complete curve, in which the river runs, as at Columbus, right into the Chickasaw bluff, where the stream suddenly narrows until it becomes from two miles wide to nearly half aand bluff rises to the height of a hundred and fifty feet, and in general appearance is remarkably like the situation of Columbus, with the exception that the fortifications are placed lower down in the bend. It is impossible for any one who is athe most formidable guns, but also subjecting the enemy to the most conical fire in approaching the place. Stronger than Columbus by nature, it was equally well fortified by art. Twice stronger than Island No.10, for the reason that the approach was ined men could have successfully held it against ten times their number. As a defensible point it is even preferable to Columbus, and although more guns were mounted at Island No.10 than at Pillow, the former place will not compare with the latter e
Randolphs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
Doc. 54.-evacuation of Fort Pillow. Colonel Ellett's report. opposite Randolph, below Fort Pillow, June 5. Hon. E. M. Stanton: To my mortification the enemy evacuated Fort Pillow last night. They carried away or destroyed every thing valuable. Early this morning Lieut.-Col. Ellett and a few men in a yawl went ashore, followed immediately by Col. Fitch and a party of his command. The gunboats then came down and anchored across the channel. I proceeded with three rams twelve miles below the fort to a point opposite Randolph, and sent Lieut.-Col. Ellett ashore with a flag of truce to demand the surrender of the place. Their forces had all left in two of their gunboats only an hour or two before we approached. The people seemed to respect the flag which Lieut.-Col. Ellett planted. The guns had been dismantled and some piles of cotton were burning I shall leave Lieut.-Col. Ellett here in the advance, and return immediately to Fort Pillow to bring on my entire force
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
rces quickly appropriated to their use. All the barracks, houses, and stores in the place had been consumed previous to our departure. The quantity of shot and shell left behind was unusually small, and the magazines were entirely empty. The evacuation was complete, clean and entire, nothing worth the carriage was left behind. From a farmer, living three miles from the Fort, we learned that our land force had moved the day previous to our arrival to Mason's station, on the Memphis and Nashville road, where they would take the train to Corinth, as they said, not knowing that Corinth was in our hands. Before leaving they had assigned their stores to the residents as perquisites. A detachment of Fitch's men, finding them with large quantities of molasses, sugar, and provisions in their possession, ordered them to haul it to the Fort so soon as they discovered its origin, which the owner did. He professed to be a Union man, and had been in Memphis only three days previously. Th
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
life. The enemy is gone, quit, scampered, run away, unable to withstand the closing jaws of our fleets and armies ; he is panic-stricken and demoralized. While I write, the flaming bonfires of his stores, his quarters, are lighting the heavens, and the flashes of his guns bespeak his haste. Victory! The immediate occasion of this desperate and ruinous step on the part of the subjects of King Cotton is no doubt the fate of Corinth, but the real victory was gained on that dread day at Shiloh, when the few stout and loyal hearts and the active brains of our freemen held back the tide of rebellion by their determined and self-sacrificing spirit. Neither Corinth, nor Pillow, nor Memphis was safe after that crowning Sunday night. It became a question who should bring up the most men and resources for the next battle. We did it and the victory becomes bloodless in consequence. The exultation, the jubilee which this auspicious day will send to the hearts of thousands of our fellow-
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 54
us calibres. These works are of more recent construction. Besides this, there are on the heights, and in isolated positions near the top, excavations, behind which a single gun was mounted, or, more correctly speaking, dismounted. The plan of the rebels has evidently been to remove most of their best guns, and to shatter the rest by over-charges. A few of them have stood the test, and may be considered amply safe hereafter. Fort Pillow, named after the celebrated Gideon J. Pillow, of Mexican ditch and Fort Donelson notoriety, is an immense system of earthworks, situated on the first Chickasaw bluffs, sixty-five miles above Memphis, and one hundred and seventy-five below Cairo. The first fortifications were, as I learned from a native, commenced about a year ago, early in June, 1861, at the time when Memphis was in a ferment, and the secession of Tennessee was eagerly canvassed. The original design has been greatly enlarged, so that little or no trace of the original can be fo
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
orks are of more recent construction. Besides this, there are on the heights, and in isolated positions near the top, excavations, behind which a single gun was mounted, or, more correctly speaking, dismounted. The plan of the rebels has evidently been to remove most of their best guns, and to shatter the rest by over-charges. A few of them have stood the test, and may be considered amply safe hereafter. Fort Pillow, named after the celebrated Gideon J. Pillow, of Mexican ditch and Fort Donelson notoriety, is an immense system of earthworks, situated on the first Chickasaw bluffs, sixty-five miles above Memphis, and one hundred and seventy-five below Cairo. The first fortifications were, as I learned from a native, commenced about a year ago, early in June, 1861, at the time when Memphis was in a ferment, and the secession of Tennessee was eagerly canvassed. The original design has been greatly enlarged, so that little or no trace of the original can be found in the numerous a
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
half. He was, of course, satisfied of the evacuation, and determined upon landing early in the morning. Thursday, June 5. Early this morning the fleet got under way, and by sunrise our flag was waving from the heights of Fort Pillow. The rams under Col. Ellet, anxious, probably, to secure an equivocal notoriety in being the first to land in an abandoned fortress, proceeded with all speed down the bend, followed by the Benton and her gallant followers — Mound City, Cairo, Carondelet, Cincinnati, St. Louis and the transports and mortarfleet — until we had rounded the Craighead Point, so long the slice which separated us from the rebels. The approach is by a long and complete curve, in which the river runs, as at Columbus, right into the Chickasaw bluff, where the stream suddenly narrows until it becomes from two miles wide to nearly half a mile at the Fulton landing, just below the forts. The yellow sand bluff rises to the height of a hundred and fifty feet, and in general app
Mound City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
at the distance of a mile and a half. He was, of course, satisfied of the evacuation, and determined upon landing early in the morning. Thursday, June 5. Early this morning the fleet got under way, and by sunrise our flag was waving from the heights of Fort Pillow. The rams under Col. Ellet, anxious, probably, to secure an equivocal notoriety in being the first to land in an abandoned fortress, proceeded with all speed down the bend, followed by the Benton and her gallant followers — Mound City, Cairo, Carondelet, Cincinnati, St. Louis and the transports and mortarfleet — until we had rounded the Craighead Point, so long the slice which separated us from the rebels. The approach is by a long and complete curve, in which the river runs, as at Columbus, right into the Chickasaw bluff, where the stream suddenly narrows until it becomes from two miles wide to nearly half a mile at the Fulton landing, just below the forts. The yellow sand bluff rises to the height of a hundred and
Pillar (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
he Chickasaw Bluff, on which it stands, is from seventy-five to one hundred feet high, and is cut up by ravines in a most remarkable manner. Those who have only seen it from the river have no idea how broken, rough, rolling and rugged its surface is. Before the evacuation of the Fort, ten thousand determined men could have successfully held it against ten times their number. As a defensible point it is even preferable to Columbus, and although more guns were mounted at Island No.10 than at Pillow, the former place will not compare with the latter either in commanding position or strength. The work on Fort Pillow was begun on the thirteenth of April, 1861, and was prosecuted with great vigor during most of the summer of that year. From three to five thousand negroes, so I am informed by one of the natives, were employed upon it at one time. Its intrenchments in the rear are miles in length, and have been constructed under the superintendence of able engineers. Their counterscarp
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
orinth was in our hands. Before leaving they had assigned their stores to the residents as perquisites. A detachment of Fitch's men, finding them with large quantities of molasses, sugar, and provisions in their possession, ordered them to haul it to the Fort so soon as they discovered its origin, which the owner did. He professed to be a Union man, and had been in Memphis only three days previously. The evacuation of Corinth was not then known publicly, and our flotilla was still at Vicksburgh. Memphis he described as being deserted; gave some account of the history of the Fort from its commencement, in which he described the actions of the rebel commanders as exceedingly tyrannical. An intelligent contraband also backed up the asseverations of his master by various statements. He was anxious to get North, and declared himself fully persuaded of the superiority of the Lincoln cause. As the clear result of this masterly operation we have secured ten uninjured guns of variou
1 2 3 4 5