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Tar River (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
to march the troops out, and if possible, find and dislodge the enemy, who were reported to be in strong force near and beyond Tranter's Creek. The gunboat Picket, Capt. Nichols, was detailed to take part in the movement, and proceeded up the Tar River, shelling the woods as far up as Pactolus, twelve miles above Washington. His shells made scattering work along the river. Some of them fell into the rebel camp, and, it is reported, did them much damage. The soldiers were allowed a couplef Lieut. Avery. The infantry and artillery having taken up the line of march, formed a junction with the cavalry on the outskirts of the town, when all advanced along the Greenville road, while the gunboat Picket, Capt. Nichols, proceeded up Tar River, and shelled the woods ahead. We crossed Cherry Run, and reached Four Corners without any incident of note occurring, and without the slightest trace of the enemy. We were now a mile from Tranter's Creek, and as it was known that the bridge
Cherry Run, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
enty-fourth Massachusetts regiment, company I of the Third New-York cavalry, under command of Capt. Jocknick and Lieut. Allis, and a detachment from Col. Howard's marine artillery, under command of Lieut. Avery. The infantry and artillery having taken up the line of march, formed a junction with the cavalry on the outskirts of the town, when all advanced along the Greenville road, while the gunboat Picket, Capt. Nichols, proceeded up Tar River, and shelled the woods ahead. We crossed Cherry Run, and reached Four Corners without any incident of note occurring, and without the slightest trace of the enemy. We were now a mile from Tranter's Creek, and as it was known that the bridge on the main or Greenville road had been destroyed, the column took another road on the right, which crossed the creek a little distance higher up. The road near where it crosses the bridge, descends through a ravine or gorge, and turning suddenly to the left, skirts along by the edge of the creek, wh
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
a Inquirer, writing from Washington, N. C.; June sixth, gives the following particulars of the battle at that place: Since the rebel citizens of Washington fled from their homes upon the first approach of our gunboats, after the occupation of Newbern, they have labored in every way to render uncomfortable those who, like wiser men, staid at home and attended to their own business. Frequent threats have been made that the town would be recaptured, and all those who adhered to the Union causemmand of the rebel Col. Singletary; and Col. Potter, commanding the forces at Washington, deemed it proper to send for reinforcements. Accordingly, on Tuesday and Wednesday last, all the remaining companies of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts at Newbern were despatched to Washington. Lieut. Avery, of the marine artillery, with three of Wiard's twelve-pounder boat-howitzers, and a party of artillerists, accompanied the expedition. Our correspondent went up with the Massachusetts boys, and wa
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
ed even more effective service if they had been placed on the opposite side of the pond, out of rebel musket-range. Wagons were obtained from the farms near by, and the dead and wounded were conveyed back to Washington. The regiment started on the return at six o'clock, and reached town through a drenching rain at nine o'clock P. M. The following is a list of killed and wounded in the fight at Tranter's Creek: Twenty-Fourth Massachusetts. Sergeant George L. Litchfield, Co. A, Roxbury, Mass., killed; Private Leroy Dorland, Co. A, Palmer, Mass., killed; Private Orville Brock, Co. I, killed; Corporal Melbourn Croscrup, Co. F, Lynn, killed; Private Geo. H. Baxter, Co. F, Newtown, Mass., killed; Private Austin Gill, Co. K, killed; Wm. H. Moore, Captain of Gun, Marine Artillery, Chicago, Ill., killed; Lieut. Horatio Jarves, Co. A, wounded by ball through left ankle-joint; Capt. W. F. Redding, Co. A, wrist, slight; Private James A. Beal, Co. B, forehead, slight; Private Joseph A.
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
the farms near by, and the dead and wounded were conveyed back to Washington. The regiment started on the return at six o'clock, and reached town through a drenching rain at nine o'clock P. M. The following is a list of killed and wounded in the fight at Tranter's Creek: Twenty-Fourth Massachusetts. Sergeant George L. Litchfield, Co. A, Roxbury, Mass., killed; Private Leroy Dorland, Co. A, Palmer, Mass., killed; Private Orville Brock, Co. I, killed; Corporal Melbourn Croscrup, Co. F, Lynn, killed; Private Geo. H. Baxter, Co. F, Newtown, Mass., killed; Private Austin Gill, Co. K, killed; Wm. H. Moore, Captain of Gun, Marine Artillery, Chicago, Ill., killed; Lieut. Horatio Jarves, Co. A, wounded by ball through left ankle-joint; Capt. W. F. Redding, Co. A, wrist, slight; Private James A. Beal, Co. B, forehead, slight; Private Joseph A. Collins, Co. E, temple; Private John. Vaughn, Co. E, hip, severely; Private M. J. O'Brien, Co. I, bayonet wound; Private Wm. Reynolds, Co. I, sh
Palmer, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
on the opposite side of the pond, out of rebel musket-range. Wagons were obtained from the farms near by, and the dead and wounded were conveyed back to Washington. The regiment started on the return at six o'clock, and reached town through a drenching rain at nine o'clock P. M. The following is a list of killed and wounded in the fight at Tranter's Creek: Twenty-Fourth Massachusetts. Sergeant George L. Litchfield, Co. A, Roxbury, Mass., killed; Private Leroy Dorland, Co. A, Palmer, Mass., killed; Private Orville Brock, Co. I, killed; Corporal Melbourn Croscrup, Co. F, Lynn, killed; Private Geo. H. Baxter, Co. F, Newtown, Mass., killed; Private Austin Gill, Co. K, killed; Wm. H. Moore, Captain of Gun, Marine Artillery, Chicago, Ill., killed; Lieut. Horatio Jarves, Co. A, wounded by ball through left ankle-joint; Capt. W. F. Redding, Co. A, wrist, slight; Private James A. Beal, Co. B, forehead, slight; Private Joseph A. Collins, Co. E, temple; Private John. Vaughn, Co. E,
Greenville, North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
ent. The troops were commanded by Lieut.-Colonel Frank Osborn. Col. Potter, Military Governor of Washington, with Lieut. Pendleton and Assistant Surgeons Curtis and McGregor, also went along. The troops took the country road to Pactolus and Greenville. The day was oppressively hot and sultry, and several of the men gave out, being overcome by the labors of the march. We frequently halted to rest the men. Every where the slaves came from the fields in which they were employed, and leanin, and a detachment from Col. Howard's marine artillery, under command of Lieut. Avery. The infantry and artillery having taken up the line of march, formed a junction with the cavalry on the outskirts of the town, when all advanced along the Greenville road, while the gunboat Picket, Capt. Nichols, proceeded up Tar River, and shelled the woods ahead. We crossed Cherry Run, and reached Four Corners without any incident of note occurring, and without the slightest trace of the enemy. We wer
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
renching rain at nine o'clock P. M. The following is a list of killed and wounded in the fight at Tranter's Creek: Twenty-Fourth Massachusetts. Sergeant George L. Litchfield, Co. A, Roxbury, Mass., killed; Private Leroy Dorland, Co. A, Palmer, Mass., killed; Private Orville Brock, Co. I, killed; Corporal Melbourn Croscrup, Co. F, Lynn, killed; Private Geo. H. Baxter, Co. F, Newtown, Mass., killed; Private Austin Gill, Co. K, killed; Wm. H. Moore, Captain of Gun, Marine Artillery, Chicago, Ill., killed; Lieut. Horatio Jarves, Co. A, wounded by ball through left ankle-joint; Capt. W. F. Redding, Co. A, wrist, slight; Private James A. Beal, Co. B, forehead, slight; Private Joseph A. Collins, Co. E, temple; Private John. Vaughn, Co. E, hip, severely; Private M. J. O'Brien, Co. I, bayonet wound; Private Wm. Reynolds, Co. I, shoulder, slight; Private G. A. Howard, Co. I, hand, slight; Private Jas. Gibbon, marine artillery, flesh-wound, leg; Private William A. Clark, marine artiller
Tranter's Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 59
Doc. 59.-battle of Tranter's Creek, N. C. Fought June 5, 1862. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing from Washington, N. C.; June sixth, gives the following particulars of the battle at that place: Since the rebel citizens ofhe troops out, and if possible, find and dislodge the enemy, who were reported to be in strong force near and beyond Tranter's Creek. The gunboat Picket, Capt. Nichols, was detailed to take part in the movement, and proceeded up the Tar River, sheltown through a drenching rain at nine o'clock P. M. The following is a list of killed and wounded in the fight at Tranter's Creek: Twenty-Fourth Massachusetts. Sergeant George L. Litchfield, Co. A, Roxbury, Mass., killed; Private Leroy Dorlarners without any incident of note occurring, and without the slightest trace of the enemy. We were now a mile from Tranter's Creek, and as it was known that the bridge on the main or Greenville road had been destroyed, the column took another road
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 59
respondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing from Washington, N. C.; June sixth, gives the following particulars of the battle at that place: Since the rebel citizens of Washington fled from their homes upon the first approach of our gunboatsl. Singletary; and Col. Potter, commanding the forces at Washington, deemed it proper to send for reinforcements. Accordingwenty-fourth Massachusetts at Newbern were despatched to Washington. Lieut. Avery, of the marine artillery, with three of Wling the woods as far up as Pactolus, twelve miles above Washington. His shells made scattering work along the river. Some-Colonel Frank Osborn. Col. Potter, Military Governor of Washington, with Lieut. Pendleton and Assistant Surgeons Curtis and near by, and the dead and wounded were conveyed back to Washington. The regiment started on the return at six o'clock, andrtillery, neck and shoulder. Another account. Washington, N. C., June 7, 1862. During last week and the early part
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