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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
commissioned officers. Twenty companies of cavalry will be received, and thirty companies of infantry, with the right, on the part of the authorities, to assign one or more of the infantry companies for artillery service. Each volunteer must furnish his own gun, which will be valued and paid for by the State, or a certain amount paid for it monthly by the government for its use, as the State may ultimately determine. Companies organizing south of the Arkansas River will rendezvous at Little Rock, unless other instruction are given. Those organizing north of the river will be advised of the proper point to rendezvous by applying to the Military Board for orders. Transportation, subsistence, etc., etc., will be supplied upon application, for organized companies ; no company will be esteemed organized until a descriptive list is filed with the Military Board, showing the requisite number of men; certificates of election for company officers should accompany the descriptive list.
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
han ninety-six men, exclusive of commissioned officers. Twenty companies of cavalry will be received, and thirty companies of infantry, with the right, on the part of the authorities, to assign one or more of the infantry companies for artillery service. Each volunteer must furnish his own gun, which will be valued and paid for by the State, or a certain amount paid for it monthly by the government for its use, as the State may ultimately determine. Companies organizing south of the Arkansas River will rendezvous at Little Rock, unless other instruction are given. Those organizing north of the river will be advised of the proper point to rendezvous by applying to the Military Board for orders. Transportation, subsistence, etc., etc., will be supplied upon application, for organized companies ; no company will be esteemed organized until a descriptive list is filed with the Military Board, showing the requisite number of men; certificates of election for company officers should a
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Board whose duty it is to protect the State from invasion — whose right it is to call an army in the field when the confederate States refuse or neglect to protect the people, I call upon each and every man capable of bearing arms to prepare at once your representatives in convention assembled at the capital in May last, severed the State of Arkansas from the United States of America, upon the doctrine of State sovereignty, from which grew up the confederate States. This, in the retrospect, maconfederate States. This, in the retrospect, may be viewed no less a political right than a moral and political virtue. Looking to our happiness, and the transmission of republican liberty for the present age and future generations, an alliance was formed with the confederate States of America. confederate States of America. In the support of this government no star in the galaxy has shed a brighter lustre than Arkansas. No people have evinced more valor or a more self-sacrificing spirit, than hers in upholding confederate nationality. Every doorway is stained with t
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, little Rock, May 5, 1862. To the Freemen of Arkansas: Fellow-citizens: Again your authorities, luctant and powerful government. So if we of Arkansas are true to ourselves — true to our professio at the capital in May last, severed the State of Arkansas from the United States of America, upon in the galaxy has shed a brighter lustre than Arkansas. No people have evinced more valor or a moreeat West know it and prepare for the future. Arkansas lost, abandoned, subjugated, is not Arkansas Arkansas as she entered the confederate government. Nor will she remain Arkansas a confederate State, desolaArkansas a confederate State, desolated as a wilderness; her children fleeing from the wrath to come, will build them a new ark and launiews, it is by the Military Board of the State of Arkansas deemed essential for the public safety, many more than the number called for here in Arkansas who will not run a furrow this summer, nor doreach the south, unless staid by a rampart of Arkansas freemen. I am for defence — the Military Boa[1 more...]<
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
incapable of resistance, she will strike a blow for liberty, and continue to be free; if left to her fate she will carve a new destiny rather than be subjugated. It was for liberty she struck, and not for subordination to any created secondary power North or South. Her best friends are her natural allies, nearest at home, who will pulsate when she bleeds, whose utmost hope is not beyond her existence. If the arteries of the confederate heart do not permeate beyond the east bank of the Mississippi, let Southern Missourians, Arkansians, Texans, and the great West know it and prepare for the future. Arkansas lost, abandoned, subjugated, is not Arkansas as she entered the confederate government. Nor will she remain Arkansas a confederate State, desolated as a wilderness; her children fleeing from the wrath to come, will build them a new ark and launch it on new waters, seeking a haven somewhere, of equality, safety and rest. Be of good cheer, my countrymen, there is still a balm in
Abe Lincoln (search for this): chapter 6
s from the North--hireling mercenary cowards as they are, seeking to enslave us, that they may grow rich upon our substance, and divide us and our children as conquered subjects. This cannot, will not be — our people in the government of their choosing — in the sacredness of their persons — and defence of their property must be determined. We can and will defend it; unaided if it must be so, at every cost and sacrifice, rather than live under the domination of the detestable and execrable Lincoln government. The enemy upon our soil is crushing to earth the proud spirit of our people; presuming upon the temporary absence of many of our brave men, they seek to crush the energy and courage of the remainder. We will drive them from amongst us. Where there is a will there is always a way. An enlightened and brave people will never be subjugated. The armies of the revolution were at one time under George Washington, reduced to two thousand five hundred men; still with the blessings<
Doc. 6.-Governor Rector's address. office military board, little Rock, May 5, 1862. To the Freemen of Arkansas: Fellow-citizens: Again your authorities, charged with the duty of preserving and defending your State government, deem it imperatively necessary to call you to arms. Northern troops, formidable in numbers and preparation, are in the heart of your State, marching upon your capital, with the avowed purpose of perverting your government, plundering your people, eating your subsistence, and erecting over your heads as a final consummation, a despotic ruler the measure of whose power will be the hatred he bears his subjects. Will the thirty thousand freemen, capable of bearing arms, yet in Arkansas, look listlessly on, while chains are being riveted upon their limbs by a few thousand Hessians from the North--hireling mercenary cowards as they are, seeking to enslave us, that they may grow rich upon our substance, and divide us and our children as conquered subjects
George Washington (search for this): chapter 6
e, rather than live under the domination of the detestable and execrable Lincoln government. The enemy upon our soil is crushing to earth the proud spirit of our people; presuming upon the temporary absence of many of our brave men, they seek to crush the energy and courage of the remainder. We will drive them from amongst us. Where there is a will there is always a way. An enlightened and brave people will never be subjugated. The armies of the revolution were at one time under George Washington, reduced to two thousand five hundred men; still with the blessings of God and an undying spirit of resistance, the American colonies, each upon its own account, putting forth its entire energies, conquered a peace from a reluctant and powerful government. So if we of Arkansas are true to ourselves — true to our professions of hatred for the North, and devotion to the South--true in our devotion for constitutional liberty and free government, the sun will never set upon us a subjugate
H. M. Rector (search for this): chapter 6
Doc. 6.-Governor Rector's address. office military board, little Rock, May 5, 1862. To the Freemen of Arkansas: Fellow-citizens: Again your authorities, charged with the duty of preserving and defending your State government, deem it imperatively necessary to call you to arms. Northern troops, formidable in numbers and preparation, are in the heart of your State, marching upon your capital, with the avowed purpose of perverting your government, plundering your people, eating your suf trade, is measurably suspended, and money-making for a time ought to be. To be rich now, is impossible, for if one owned the whole State, it is worth nothing until freed. The wave of destruction has rolled over the north-east portion of the State, and will soon reach the south, unless staid by a rampart of Arkansas freemen. I am for defence — the Military Board is for defence, and if aided by the people, the State will be redeemed. H. M. Rector, Governor, and President of Military Board.
ld now, the State being invaded. The State, always sovereign, is sovereign yet, in her reserved rights, one of which is to defend her own soil — her own government — her own people, and to put every one, between certain ages, found in her borders, into the field, if necessary to do it. This is the law, State and national, and if it were not, the people in their potential power, would make it so. By your authority and sanction, your representatives in convention assembled at the capital in May last, severed the State of Arkansas from the United States of America, upon the doctrine of State sovereignty, from which grew up the confederate States. This, in the retrospect, may be viewed no less a political right than a moral and political virtue. Looking to our happiness, and the transmission of republican liberty for the present age and future generations, an alliance was formed with the confederate States of America. In the support of this government no star in the galaxy has shed
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