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Twentymile Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
is men to save themselves the best way they could. We have captured nine locomotives and a number of cars. One of the former is already repaired, and is running to-day. Several more will be in running order in two or three days. The result is all I could possibly desire. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. Gen. Pope did not push hard upon me with forty thousand men, thirty miles from Corinth on the fourth instant; for my troops occupied a defensive line in the rear of Twenty-Mile Creek less than twenty-five miles from Corinth until the eighth instant, when the want of good water induced me to retire at my leisure to a better position; moreover, if Gen. Pope had attempted at any time during the retreat from Corinth, to push hard upon me, I would have given him a lesson that would have checked his ardor, but he was careful to advance only after my troops had retired from each successive position. The retreat was conducted with great order and precision, doing much c
Booneville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
they were but few. Major-General Halleck must be a very credulous man to believe the absurd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make Beauregard frantic and ridiculous, especially when I expected to hear every moment of the capture of his marauding party, whose departure from Farmington had been communicated to me the day before, and I had given in consequence all necessary orders; but a part of my forces passed Booneville an hour before the arrival of Col. Elliott's command, and the other part arrived just in time to drive it away, and liberate the convalescents captured; unfortunately, however, not in time to save four of the sick, who were barbarously consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed that he got
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 73
73.-the retreat from Corinth, Miss. General Beauregard's letter. the following was published in the Mobile News of the nineteenth of June. headquarters of Western Department, June 17, 1862. gentlemen: My attention has just been called to the following despatch, (published in your issue of yesterday,) of Major-General Halleck, commanding enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect: that it contains as many misrepresentations as lines: Washington, June 5, 1862. The following despatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Corinth, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand prisoners and deserters from the enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
Doc. 73.-the retreat from Corinth, Miss. General Beauregard's letter. the following was published in the Mobile News of the nineteenth of June. headquarters of Western Department, June 17, 1862. gentlemen: My attention has just been called to the following despatch, (published in your issue of yesterday,) of Major-General Halleck, commanding enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect: that it contains as many misrepresentations as lines: Washington, June 5, 1862. The following despatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Corinth, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand prisoners and deserters from the enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learn
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
d were overlooked on account of the darkness. The actual number of prisoners taken during the retreat was about equal on both sides, and they were but few. Major-General Halleck must be a very credulous man to believe the absurd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make Beauregard frantic and ridiculous, especially when I expected to hear every moment of the capture of his marauding party, whose departure from Farmington had been communicated to me the day before, and I had given in consequence all necessary orders; but a part of my forces passed Booneville an hour before the arrival of Col. Elliott's command, and the other part arrived just in time to drive it away, and liberate the convalescents captured; unfortunately, however, not in time to save four of the sick, who were barbarously consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen.
Henry H. Elliott (search for this): chapter 73
he enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themselves the best way they could. We have captured nine locomotivcommunicated to me the day before, and I had given in consequence all necessary orders; but a part of my forces passed Booneville an hour before the arrival of Col. Elliott's command, and the other part arrived just in time to drive it away, and liberate the convalescents captured; unfortunately, however, not in time to save four of the sick, who were barbarously consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed that he got seven engines in a damaged condition, t
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 73
Doc. 73.-the retreat from Corinth, Miss. General Beauregard's letter. the following was published in the Mobile News of the nineteenth of June. headquarters of Western Department, June 17, 1862. gentlemen: My attention has just been callfteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themrd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make Beauregard frantic and ridiculous, especially when I expected to hear every moment of the capture of his marauding party, whose des to be seen whether his government and people are of the like opinion. I attest that all we lost at Corinth, and during the retreat, would not amount to one day's expenses of his army. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard.
s afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Corinth, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand porder in two or three days. The result is all I could possibly desire. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. Gen. Pope did not push hard upon me with forty thousand men, thirty miles from Corinth on the fourth instant; for my troops occupl the eighth instant, when the want of good water induced me to retire at my leisure to a better position; moreover, if Gen. Pope had attempted at any time during the retreat from Corinth, to push hard upon me, I would have given him a lesson that wd men under my orders, and must be looked upon in every respect by the country as equivalent to a brilliant victory. Gen. Pope must certainly have dreamed of having taken ten thousand prisoners and fifteen thousand stand of arms, for we positivel
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 73
entlemen: My attention has just been called to the following despatch, (published in your issue of yesterday,) of Major-General Halleck, commanding enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect: that it containsnes: Washington, June 5, 1862. The following despatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty mile The actual number of prisoners taken during the retreat was about equal on both sides, and they were but few. Major-General Halleck must be a very credulous man to believe the absurd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of twsly consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed
Doc. 73.-the retreat from Corinth, Miss. General Beauregard's letter. the following was published in the Mobile News of the nineteenth of June. headquarters of Western Department, June 17, 1862. gentlemen: My attention has just been called to the following despatch, (published in your issue of yesterday,) of Major-General Halleck, commanding enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect: that it contains as many misrepresentations as lines: Washington, June 5, 1862. The following despatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Gen. Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Corinth, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand prisoners and deserters from the enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard lear
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