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Greensburg (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of June, to make such reconnoissance as in my opinion seemed best. Following the Greensburgh road nineteen miles, we crossed to the Camp Moore road by an unfrequented path, distance six miles. Nine miles from where this path intersected the lastnamed road we breakfasted and fed our horses. At eight o'clock A. M. we resumed our march taking to the woods. Two of the prisoners were members of Capt. Terrill's Mississippi cavalry, and well armed. I learned that he, with his company of one hundred and ten men, was encamped at Williams's Bridge, across the Amite River, on the Greensburgh road, eight miles distant. I determined to surprise him and destroy his camp. The camp is only a mile from the Clinton road. There are three bridges to cross on the Port Hudson road, before reaching the camp, the furthest not more than half
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. Lieutenant-Colonel Keith's official report. camp Twenty-First Indiana volunteers, Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of June, to make such reconnoissance as in my opinion seemed best. Following the Greensburgh road nineteen miles, we crossed to the Camp Moore road by an unfrequented path, distance six miles. Nine miles from where this path intersected the lastnamed road we breakfasted and fed our horses. At eight o'clock A. M. we resumed our march twelve miles further, in the direction of Camp Moore; then we crossed to the Greenburgh road, capturing on the way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we capture
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
e way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we captured three prisoners and the horse of a fourth, who escaped, under fire, by taking to the woods. Two of the prisoners were members of Capt. Terrill's Mississippi cavalry, and well armed. I learned that he, with his company of one hundred and ten men, was encamped at Williams's Bridge, across the Amite River, on the Greensburgh road, eight miles distant. I determined to surprise him and destroy his camp. The camp is only a mile from the Clinton road. There are three bridges to cross on the Port Hudson road, before reaching the camp, the furthest not more than half a mile removed. On reaching the first bridge I left Capt. McGee in the rear with instructions, and with twenty men pushed rapidly forward. We saw no pickets until we reached the Amite bridge, (the last one.) These we hailed by my advance. They fled without giving any alarm. One shot was fired after them, when one of them was seen to fall. Seventy rods from the br
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
three prisoners and the horse of a fourth, who escaped, under fire, by taking to the woods. Two of the prisoners were members of Capt. Terrill's Mississippi cavalry, and well armed. I learned that he, with his company of one hundred and ten men, was encamped at Williams's Bridge, across the Amite River, on the Greensburgh road, eight miles distant. I determined to surprise him and destroy his camp. The camp is only a mile from the Clinton road. There are three bridges to cross on the Port Hudson road, before reaching the camp, the furthest not more than half a mile removed. On reaching the first bridge I left Capt. McGee in the rear with instructions, and with twenty men pushed rapidly forward. We saw no pickets until we reached the Amite bridge, (the last one.) These we hailed by my advance. They fled without giving any alarm. One shot was fired after them, when one of them was seen to fall. Seventy rods from the bridge we were brought in front of the encampment. Here we
Amite River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
clock A. M. we resumed our march twelve miles further, in the direction of Camp Moore; then we crossed to the Greenburgh road, capturing on the way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we captured three prisoners and the horse of a fourth, who escaped, under fire, by taking to the woods. Two of the prisoners were members of Capt. Terrill's Mississippi cavalry, and well armed. I learned that he, with his company of one hundred and ten men, was encamped at Williams's Bridge, across the Amite River, on the Greensburgh road, eight miles distant. I determined to surprise him and destroy his camp. The camp is only a mile from the Clinton road. There are three bridges to cross on the Port Hudson road, before reaching the camp, the furthest not more than half a mile removed. On reaching the first bridge I left Capt. McGee in the rear with instructions, and with twenty men pushed rapidly forward. We saw no pickets until we reached the Amite bridge, (the last one.) These we hailed by m
John A. Keith (search for this): chapter 87
Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. Lieutenant-Colonel Keith's official report. camp Twenty-First Indiana volunteers, Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of in allaying the panic which for a moment prevailed among some of his men at that time. Too much credit cannot be given Sergeants Marshall and Parsons, private Miller, and Sergeant Brown for their courage and brave conduct in receiving the two volleys in the camp of the enemy, and their subsequent conduct that night. Trusting that my action in the premises may meet your approbation, I am, with respect, your obedient servant, John A. Keith, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers.
James J. Clark (search for this): chapter 87
Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. Lieutenant-Colonel Keith's official report. camp Twenty-First Indiana volunteers, Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of June, to make such reconnoissance as in my opinion seemed best. Following the Greensburgh road nineteen miles, we crossed to the Camp Moore road by an unfrequented path, distance six miles. Nine miles from where this path intersected the lastnamed road we breakfasted and fed our horses. At eight o'clock A. M. we resumed our march twelve miles further, in the direction of Camp Moore; then we crossed to the Greenburgh road, capturing on the way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we capture
Humphrey Marshall (search for this): chapter 87
ashing across the bridge with the reserve. Seeing this, the enemy fled precipitately under our fire. The Captain's arrival was well timed, for every man with me had discharged his shots. Six of us fired over thirty shots. Our loss was Sergeant Marshall, wounded in the thigh, badly, and one horse killed. The enemy's loss is not certainly known, but was at least four killed, seven prisoners, twenty horses, three mules, and a wagon laden with provisions and forage, besides a quantity of arm attacked first by the enemy, and also for his coolness during the time we were under fire at night, and for his efforts in allaying the panic which for a moment prevailed among some of his men at that time. Too much credit cannot be given Sergeants Marshall and Parsons, private Miller, and Sergeant Brown for their courage and brave conduct in receiving the two volleys in the camp of the enemy, and their subsequent conduct that night. Trusting that my action in the premises may meet your appro
James W. McMillin (search for this): chapter 87
Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. Lieutenant-Colonel Keith's official report. camp Twenty-First Indiana volunteers, Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of June, to make such reconnoissance as in my opinion seemed best. Following the Greensburgh road nineteen miles, we crossed to the Camp Moore road by an unfrequented path, distance six miles. Nine miles from where this path intersected the lastnamed road we breakfasted and fed our horses. At eight o'clock A. M. we resumed our march twelve miles further, in the direction of Camp Moore; then we crossed to the Greenburgh road, capturing on the way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we captured
Oliver S. Locke (search for this): chapter 87
uriously. For a while the men seemed panic-stricken, but in five minutes time we were in a condition to receive an attack, if any was contemplated, which we fully expected. In the mean time we ascertained that the enemy fled upon delivering the second volley, which was done within fifteen seconds after the first volley. We gathered up our killed and wounded and encamped in the field opposite the woods. Our loss was two killed--Hammon D. Wagner and Joseph Shoener. The wounded were Oliver S. Locke, George Haynes, John Buckner, and Daniel Borne, together with a negro whom we captured in camp, and who has since died from the effect of his wounds. Seven of the prisoners escaped. Two of the guard over them were killed, and two had their horses shot under them, and two others were wounded. Four of our horses were killed, among them my own. We were not further molested, and at sunrise resumed our march, reaching camp at half-past 11 o'clock on the morning of the twenty-ninth inst
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