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rt. Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-third brigade, yet as Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden and the other officers of his command have been captured and forwarded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of the eleventh inst., coming down on the same train with Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden, the newly-appointed commander of the post, and found that several material changes had been made in the location and encampment of the Twenty-third brigade since my departure. Instead of camping together, as it had done, it was separated into two portions several miles apart. The brigade had never been drilled as such, nor a brigade guard mounted. Each regiment furnished its quota of officers and men, and watched cer
, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men,r, freely lavished his passes upon every rebel applicant, thereby giving the enemy knowledge of our exact location and strength, and enabling him to strike successfully at us when we were illy prepared to receive the blow. On the evening of the twelfth, a negro came into camp with the startling intelligence that he had discovered three thousand cavalry, encamped on the Woodbury pike, about six miles from Murfreesboro. This important information was received like all other negro news, and our
ded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of try to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana r
April 28th (search for this): chapter 92
erence to those who are blamable, especially the officers highest in command, cannot be determined without further investigation. In contrast to this shameful affair, the General commanding takes pleasure in making honorable mention of the conduct of a detachment of twenty-two men of companies I and H, Tenth Wisconsin regiment, under the command of Sergeants W. Nelson and A. H. Makisson. The detachment was on duty guarding a bridge east of Huntsville, when it was attacked, on the twenty-eighth of April, by a force of some two or three hundred cavalry, which it fought for two hours, and repulsed in the most signal manner. Such is the conduct that duty and honor demand of every soldier; and this example is worthy of imitation by higher officers and larger commands. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring th
ttributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn of the quiet Sabbath found the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro. Being halted here for a few minutes the arms were examined and the plan of attack agreed
f Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn
July 21st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 92
ame day, I was made prisoner by Brig.-Gen. Forrest, but in my then helpless condition was released upon my parole not to bear arms against the confederate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana regiment, and consisting of six companies of the Ninth Michigan, nine companies of the Third Minnesota, two sections of Hewitt's Kentucky battery, four companies of the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, and three companies of the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, was captured at that place by a force of the enemy's cavalry, variously estimated at from eightee
July 23rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 92
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-third brigade, yet as Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden and the other officers of his command have been captured and forwarded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of the eleventh inst., coming down on the same train with Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden, the newly-appointed commander of the post, and found that several material changes had been made in the location and encampment of the Twenty-third brigade since my departure. Instead of camping together, as it had done, it was separated into two portions several miles apart. The brigade had never been drilled as such, nor a brigade guard m
July 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 92
duty guarding a bridge east of Huntsville, when it was attacked, on the twenty-eighth of April, by a force of some two or three hundred cavalry, which it fought for two hours, and repulsed in the most signal manner. Such is the conduct that duty and honor demand of every soldier; and this example is worthy of imitation by higher officers and larger commands. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring the country, and so effectual had their labors proved that they had filled Murfreesboro jail with rebel prisoners. Many of these prisoners had violated their oaths, and expiate their crime on the gallows. In view of this appalling fact, their sympathizing neighbors exhausted every scheme to effect their escape. They improved every favorable opportunity to carry intelligence to the enemy, and implore him to resc
Hiram Barrows (search for this): chapter 92
the first alarm left his quarters, abandoned his company, and fled from his command under the enemy's fire, and I therefore enclose you herewith charges preferred against him for violation of the fifty-second Article of War. Capt. Charles V. De Land, company C, Ninth Michigan volunteers, deserves especial mention for cool and gallant conduct throughout the entire action, and the fearless mode in which he led his company as skirmishers in pursuit of the enemy when repulsed. Also First Lieut. Hiram Barrows, of company A, same regiment, for the tenacity with which he held his ground, although sorely pressed by the enemy. The loss of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers has been very severe for the number engaged, amounting to one officer and twelve men killed, and three officers and seventy-five wounded. The enemy's loss has been much more severe than our own. More than double the number of their dead were buried with ours, and their wounded are found in almost every hou
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