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J. J. Wright (search for this): chapter 92
ent at the subsequent surrender of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers, under Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, I can only state the facts as reported to me, which show that this force, isolated and reduced by killed and wounded to less than seventy-five men, after having held their ground from four A. M. to one P. M., were compelled to surrender or be cut to pieces by the entire force of the enemy. I am reliably informed that company B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, under command of First Lieut. Wright, held the Court-House against an incessant attack by a greatly superior force, from four A. M. to half-past 7 A. M., and did not surrender till the enemy had possession of the lower story of the building, and had started a fire with the evident intention of burning them out. Of the surrender of the Third Minnesota volunteers, and Hewitt's battery, under command of Col. Lester, I cannot speak from personal knowledge, nor have I received any information from sources sufficiently reli
John A. Wharton (search for this): chapter 92
onsisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. Thege in good earnest. Colonel Forrest had assigned the attack on the first encampment to Col. John A. Wharton and his daring rangers, together with Colonel Lawton and the Second Georgia cavalry, whilwoke the still morning with their usual terrific yell, which enlivened the charge; and when Colonel Wharton, at the head of the column, reached the point where he was to turn to the right, he led hisge. Among these Lieut. Chase was killed, and George Duffield was severely wounded. He gives Col. Wharton credit for shooting him, and then pays him a well-merited compliment in saying that he is the called and danger was to be met. He was cool on all occasions, and a stranger to fear. Upon Col. Wharton was conferred the honor of bringing the prisoners through to this city, where they arrived sa
Francis A. Walker (search for this): chapter 92
d and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm rible havoc upon the enemy. During one of these foot charges, the colonel, being mounted and leading his intrepid band, received a severe flesh-wound in his arm. But, nothing daunted, he still retained command until some time after, when Lieut.-Colonel Walker came up, when he turned it over to him. He soon effected a union with the remainder of the regiment, and with Major Thomas Harrison, led until the final surrender at eleven o'clock. During these four bloody hours, this small number, so
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-third brigade, yet as Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden and the other officers of his command have been captured and forwarded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of the eleventh tory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn of the quiet Sabbath found the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro.
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro,Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-thh Michigan volunteers. The force then at Murfreesboro was as follows: Five companies Ninth Michig total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Cad their labors proved that they had filled Murfreesboro jail with rebel prisoners. Many of these p on the Woodbury pike, about six miles from Murfreesboro. This important information was received l the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro. Being halted here for a few minutes the aor home, happiness and liberty, then should Murfreesboro be inscribed in golden letters upon their b
Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
effective men, a battery of four guns to support them, and lost one killed and seven wounded. The sick and wounded officers were all paroled on the spot, the rest were marched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital and evade the parole. I shall soon join my company, which is now located in Tallahassee, with four others, under the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rang
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
nt servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at MurfreesbHuntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana regiment, and consisting of six companies of the Ninth Michigan, nine companies of the Third Minnesota, two sections of Hewitt's Kentucky battery, four companies of the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, and three companies of the Seventh Pennsylvani companies I and H, Tenth Wisconsin regiment, under the command of Sergeants W. Nelson and A. H. Makisson. The detachment was on duty guarding a bridge east of Huntsville, when it was attacked, on the twenty-eighth of April, by a force of some two or three hundred cavalry, which it fought for two hours, and repulsed in the most s
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 92
, the other through the left thigh. These, although bleeding profusely and very painful, did not prevent me from remaining on the field with my own regiment, until the attack was repulsed; when, fainting from pain and loss of blood, I was carried from the field, and was, therefore, not a witness of what subsequently occurred. At noon of the same day, I was made prisoner by Brig.-Gen. Forrest, but in my then helpless condition was released upon my parole not to bear arms against the confederate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana r
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm was given before the head of their column reached our pickets, about a mile distant, so that our men were formed and ready to receive them, although they came in at full speed. The Texans and a battalion of the Georgia regimen
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