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Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles
Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
effective men, a battery of four guns to support them, and lost one killed and seven wounded. The sick and wounded officers were all paroled on the spot, the rest were marched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital and evade the parole. I shall soon join my company, which is now located in Tallahassee, with four others, under the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rang
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-third brigade, yet as Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden and the other officers of his command have been captured and forwarded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of the eleventh tory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn of the quiet Sabbath found the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro.
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
his duty. Among the most active and daring, and at the same time most conspicuous, was Adjutant Royston, whose chivalric bearing was observed wherever duty called and danger was to be met. He was cool on all occasions, and a stranger to fear. Upon Col. Wharton was conferred the honor of bringing the prisoners through to this city, where they arrived safely to-day. He was accompanied by company B, of the Texan rangers. Among the forty-five officers is found Gen. T. T. Crittenden, of Indiana, with one colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, one major, eleven captains and twenty-nine lieutenants. Col. Forrest had previously paroled about eleven hundred privates. Over three hundred mules and horses, with some fifty wagons, were captured. With these a splendid lot of arms, some ammunition, stores, etc. A large amount of quartermaster and commissary stores was destroyed. In brief, every thing was brought away or destroyed, thus making a clean sweep. It was a complete surprise to the
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
check the fugitives for a space of seven miles; and Col. Lawton, commanding the Georgia regiment, was subsequently arrested by General Forrest for misconduct under the fire of the enemy. During this attack, both officers and men, with one single exception, behaved very handsomely. There was no excitement, no hurry, no confusion; every thing was done calmly, quietly, and in obedience to orders. But it is with the deepest shame and mortification I am compelled to report that one officer of Michigan has been guilty of gross cowardice in the face of the enemy. Capt. John A. Taner, of company K, Ninth Michigan volunteers, at the first alarm left his quarters, abandoned his company, and fled from his command under the enemy's fire, and I therefore enclose you herewith charges preferred against him for violation of the fifty-second Article of War. Capt. Charles V. De Land, company C, Ninth Michigan volunteers, deserves especial mention for cool and gallant conduct throughout the entire
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
nd cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm was given before the head of their column reached our pickets, about a mile distant, so that our men were formed and ready tes and horses, with some fifty wagons, were captured. With these a splendid lot of arms, some ammunition, stores, etc. A large amount of quartermaster and commissary stores was destroyed. In brief, every thing was brought away or destroyed, thus making a clean sweep. It was a complete surprise to the enemy and a perfect success for our cavalry. We hope that many such may follow in quick succession, until Tennessee shall be delivered from the power of the oppressor, and be once more free.
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
e him to desist from this cowardly act, but to no purpose; he and some of his poltroon officers sold their regiment, when they might have maintained their position and retrieved the day. The men were well armed, well disciplined, and were eager to fight; but their Colonel faltered, and dared not lead them on to victory. The loss of our regiment was fifteen killed and seventy-five wounded. The whole number engaged was one hundred and fifty at the camp, and seventy-five provost-guards. The Minnesota Third had six hundred effective men, a battery of four guns to support them, and lost one killed and seven wounded. The sick and wounded officers were all paroled on the spot, the rest were marched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital and evade the parole. I shall soon join my company, wh
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
nth Michigan volunteers. The force then at Murfreesboro was as follows: Five companies Ninth Michigan volunteers, Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, two hundred strong, together with the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry, eighty-one strong, were camped three fourths of a mile east of the town upon the Liberty Turnpike. One company, B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Rounds, forty-two strong, occupied the Court.-House; the other four companies, Ninth Michigan volunteers, having been ordered to Tullahoma a month since, while nine companies of the Third Minnesota volunteers, Colonel Lester, (one company being on detached duty as train-guard,) four hundred and fifty strong, and Hewitt's battery, First regiment artillery, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro,Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-thh Michigan volunteers. The force then at Murfreesboro was as follows: Five companies Ninth Michig total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Cad their labors proved that they had filled Murfreesboro jail with rebel prisoners. Many of these p on the Woodbury pike, about six miles from Murfreesboro. This important information was received l the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro. Being halted here for a few minutes the aor home, happiness and liberty, then should Murfreesboro be inscribed in golden letters upon their b
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
f more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. s. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring the country, and so effectual requesting him to use every possible exertion to hold his position, and if he should fail to do so to fight his way to Nashville. The enemy then divided forces, sending one part to succor those engaged with the Minnesota Third, while the other busarched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital a
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