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well claim a victory, and such it certainly was. I inclose a list of the casualties in the Third and Fourth Corps in the battles of the thirty-first ult. and first inst. Respectfully submitted, S. P. Heintzelman, Brigadier-General Commanding. List of casualties in Third and Fourth corps at the battle of seven Pines and Faut I determined to attack at daylight on the second of September, in front of Chantilly. The movement of the enemy had become so developed by the afternoon of the first, and was so evidently directed to Fairfax Court-House, with a view of turning my right, that I made the necessary disposition of troops to fight a battle between twith the wagon trains of the army, to pursue the old Braddock road and come into the Alexandria turnpike in rear of Fairfax Court-House. Just before sunset on the first, the enemy attacked us on our right, but was met by Hooker, McDowell, Reno, and Kearny's division, of Heintzelman's corps. A very severe action occurred in the mi
even, after enormous marches. On Wednesday, the third instant, we marched to Dranesville; on Thursday to Leesb You fought them into the position we desired on the third, punishing them terribly; and on the fourth, in threemy. About five o'clock of the morning of the third instant, the brigade formed; two regiments, the Eleventhade occurred principally in the engagement on the third inst., the Fifteenth suffering most. The killed, wouent which took place at Corinth, Mississippi, on the third and fourth instant: The Second Iowa infantry regiment went into the battle on the morning of the third instant, commanded by Colonel James Baker, with three fief the Mississippi: sir: On the morning of the third instant, at this camp, I received orders to be in readinTuscumbia River about three o'clock A. M. on the third instant, and marched to Corinth during the morning, abouhe West for another great victory won by them on the third, fourth, and fifth inst., over the combined armies o
ear Cooper: I wrote you a short communication from IuKa, announcing its peaceable capture on the fourth, by the army under General Price. I believe I was a little congratulatory in my remarks, and sp You fought them into the position we desired on the third, punishing them terribly; and on the fourth, in three hours after the infantry entered into action they were completely beaten. You killed vision, whose magnificent fighting on the third more than atones for all that was lacking on the fourth. To all the officers and soldiers of this army, who bravely fought, I offer my heartfelt thanksard. Thus we remained during the night and until the battle had commenced on the morning of the fourth, when the five companies of the Eleventh Iowa, also the five companies of the Thirteenth Iowa, wfantry regiment in the engagement which took place at Corinth, Mississippi, on the third and fourth instant: The Second Iowa infantry regiment went into the battle on the morning of the third insta
battery, under command of Lieut. Marsh, a very brave and competent officer. At daylight, on the fifth, the brigade started in pursuit of the retreating enemy; and continued the pursuit until the eveverely; enlisted men, forty-four; missing enlisted men, one; taken at Camp Montgomery on the fifth instant, one; total killed, wounded, and missing in both days' engagements: Killed of commanding offselves for gallantry and soldierly bearing during the battle. Early on the morning of the fifth instant, I joined with my command in the pursuit of Van Dorn's and Price's armies; marched sixteen m Capt. F. W. Fox, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: At eight o'clock on the morning of the fifth instant, under orders from Brig.-Gen. Veatch, the Forty-sixth regiment took position on the right ofulates the armies of the West for another great victory won by them on the third, fourth, and fifth inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. The enemy chose his own time and
s, and caring for the wounded. His labors have only been limited by the powers of his physical endurance. If space permitted, I should be glad to mention, by name, the dead and living non-commissioned officers and privates who distinguished themselves for gallantry and soldierly bearing during the battle. Early on the morning of the fifth instant, I joined with my command in the pursuit of Van Dorn's and Price's armies; marched sixteen miles, and bivouacked near Widow Wright's. On the sixth, continued the pursuit, marching sixteen miles; bivouacked at Crumm's Mills. The road was strewn with arms, ammunition, camp equipage, wagons, etc., showing that the armies of the enemy were perfectly stampeded. On the seventh, again in pursuit before day-light, marching through Jonesborough, and, late at night, reached a point near Ripley. I have the honor to enclose, herewith, a list of the killed, wounded, and missing. Deing ordered in pursuit so soon after battle, prevents me fro
ut half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and inspected the corps of Major-Gen. Sigel. I remained at Sperryville until four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, during which report. headquarters Second brigade, Second division, Ninth army corps, Antietam, September 19, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that on Sunday, seventh instant, according to your orders, my brigade marched from Washington; that our march was resumed daily without noticeable incident, until Sunday, fourteenth instt Crumm's Mills. The road was strewn with arms, ammunition, camp equipage, wagons, etc., showing that the armies of the enemy were perfectly stampeded. On the seventh, again in pursuit before day-light, marching through Jonesborough, and, late at night, reached a point near Ripley. I have the honor to enclose, herewith, a li
Culpeper, Va., August ninth, 1862. We left Culpeper Saturday morning, the eighth inst., and marched a distance of about eight miles, and arrived at the scene of acive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required calso reached there from Waterloo Bridge. During the whole of the morning of the eighth, I continued to receive reports from Gen. Bayard, who was slowly falling back i Sperryville to the same place. To my surprise, I received, after night on the eighth, a note from Gen. Sigel, dated at Sperryville, at half-past 6 o'clock that afteain body, I had telegraphed Gen. King at Fredericksburgh to move forward on the eighth, by the lower fords of the Rappahannock and Stevensburgh, to join me. A large pof the retreating enemy; and continued the pursuit until the evening of the eighth instant, when, after resting one day, orders were received to return to Corinth wit
der General Jackson. At nine A. M. on the morning of the ninth, after a hurried march of the day before, which was prolongm camp near Culpeper Court-House, on the morning of the ninth instant. After a fatiguing march in the intense heat, from the Va., August 10. dear times: At ten o'clock A. M. of the ninth orders were received in camp at Culpeper for all the forcesd in our battalion came safely off the battle-ground on the ninth, and the only officers uninjured were Major Lane and Captaiugust 12--6 1/2 P. M. Colonel: On the evening of the ninth instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle Desultory artillery firing had been kept up all day on the ninth, in the direction of Gen. Banks's corps, but I continued toreport to General Banks in the early part of the day of the ninth, and to advise freely with him as to the operations of his The artillery firing was kept up until near midnight of the ninth. Finding that Banks's corps had been severely cut up, and
to Culpeper Court-House, and proceed as rapidly as possible to put the corps in condition for service. In consequence of the vigorous resistance of the night previous, and the severe loss of the enemy in trying to advance, before daylight of the tenth, Jackson drew back his forces toward Cedar Mountain, about two miles from our front. Our pickets were immediately pushed forward, supported by Milroy's brigade, and occupied the ground. The day of the eighteenth was intensely hot, and the trothe pursuit until the evening of the eighth instant, when, after resting one day, orders were received to return to Corinth with two regiments, and to leave two regiments to come back with Brig.-Gen. McPherson. At daylight, on the morning of the tenth, I started to Corinth with the Thirteenth and Sixteenth, leaving the Eleventh and Fifteenth under the command of Lieut.-Col. Hall of the Eleventh to return with Gen. McPherson. We marched back to Corinth in less than two days, without any unus
giving King's division one night's rest, to fall upon him at daylight on the twelfth on his line of communications, and compel him to fight a battle, which must have been entirely decisive for one army or the other. But during the night of the eleventh, Jackson evacuated the positions in front of us, and retreated rapidly across the Rapidan, in the direction of Gordonsville, leaving many of his dead and wounded on the field and along the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House. No mate bringing off about one hundred. The cavalry had, in the mean time, approached to within three hundred yards of the enemy's lines without drawing their fire, and having ascertained their position, withdrew to our lines. On the morning of the eleventh, it being determined to take our dead and wounded off the field, I was ordered to advance my brigade to cover our ambulances and working parties. I accordingly sent forward my three companies of cavalry, followed by my infantry. The cavalry, u
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