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Bacon Creek, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
nty-eighth Indiana, attached to the Fiftieth for duty — in all four hundred and forty-six strong, rank and file — for Green River, near Munfordville, to reenforce Col. Wilder in defence of that point. The train ran very slowly until some distance below Elizabethtown, when I went forward and earnestly urged the engineer to greater speed, assuring him that it was all-important for us to reach Green River before daylight. He did increase the speed as far as safety would permit. Just below Bacon Creek, and about seven miles from Green River, the train stopped for wood. I immediately passed along the cars, aroused the men, and bid them stand by their arms in readiness for any emergency, as we were approaching dangerous ground. I then took position on the engine, and the train moved cautiously forward. We had proceeded about a mile when we ran upon a portion of the track which had been undermined by the enemy, and slid to one side in such a manner as to make the injury apparent to the
Elizabethtown, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
o an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad with six companies of the Fiftieth regiment Indiana volunteers, and one company (K) of the Seventy-eighth Indiana, attached to the Fiftieth for duty — in all four hundred and forty-six strong, rank and file — for Green River, near Munfordville, to reenforce Col. Wilder in defence of that point. The train ran very slowly until some distance below Elizabethtown, when I went forward and earnestly urged the engineer to greater speed, assuring him that it was all-important for us to reach Green River before daylight. He did increase the speed as far as safety would permit. Just below Bacon Creek, and about seven miles from Green River, the train stopped for wood. I immediately passed along the cars, aroused the men, and bid them stand by their arms in readiness for any emergency, as we were approaching dangerous ground. I then took position on
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
burgh, on the Mississippi River, in the State of Mississippi, and there exchanged, or paroled until it to waver. At this moment Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, who had command of Gen. Jackson's divisionounded in the engagement: Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, commanding Jackson's division, killed. te victory (?). So, for the present, Northern Mississippi is safe from its liberators, and Buell eprobation. Doc. 127.-battle of Corinth, Miss. General Grant's despatches. Grant's heith all the available rebel forces in North-Mississippi for the purpose of capturing Corinth, or bre army which the rebels could muster in Northern Mississippi, Van Dorn commanding, (Price's army, Va are: We fought the combined rebel force of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, VillThe entire available force of the rebels in Mississippi, save a few garrisons and a small reserve, . Evidently he relied chiefly on Texas and Mississippi, for the troops of those States were in fro[1 more...]
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ard the Little River turnpike, to ascertain if the enemy were making any movements in the direction of Germantown or Fairfax Court-House. The enemy was found moving again slowly toward our right, heavy columns of his force being in march toward Fairfax along Little River pike. The main body of our forces was so much broken down, and so completely exhausted, that they were in no condition, even on the first of September, for any active operations against the enemy; but I determined to attack ars to notify Gen. McClellan of their approach to the points which they are to occupy. By order of Major-Gen. Pope. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, Fairfax, Sept. 2, 1862. Major-General Halleck: The whole army is returning in good order, without confusion or the slightest loss of property. The enemy has made no advances this morning, owing no doubt to his severe loss last evening. Three army c
Tuscumbia Creek (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
he enemy had evidently sacrificed the large body of men composing their pickets — principally Tennesseeans, and the first notice many of them had of the flight of the rebel army was our approach. Bodies of men were placed at each bridge with the means of burning it, and the road itself, although very much cut and broken, was either recently built, or recently repaired, and was so arranged as to assist a retreat and obstruct a pursuit. It has a general south-west direction, and crosses Tuscumbia Creek four times in less than two miles. We crossed three well-built bridges and were driven away from the fourth, which is, I believe, nearly five miles from Corinth. The ground is very wet, and almost if not entirely impassable on both sides of the last two miles of the road. I have the honor to be, with very great respect, J. H. Hammond, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff, Fifth Division. Doc. 96.-occupation of Williamsburgh, Va. General McClellan's despatches.
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
as on the twenty-ninth; on that day there was a sharp skirmish. Major Kelley, New-York volunteers, killed, and two privates wounded. On the thirtieth, our pickets ast of killed, wounded, and missing company B, one hundred and Second regiment, New-York volunteers. killed — John Eighmy, Peter Rock, John Simon, and David Smith. 104.-Gen. Pope's campaign in Virginia. General Pope's official report. New-York, January 27, 1863. General: I have the honor to submit the following reportjor-General Commanding. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. New-York, Jan. 27, 1863. A despatch was received from Major-General Banks on the secgenerally. They comprised the following: Twelfth N. Y. State Militia, from New-York,600 Thirty-ninth New-York,530 One Hundred and Eleventh New-York--raw troops,the battle — only time to state its broadest features, then mount and spur for New-York. After the brilliant victory near Middletown, Gen. McClellan pushed forward
Wyoming (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
eneral order no. 84. War Department, Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, Richmond, May 3, 1862. 1. The following proclamation is published for the information of all concerned. proclamation. By virtue of the power vested in me by law to declare the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do proclaim that martial law is hereby extended over the counties of Lee, Wise, Buchanan, McDowell and Wyoming, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall; and I do proclaim the suspension of all civil jurisdiction, (with the exception of that enabling the courts to take cognizance of the probate of wills, the administration of the estates of deceased persons, the qualification of guardians, to enter decrees and orders for the partition and sale of property, to make orders concerning roads and bridges, to assess county levies, and to order the payment of county dues,) and the suspension of th
Jeffersonville, Ind. (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ery thing to advance your plans of campaign. I understood that this army was to maintain the line of the Rappahannock until all the forces from the Peninsula had united behind that river. I have done so. I understood distinctly that I was not to hazard any thing except for this purpose, as delay was what was wanted. The enemy this morning has pushed a considerable infantry force up opposite Waterloo Bridge, and is planting batteries, and long lines of his infantry are moving up from Jeffersonville toward Sulphur Springs. His whole force, as far as can be ascertained, is massed in front of me from railroad crossing of Rappahannock around to Waterloo Bridge, their main body being opposite Sulphur Springs. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. [Extract.] United States Military Telegraph--Received August 26, 1862. From War Department 11.45 A. M. To Major-Gen. Pope: Not the slightest dissatisfaction has been felt in regar
Great River (United States) (search for this): chapter 97
Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, Warrenton, August 24, 1862--3.45 P. M. Major-Gen. Halleck, General-in-Chief, Washington: I arrived in Warrenton last night; the enemy had left two hours previously. Milroy's brigade, the advance of Sigel's corps, came upon the enemy late yesterday afternoon, near Great Run, about four miles from Warrenton Sulphur Springs, and near the mouth of it. A sharp action took place, which lasted till after dark, the enemy being driven across Great River, but destroying the bridge behind them. Early this morning General Buford reached Waterloo Bridge, which was defended by a considerable force of the enemy and one piece of artillery. He took possession of the bridge and destroyed it. Sigel's force advanced again on the left this morning, and when last heard from was pursuing the enemy in the direction of Waterloo Bridge. His column was being. shelled from the opposite bank of the river, which is still too deep to be forded. The en
Three Bridges (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
nd the sheltering hills concealed the rebel masses. What from our front looked like only a narrow summit fringed with woods was a broad tableland of forest and ravine; cover for troops every where, nowhere easy access for an enemy. The smoothly sloping surface in front and the sweeping crescent of slowly mingling lines was all a delusion. It was all a rebel stronghold beyond. Under the base of these hills runs the deep stream called Antietam Creek, fordable only at distant points. Three bridges cross it, one on the Hagerstown road, one on the Sharpsburgh pike, one to the left in a deep recess of steeply falling hills. Hooker passed the first to reach the ford by which he crossed, and it was held by Pleasanton with a reserve of cavalry during the battle. The second was close under the rebel centre, and no way important to yesterday's fight. At the third, Burnside attacked and finally crossed. Between the first and third lay most of the battle-lines. They stretched four mile
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