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Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
and his wounded on the ground and along the road to Orange Court-House, as will be seen from Gen. Buford's despatch. A cav-General Banks to instantly advance on the road leading to Orange, Gen. Williams's division being already in advance. This addle, and off for the field of battle. Upon reaching the Orange road, I found the corps of Gen. Banks in motion. Gen. Wiloving backward and forward over a hill to the right of the Orange road. Why only four batteries were left to fight against alry, was posted near Rapidan station, the point where the Orange and Alexandria road crosses Rapidan River, with his picket, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and i the field and along the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House. No material of war nor baggage-trains were lost onrtson's River, where the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House crosses that stream; my centre, under Gen. McDowell,
Kossuth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ccompanying map. Hamilton on the right, Davidson the centre, McKean on the left, with an advance of three regiments of infantry and a section of artillery under Colonel Oliver on the Chewalla road, at or near Alexander's, beyond the rebel breastworks. The cavalry were disposed as follows: (See map accompanying Colonel Wiezner's report.) A battalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Kansas and a part of the Seventh Illinois at Kossuth and Boneyard, watching the rebels' right flank; Colonel Hatch and Captain Wilcox on the east and north fronts, covering and reconnoitring. The reasons for these dispositions flow obviously from the foregoing explanations of our ignorance of the north-westerly approach, and of the possibility that the rebels might threaten us on the Chewalla and attack us by the Smith's Bridge road on our left, or go round and try us with his main force on the Purdy, or even Pittsburgh Landing road. Th
Cypress Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ersa. Rumors that the attack was to take the direction of Jackson or Bolivar, via Bethel, were so rife, and the fortifications of Corinth were so well known to the rebels, that I had hopes they would undertake to mask me, and, passing north, give me an opportunity to beat the masking force, and cut off their retreat. This hope gained some strength from the supposed difficulties of the country lying in the triangle formed by the Memphis and Charleston, the Mobile and Ohio railroads and Cypress Creek. To be prepared for eventualities, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions were placed just beyond Bridge Creek, the infantry outposts were called in from Iuka, Burnsville, Rienzi and Danville, and the outpost at Chewalla retired to New-Alexander, and strengthened by another regiment and a battery, early on the morning of the second. During that day evidences increased showing the practicability of the country north-west of us, and disclosed the facts, not before known, that there were
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
lliam Nelson, Commanding Army of Kentucky: sir: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the part taken by the troops under my command in the battles fought near Richmond, Ky., on the twenty-ninth and thirtieth days of August, 1862. On Friday, the twenty-ninth of August, a courier arrived at my headquarters, some two miles south of Richmond, at eleven A. M., bearing a communication from Lieut.-Colonel Munday, commanding a small detachment of cavalry in the neighborhood of Kingston, five or six miles south of me. Col. Munday informed me, in this communication, that he believed the enemy were advancing in considerable force. I caused two copies of Col. Munday's letter to me to be made out, one of which I sent to Lancaster and the other to Lexington, directed to you, not having been informed at which place you might be found. I also sent a written message to Colonel Munday, directing him to hold the enemy in check, and ascertain if possible his strength and position;
Sweet Air, Baltimore County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
urday till dark; from half-past 2 P. M. Sunday, the fourteenth, till dark; and at last, before daylight on Monday, September fifteenth, until the last shell and round shot was expended, at nine o'clock A. M. Col. Miles's limb was not amputated; reaction did not take place sufficient to allow of it. He lingered until half-past 4 P. M. on Tuesday. On Wednesday his body was taken to Frederick in a rough box by his staff-officers, and a metallic case procured, and therein conveyed to Sweet Air, Baltimore County, near Baltimore, Md. I hope justice will be done by the proper report at headquarters of the army. Justice demands that the public await the official report, which will be given the world in a few days. I am, sir, with great respect, Henry M. Binney, Captain and Aid-de-Camp to Colonel D. S. Miles, Commanding Division. New-York times narrative. Another serious reverse has overtaken the National arms. Harper's Ferry, the Union strong-hold on the Upper Potomac, has b
Gatesville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
rnation in several quarters among the families of the captured rebels, but the decided firmness and delicacy of the commanding officer overcame all objections, and the prisoners were soon on their way to Suffolk. The celerity of Colonel Dodge's movements contributed to his success, for he was surrounded by enemies, and it became apparent that, by some well-devised code of signals among the rebels, his appearance was anticipated in some instances, and at Hertford, Sunsbury, Mintonville and Gatesville he was assured that he would never reach Suffolk. But his dash and dare, promptness of decision and good judgment, brought him safely through one of the most brilliant expeditions of the campaign. By means of this dashing reconnoissance the Government has become acquainted with important information in regard to the situation of the rebels in that portion of North-Carolina. The nature of the roads in various directions has been ascertained, and the position and intentions of certain reb
Bull Run Mountains (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
aching there after midnight. Up again by day-dawn, and still on, along the Manassas Gap road, meeting crowds — all welcoming, cheering, staring with blank amazement. So all day Tuesday, through White Plains, Haymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Gainesville, to Bristow station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad--making the difference from Amosville to Bristow (between forty-five and fifty miles) within the forty-eight hours. We burned up at Bristow two or three railway-trains, a ridge running from Sudley Church Ford to the Warrenton turnpike. We drove them off, and on Friday morning we held the ridge, in front of which runs an incomplete railroad — cut and embankment. Now, we had made a circuit from the Gap in Bull Run Mountains around to the Junction and Centreville, breaking up the railroad and destroying their stores, and returned to within six miles of the Gap, through which Longstreet must come. The enemy disputed his passage and delayed him till late in the
Boneyard (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
map. Hamilton on the right, Davidson the centre, McKean on the left, with an advance of three regiments of infantry and a section of artillery under Colonel Oliver on the Chewalla road, at or near Alexander's, beyond the rebel breastworks. The cavalry were disposed as follows: (See map accompanying Colonel Wiezner's report.) A battalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Kansas and a part of the Seventh Illinois at Kossuth and Boneyard, watching the rebels' right flank; Colonel Hatch and Captain Wilcox on the east and north fronts, covering and reconnoitring. The reasons for these dispositions flow obviously from the foregoing explanations of our ignorance of the north-westerly approach, and of the possibility that the rebels might threaten us on the Chewalla and attack us by the Smith's Bridge road on our left, or go round and try us with his main force on the Purdy, or even Pittsburgh Landing road. The general pla
Bolton's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
he honor to be, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant, M. M. Trumbull, Lieut.-Col. Commanding Third Iowa Infantry. Report of Lieut.-Colonel Jones. headquarters Forty-Sixth regiment Illinois volunteers, in the field, October 9, 1862. Capt. F. W. Fox, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: At eight o'clock on the morning of the fifth instant, under orders from Brig.-Gen. Veatch, the Forty-sixth regiment took position on the right of the Second brigade in the advance, to support Bolton's battery, two miles west of the Big Hatchie. After several shots, the battery took position half a mile in advance, when they opened a galling fire on the rebels, which lasted about three fourths of an hour; when the command Fire was given, the men all moved at the word, and soon received the melancholy intelligence that our loved and gallant Colonel Davis was again severely wounded by a canister shot. When I took command and announced this, they all seemed determined to avenge their loss
Pleasant Valley (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ceived on September first, from our pickets at that point who were driven in to Point of Rocks. Reinforcements were immediately received at that point. Col. Miles sent the Eighty-seventh Ohio regiment, with two twelve-pounder howitzers. The enemy crossed in very large force, cutting the canal at Seven-Mile Level, driving back our forces to Berlin, thence to Knoxville, Weaverton, and finally to Sandy Hook. Thursday, September eleventh, the enemy were nearly fifty thousand strong in Pleasant Valley, and forced their way through Solomon's Gap, and there shelled out our picket, who were thrown there by Col. Ford, of the Thirty-second Ohio, who commanded Maryland Heights. He then had the Thirty-second Ohio, six hundred; Rhode Island cavalry, three hundred and fifty; Maryland cavalry, two hundred; McGrath's artillery company, one hundred; battalion First Maryland infantry, three hundred; total, one thousand five hundred and fifty. Col. Ford represented if he had another regiment, he
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