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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Heroism of the Third Iowa regiment at the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. Major Jones, the correspondent of the West-Union Pioneer, writes to that paper a graphic account of that portion of the great fight at Pittsburgh Landing in which he participated. He says the Third formed in line at the Landing without orders, in just fifteen minutes from the firing of the first gun, and soon were off on the double-quick for the fight. Coming up within sixty rods of the enemy, they opened fire, but the distance was too great for execution, and the enemy being in heavy force, they fell back to a less exposed position, behind a rail-fence, where they awaited the coming of the rebels. The force opposed to them was the Pensacola brigade, the flower of Beauregard's army. As was expected, this large body charged upon the Third, and of this charge we will let the Major's graphic pen relate: But we were beginning to get sleepy and wishing for a change of programme, when we discovered the e
Heroism of the Third Iowa regiment at the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. Major Jones, the correspondent of the West-Union Pioneer, writes to that paper a graphic account of that portion of the great fight at Pittsburgh Landing in which he participated. He says the Third formed in line at the Landing without orders, in just fifteen minutes from the firing of the first gun, and soon were off on the double-quick for the fight. Coming up within sixty rods of the enemy, they opened fire, but the distance was too great for execution, and the enemy being in heavy force, they fell back to a less exposed position, behind a rail-fence, where they awaited the coming of the rebels. The force opposed to them was the Pensacola brigade, the flower of Beauregard's army. As was expected, this large body charged upon the Third, and of this charge we will let the Major's graphic pen relate: But we were beginning to get sleepy and wishing for a change of programme, when we discovered the
P. G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 30
He says the Third formed in line at the Landing without orders, in just fifteen minutes from the firing of the first gun, and soon were off on the double-quick for the fight. Coming up within sixty rods of the enemy, they opened fire, but the distance was too great for execution, and the enemy being in heavy force, they fell back to a less exposed position, behind a rail-fence, where they awaited the coming of the rebels. The force opposed to them was the Pensacola brigade, the flower of Beauregard's army. As was expected, this large body charged upon the Third, and of this charge we will let the Major's graphic pen relate: But we were beginning to get sleepy and wishing for a change of programme, when we discovered the enemy were preparing to make the charge. On they came, a fine set of fellows, with beautiful banners and a line that nothing but what was in waiting for them could break. On they came, steady and firm, their polished arms reflecting the bright sun and making