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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
Rebel prisoners in Ohio.--The following account of the treatment of rebel prisoners in the Ohio Penitentiary was given in the Richmond Examiner of March seventeenth, 1864: The experiences of this war have afforded many examples of Yankee cruelty which have produced an impression more or less distinct upon the enlightened portions of the world. But the statement which we proceed to give, takes precedence of all that has ever yet been narrated of the atrocities of the enemy; and it is so r Morgan, who arrived in Richmond under the recent flag of truce, which covered the return of several hundred of our prisoners. Captain Morgan was among those of his brother's expedition who, i;n last July, were incarcerated in the Penitentiary of Ohio. On entering this infamous abode, Captain t Morgan and his companions were strapped in a reception-room and their naked bodies: examined there. They were again stripped in the interior of the prison, and washed in tubs bynegro convicts; their ha
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
s Captain Morgan, as well as my brother. When he came out of his dungeon, I swear to you I did not know him. His face had swollen to two or three times its ordinary size, and he tottered so that I had to catch him from falling. Captain Barton was in an awful state. His face was swollen, and the blood was bursting from the skin. All of them had to be watched, so as to check them in eating, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer to Johnson's Island, whence, after being carried to Point Lookout, he was exchanged. He says that when he (got into Beast Butler's hands, he felt as if he had been translated to Paradise --showing what comparative things misery and happiness are in this world. But he left in those black walls of captivity he had been released from, sixty-five brave men, who are wearing their lives away without even a small whisper of relief from that government for which they are martyrs. Is there any authority in Ric
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
ixty-five brave men, who are wearing their lives away without even a small whisper of relief from that government for which they are martyrs. Is there any authority in Richmond that will crook a thumb to save these men, who are not only flesh of our flesh, but the defenders of those in this capital, who, not exactly disowning them, undertake the base and cowardly pretence of ignoring their fate? What is the confederate definition of retaliation ? Captain Morgan says that on his way down the bay, to Fortress Monroe, he met Colonel Streight; that this famous hostage ? was fat and rubicund; that he spoke freely of his prison experience in Richmond, and complained only that he had to eat corn-bread. This appeared to be the extent of his sufferings, and the confederate limit of retaliation. Is it necessary to pre-sent the contrast further than we have already done, by a relation of facts at once more truthful and more terrible than any argument or declamation could pos-sibly be?
Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
e came out of his dungeon, I swear to you I did not know him. His face had swollen to two or three times its ordinary size, and he tottered so that I had to catch him from falling. Captain Barton was in an awful state. His face was swollen, and the blood was bursting from the skin. All of them had to be watched, so as to check them in eating, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer to Johnson's Island, whence, after being carried to Point Lookout, he was exchanged. He says that when he (got into Beast Butler's hands, he felt as if he had been translated to Paradise --showing what comparative things misery and happiness are in this world. But he left in those black walls of captivity he had been released from, sixty-five brave men, who are wearing their lives away without even a small whisper of relief from that government for which they are martyrs. Is there any authority in Richmond that will crook a thumb to save these men
their companions. With their bodies swollen and discolored, with their minds bordering on childishness, tottering, some of them talking foolishly, these wretched men seemed to agree but in one thing — a ravenous desire for food. I had known Captain Coles, says Captain Morgan, as well as my brother. When he came out of his dungeon, I swear to you I did not know him. His face had swollen to two or three times its ordinary size, and he tottered so that I had to catch him from falling. Captain Barton was in an awful state. His face was swollen, and the blood was bursting from the skin. All of them had to be watched, so as to check them in eating, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer to Johnson's Island, whence, after being carried to Point Lookout, he was exchanged. He says that when he (got into Beast Butler's hands, he felt as if he had been translated to Paradise --showing what comparative things misery and happiness are i
Captain Morgan endured this confinement for eighteen hours, and was taken out barely alive. The other prisoners endured it for sixteen days and nights. In this time they were visited at different periods by the physician of the penitentiary--Dr. Loring--who felt their pulses and examined their conditions, to ascertain how long life might hold out under the exacting torture. It was awful, this ceremony of torture, this medical examination of the victims. The tramp of the prisoners' feet up and down, (there was no room to walk,) as they thus worked for life, was incessantly going on. This black tread-mill of the dungeon could be heard all through the cold and dreary hours of the night. Dr. Loring, who was comparatively a humane person, besought Merion to release the unhappy men; said they had already been taxed to the point of death. The wretch replied: They did not talk right yet. He wished them to humble themselves to him. He went into the cell of one of them, Major Webber, to
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 154
ace had swollen to two or three times its ordinary size, and he tottered so that I had to catch him from falling. Captain Barton was in an awful state. His face was swollen, and the blood was bursting from the skin. All of them had to be watched, so as to check them in eating, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer to Johnson's Island, whence, after being carried to Point Lookout, he was exchanged. He says that when he (got into Beast Butler's hands, he felt as if he had been translated to Paradise --showing what comparative things misery and happiness are in this world. But he left in those black walls of captivity he had been released from, sixty-five brave men, who are wearing their lives away without even a small whisper of relief from that government for which they are martyrs. Is there any authority in Richmond that will crook a thumb to save these men, who are not only flesh of our flesh, but the defenders of those in
sixty-five brave men, who are wearing their lives away without even a small whisper of relief from that government for which they are martyrs. Is there any authority in Richmond that will crook a thumb to save these men, who are not only flesh of our flesh, but the defenders of those in this capital, who, not exactly disowning them, undertake the base and cowardly pretence of ignoring their fate? What is the confederate definition of retaliation ? Captain Morgan says that on his way down the bay, to Fortress Monroe, he met Colonel Streight; that this famous hostage ? was fat and rubicund; that he spoke freely of his prison experience in Richmond, and complained only that he had to eat corn-bread. This appeared to be the extent of his sufferings, and the confederate limit of retaliation. Is it necessary to pre-sent the contrast further than we have already done, by a relation of facts at once more truthful and more terrible than any argument or declamation could pos-sibly be?
Calvin C. Morgan (search for this): chapter 154
t we have just taken from the lips of Captain Calvin C. Morgan, a brother of the famous General MorgGeneral Morgan, who arrived in Richmond under the recent flag of truce, which covered the return of several hundred of our prisoners. Captain Morgan was among those of his brother's expedition who, i;n last July of the infernal. It appears that after General Morgan's escape, suspicion alighted on the wardeneven of them, all officers, and among them Captain Morgan, were taken to the west end of the buildinad been suffering from heart-disease, says Captain Morgan. It was terribly aggravated by the cold an. I felt I was struggling for my life. Captain Morgan endured this confinement for eighteen hourr food. I had known Captain Coles, says Captain Morgan, as well as my brother. When he came out ting, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer the confederate definition of retaliation ? Captain Morgan says that on his way down the bay, to Fort[1 more...]
ixteen days the men were released from the dungeons. Merion said he would take them out this time alive, but the next time they offended they would be taken out feet foremost. Their appearance was frightful; they could no longer be recognized by their companions. With their bodies swollen and discolored, with their minds bordering on childishness, tottering, some of them talking foolishly, these wretched men seemed to agree but in one thing — a ravenous desire for food. I had known Captain Coles, says Captain Morgan, as well as my brother. When he came out of his dungeon, I swear to you I did not know him. His face had swollen to two or three times its ordinary size, and he tottered so that I had to catch him from falling. Captain Barton was in an awful state. His face was swollen, and the blood was bursting from the skin. All of them had to be watched, so as to check them in eating, as they had been starved so long. Captain Morgan was so fortunate as to obtain a transfer
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