hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 52 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 52 0 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 42 0 Browse Search
John Bull 36 0 Browse Search
Grant 32 8 Browse Search
Ohio (Ohio, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 26 2 Browse Search
John Brown 22 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Calvin C. Morgan 21 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 10 total hits in 5 results.

United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Southern Greek fire;--The Mobile Register and Advertiser asserts that Colonel John Travis (of pistol-shot notoriety) has discovered, if not the ancient, at least its counterpart and equal, the modern Greek fire. Its components are kept secret, but Colonel Travis tenders the use of his invention to the confederate States. The Register gives the following account of a test of this fire: On Thursday evening last, near the bay road, in the suburbs of this city, in the presence of several scientific professors, ordnance and artillery officers, Colonel Miller, commanding this volunteer and conscript bureau, other officers of the army and navy, a score of ladies, and at least one representative of the press, Captain Travis made two distinct experiments of his fire or composition; using on each occasion less than half a pint of the preparation, a fluid. Both were eminently successful, eliciting universal commendation. Instantaneously on being exposed to the air the fluid becomes
J. W. Miller (search for this): chapter 20
erts that Colonel John Travis (of pistol-shot notoriety) has discovered, if not the ancient, at least its counterpart and equal, the modern Greek fire. Its components are kept secret, but Colonel Travis tenders the use of his invention to the confederate States. The Register gives the following account of a test of this fire: On Thursday evening last, near the bay road, in the suburbs of this city, in the presence of several scientific professors, ordnance and artillery officers, Colonel Miller, commanding this volunteer and conscript bureau, other officers of the army and navy, a score of ladies, and at least one representative of the press, Captain Travis made two distinct experiments of his fire or composition; using on each occasion less than half a pint of the preparation, a fluid. Both were eminently successful, eliciting universal commendation. Instantaneously on being exposed to the air the fluid becomes a blaze of fire, with heat intense, resembling that of a liquid
Advertiser (search for this): chapter 20
Southern Greek fire;--The Mobile Register and Advertiser asserts that Colonel John Travis (of pistol-shot notoriety) has discovered, if not the ancient, at least its counterpart and equal, the modern Greek fire. Its components are kept secret, but Colonel Travis tenders the use of his invention to the confederate States. The Register gives the following account of a test of this fire: On Thursday evening last, near the bay road, in the suburbs of this city, in the presence of several scientific professors, ordnance and artillery officers, Colonel Miller, commanding this volunteer and conscript bureau, other officers of the army and navy, a score of ladies, and at least one representative of the press, Captain Travis made two distinct experiments of his fire or composition; using on each occasion less than half a pint of the preparation, a fluid. Both were eminently successful, eliciting universal commendation. Instantaneously on being exposed to the air the fluid becomes
John Travis (search for this): chapter 20
Southern Greek fire;--The Mobile Register and Advertiser asserts that Colonel John Travis (of pistol-shot notoriety) has discovered, if not the ancient, at least its counterpart and equal, the modern Greek fire. Its components are kept secret, but Colonel Travis tenders the use of his invention to the confederate States. The Register gives the following account of a test of this fire: On Thursday evening last, near the bay road, in the suburbs of this city, in the presence of severanscript bureau, other officers of the army and navy, a score of ladies, and at least one representative of the press, Captain Travis made two distinct experiments of his fire or composition; using on each occasion less than half a pint of the preparand the wood cracked and hummed, and the flames arose again defiantly unquenchable. On the occasion of these experiments, Travis's Greek Fire burned for something over a quarter of an hour in full vigor and force. Its heat is intense, and flies at o
October 22nd (search for this): chapter 20
h occasion less than half a pint of the preparation, a fluid. Both were eminently successful, eliciting universal commendation. Instantaneously on being exposed to the air the fluid becomes a blaze of fire, with heat intense, resembling that of a liquid metal in the smelting process. A pile of green wood, into which it was thrown, ignited immediately, like tinder. Without delay, within ten seconds, a number of bucketfuls of water were thrown upon the flames, a dense volume of smoke ascended, the hissing and singing sound of a quenched fire was heard; but lo! the burning fluid licked up the water, destroying its oxygen, a fluid seemingly added to the flame, and the wood cracked and hummed, and the flames arose again defiantly unquenchable. On the occasion of these experiments, Travis's Greek Fire burned for something over a quarter of an hour in full vigor and force. Its heat is intense, and flies at once into the body of the substance it touches.--Atlanta Appeal, October 22.