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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Cumberland City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glass
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
10. the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle
Missionary Ridge (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ove the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glasses in a hurried rush to arms. Then together up the highlands, surely, swiftly, swept the lines, And the clang of war above them sw
Orchard Knob (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
rom the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glasses in a hurried rush to arms. Then together up the highlands, surely, swiftly, swept the lines, And the clang of war above them swelled with loud and louder signs, Till the loyal peaks of Lookout in the tempest seemed to throb, And the star-flag of our country waved in smoke on Orchard Knob. Day, and night, and day returning, ceaseless shock and ceaseless change, Still the furious mountain conflict burst and burned along the range, While with battle's cloud of sulphur mingled densely mist and rain, Till the ascending squadrons vanished from the gazers on the plain. From the boats upon the river, from the tents upon the shore, From the roofs of yonder city anxious eyes the clouds explore: But no rift amid the darkness shows them father, brother, sons, While they trace the vi
from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glasses in a hurried rush to arms. Then together up the highlands, surely, swiftly, swept the lines, And the clang of war above them swelled with loud and louder signs, Ti
Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 23
10. the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle
10. the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 23
one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glasses in a hurried rush to arms. Then together up the
C. D. Meigs (search for this): chapter 23
10. the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle
10. the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle