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ace, two excellent earthworks are thrown up, one of which commands the river for more than two miles. It was my intention to burn the town; but finding so many women and children in it, I spared it. We found there three thirty-two pounder guns and carriages. The guns I brought away, and burnt the carriages and platforms. Hearing that the rebels had a pontoon-bridge a mile from the mouth of Little River, I sent the Cricket up, and burned it. I remained at Trinity until the morning of the fourth, when we proceeded down Black River, and picking up all the cotton near the bank, anchored at dark about twelve miles from the mouth. At daylight on the fifth, I got under way, and arrived at this place at meridian. I am much indebted to the officers of the different vessels for the manner in which they performed their duty. I regret to report that eight men were wounded on the Fort Hindman, one mortally, (since dead,) and two severely. One man was wounded severely on the Osage; Acting
March 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 104
and fourteen wounded, and the Fort Hindman was badly cut up with shot and shell, being struck twenty-seven times, but nothing to impair her efficiency. I inclose Lieutenant Commander Ramsay's report. I am well pleased with the result of the expedition. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Lieutenant Commander F. A. Ramsay. United States steamship Choctaw, March 5, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order, I left here on the Fort Hindman at half-past 1 P. M. on the twenty-ninth ultimo, taking the Osage, Cricket, Ouachita, Lexington, and Conestoga with me, and proceeding up Red River, anchored at dark about fifteen miles from the mouth of Black River. At daylight on the first instant, I got under way and proceeded up Black River. At four P. M., when about fifteen miles below Trinity, we were fired into by sharp-shooters, concealed behind the levee. Al
e Black and Washita Rivers. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Red River, March 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that I sent an expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers on the first instant, under command of Lieutenant Commander F. M. Ramsay. The following vessels composed the expedition: Ouachita, Lieutenant Commander Byron Wilson; Fort Hindman, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant John Pierce; Osage, Acting Master Thomas Wright; Lexinndman at half-past 1 P. M. on the twenty-ninth ultimo, taking the Osage, Cricket, Ouachita, Lexington, and Conestoga with me, and proceeding up Red River, anchored at dark about fifteen miles from the mouth of Black River. At daylight on the first instant, I got under way and proceeded up Black River. At four P. M., when about fifteen miles below Trinity, we were fired into by sharp-shooters, concealed behind the levee. All the vessels immediately opened on them with shrapnel, grape, and can
vessels immediately opened on them with shrapnel, grape, and canister, and drove them away. When we reached Trinity, white flags were shown on the lower side of the town, but as soon as we rounded the point we were opened on by a battery of two twelve-pounder rifle guns. We immediately opened fire, and in a few moments drove the rebels, who were under the command of General Polignac, from the town. I then proceeded two miles above the town, and anchored for the night. At daylight on the second, I got under way, and proceeded up the Ouachita, with the Osage leading and the Hindman next. We had not proceeded more than five miles when the Osage became disabled, by the main wheel of the turret breaking in three pieces, which rendered it impossible to revolve the turret. Fortunately, the guns were pointed directly ahead at the time of the accident. When we arrived within two miles of Harrisonburgh, we were attacked by a brigade (General Polignac's) of sharp-shooters, lying behind th
March 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 104
ounded, since dead; eight wounded, two severely; hit twenty-seven times. Osage, one wounded. Ouachita, one killed; two wounded; struck three times. Choctaw, one wounded. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, F. M. Ramsay, Commanding Expedition to Black and Washita Rivers. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Surgeon Mixer's account. Surgeon Mixer was attached to the Lexington. United States steamer Lexington, off Trinity, Ouachita River, March 2, 1864. . . . . . . . . The Admiral came down on the afternoon of the twenty-ninth of February, and, true to my prediction, he has furnished us with something to do. We are on an expedition up the Ouachita. (Pronounce that Washitaw.) There are six vessels in the fleet, carrying seventy guns. The Ouachita rises in Arkansas, and empties into the Red, about forty-five miles from the mouth of the latter. The last sixty miles of the course of the Ouachita is sometimes called the Black River.
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