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Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 118
dred and Fifty-fifth New-York regiment, at Sangster's Station, in the midst of the terrible storm then raging, were attacked by a body of Stuart's rebel cavalry, about one thousand strong, under command of the rebel General Bower, which left Fredericksburgh on Wednesday night last, on this raid. Contrary to their expectations, the company on railroad guard duty there made a gallant, and, as it turned out, successful resistance, having beaten them off four times before being flanked, and havien attempted to burn the bridge over Pope's Run, but took a stampede before succeeding in doing it any damage to speak of, as it was repaired in two hours this morning, and the trains are now running. On running off, the rebels sent back to Fredericksburgh three ambulance loads of their wounded, and left one prisoner in our hands. They left in the direction of Centreville. As soon as daylight appeared, General Corcoran, in command of Fairfax, sent cavalry in pursuit of the foe, and has sin
Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 118
es before being flanked, and having all their tents burned by a portion of the enemy, who got in the rear. The company was then forced to retire with a loss of but two men wounded and one taken prisoner. The rebels then attempted to burn the bridge over Pope's Run, but took a stampede before succeeding in doing it any damage to speak of, as it was repaired in two hours this morning, and the trains are now running. On running off, the rebels sent back to Fredericksburgh three ambulance loads of their wounded, and left one prisoner in our hands. They left in the direction of Centreville. As soon as daylight appeared, General Corcoran, in command of Fairfax, sent cavalry in pursuit of the foe, and has since reported that its advance had came up with the rebel rear. The wounded rebel taken prisoner has since died. His name was Van Meter, of Captain Cortwell's company, Eleventh Virginia cavalry. He reports his captain and four horses of his company as amongst the rebel killed.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 118
Doc. 115.-raid of Stuart's cavalry on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Washington, Dec. 16, 1863. Lieutenant Peck, of the Second regiment District volunteers, gives the particulars of a bold raid made by Stuart's cavalry, last night, upon the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, about one mile and a half beyond Fairfax Station. The rebels, about eight hundred strong, and accompanied by the notorious Mosby, at six o'clock attacked the guard upon the railroad at that point, which consicapture. It is quite likely that the rebels committed further outrages upon the railroad beyond Pope Run, of which we have not been informed. This raid revives very forcibly the former exploits of Stuart's cavalry in this line of business. Washington, December eighteenth.--The Star has the following account of the raid: We learn, through despatches received at headquarters of this department, from General Corcoran, that last night company I, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New-York re
Second District of Columbia volunteers, at Fairfax Station, and he started with his command to reinforce the attacked. The progress of the train was stopped at Pope Run, where the rebels had burned the bridge and torn up the track for about two miles. When Colonel Drew arrived at Pope Run, it was extremely dark, and the rain Pope Run, it was extremely dark, and the rain poured down furiously. He fired several volleys at the rebels, which they returned. None of our men were wounded. It was evidently the object of the raiders to capture a railroad train from Alexandria, loaded with large quantities of provisions and forage for the army, which was due at the time. The train happened to be an hour and a half late, and consequently escaped capture. It is quite likely that the rebels committed further outrages upon the railroad beyond Pope Run, of which we have not been informed. This raid revives very forcibly the former exploits of Stuart's cavalry in this line of business. Washington, December eighteenth.--The Sta
G. H. Stuart (search for this): chapter 118
Doc. 115.-raid of Stuart's cavalry on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Washington, Dec. 16, 1863. Lieutenant Peck, of the Second regiment District volunteers, gives the particulars of a bold raid made by Stuart's cavalry, last night, upStuart's cavalry, last night, upon the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, about one mile and a half beyond Fairfax Station. The rebels, about eight hundred strong, and accompanied by the notorious Mosby, at six o'clock attacked the guard upon the railroad at that point, which consithe railroad beyond Pope Run, of which we have not been informed. This raid revives very forcibly the former exploits of Stuart's cavalry in this line of business. Washington, December eighteenth.--The Star has the following account of the raid: ifth New-York regiment, at Sangster's Station, in the midst of the terrible storm then raging, were attacked by a body of Stuart's rebel cavalry, about one thousand strong, under command of the rebel General Bower, which left Fredericksburgh on Wedne
Doc. 115.-raid of Stuart's cavalry on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Washington, Dec. 16, 1863. Lieutenant Peck, of the Second regiment District volunteers, gives the particulars of a bold raid made by Stuart's cavalry, last night, upon the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, about one mile and a half beyond Fairfax Station. The rebels, about eight hundred strong, and accompanied by the notorious Mosby, at six o'clock attacked the guard upon the railroad at that point, which consisted of company I, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New-York regiment The company made a brave resistance, and were only captured by the cavalry entirely surrounding them. The rebels had previously cut the telegraph wires, but word was conveyed as quickly as possible to Colonel Drew, in command of a battalion of four companies of the Second District of Columbia volunteers, at Fairfax Station, and he started with his command to reinforce the attacked. The progress of the train was stopped
mes before being flanked, and having all their tents burned by a portion of the enemy, who got in the rear. The company was then forced to retire with a loss of but two men wounded and one taken prisoner. The rebels then attempted to burn the bridge over Pope's Run, but took a stampede before succeeding in doing it any damage to speak of, as it was repaired in two hours this morning, and the trains are now running. On running off, the rebels sent back to Fredericksburgh three ambulance loads of their wounded, and left one prisoner in our hands. They left in the direction of Centreville. As soon as daylight appeared, General Corcoran, in command of Fairfax, sent cavalry in pursuit of the foe, and has since reported that its advance had came up with the rebel rear. The wounded rebel taken prisoner has since died. His name was Van Meter, of Captain Cortwell's company, Eleventh Virginia cavalry. He reports his captain and four horses of his company as amongst the rebel killed.
Arthur Corcoran (search for this): chapter 118
forcibly the former exploits of Stuart's cavalry in this line of business. Washington, December eighteenth.--The Star has the following account of the raid: We learn, through despatches received at headquarters of this department, from General Corcoran, that last night company I, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New-York regiment, at Sangster's Station, in the midst of the terrible storm then raging, were attacked by a body of Stuart's rebel cavalry, about one thousand strong, under command the trains are now running. On running off, the rebels sent back to Fredericksburgh three ambulance loads of their wounded, and left one prisoner in our hands. They left in the direction of Centreville. As soon as daylight appeared, General Corcoran, in command of Fairfax, sent cavalry in pursuit of the foe, and has since reported that its advance had came up with the rebel rear. The wounded rebel taken prisoner has since died. His name was Van Meter, of Captain Cortwell's company, El
oits of Stuart's cavalry in this line of business. Washington, December eighteenth.--The Star has the following account of the raid: We learn, through despatches received at headquarters of this department, from General Corcoran, that last night company I, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New-York regiment, at Sangster's Station, in the midst of the terrible storm then raging, were attacked by a body of Stuart's rebel cavalry, about one thousand strong, under command of the rebel General Bower, which left Fredericksburgh on Wednesday night last, on this raid. Contrary to their expectations, the company on railroad guard duty there made a gallant, and, as it turned out, successful resistance, having beaten them off four times before being flanked, and having all their tents burned by a portion of the enemy, who got in the rear. The company was then forced to retire with a loss of but two men wounded and one taken prisoner. The rebels then attempted to burn the bridge ove
es before being flanked, and having all their tents burned by a portion of the enemy, who got in the rear. The company was then forced to retire with a loss of but two men wounded and one taken prisoner. The rebels then attempted to burn the bridge over Pope's Run, but took a stampede before succeeding in doing it any damage to speak of, as it was repaired in two hours this morning, and the trains are now running. On running off, the rebels sent back to Fredericksburgh three ambulance loads of their wounded, and left one prisoner in our hands. They left in the direction of Centreville. As soon as daylight appeared, General Corcoran, in command of Fairfax, sent cavalry in pursuit of the foe, and has since reported that its advance had came up with the rebel rear. The wounded rebel taken prisoner has since died. His name was Van Meter, of Captain Cortwell's company, Eleventh Virginia cavalry. He reports his captain and four horses of his company as amongst the rebel killed.
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