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and eight wagons loaded with commissary stores, were destroyed during the raid. Captain Paine, of the Topographical Engineers, accompanied the expedition for the purpose of making observations, and gained very important and valuable information appertaining to his department. We lost none in killed, and but ten or twelve wounded. We lost none in prisoners. Another account. headquarters Second Rhode-Island volunteers, Brandy Station, March 8, 1864. On Friday evening, the twenty-sixth ultimo, our entire corps, the Sixth, together with the Third division of the Third, received orders to be prepared to move early on Saturday morning with five days rations and forty rounds of ammunition. All baggage, stores and tents were to be left, and the weak and sick were to remain as camp-guards. Already our pickets had been relieved by the First division of the Third corps, and the extra rations issued. We at once concluded that this was no false alarm. Saturday morning came, as b
March 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 144
Doc. 133.-General Custer's expedition toward Charlottesville, Va. Culpeper Court-house, Va., Wednesday Morning, March 2, 1864. General Custer's reconnoitring expedition returned to camp last night after having completed, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth ostensible purpose, the whole character and manner of the move indicates that it was but a feint to draw attention and forces in this direction while other and more important movements are made elsewhere. Another account. Washington, March 2, 1864. General Custer, with one thousand five hundred picked men, in light marching order, left Culpeper Court-House about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. The Sixth and Third corps marched from their winter quarters earlier in the day. The f
March 8th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 144
forges, a complete set of artillery-harness, and eight wagons loaded with commissary stores, were destroyed during the raid. Captain Paine, of the Topographical Engineers, accompanied the expedition for the purpose of making observations, and gained very important and valuable information appertaining to his department. We lost none in killed, and but ten or twelve wounded. We lost none in prisoners. Another account. headquarters Second Rhode-Island volunteers, Brandy Station, March 8, 1864. On Friday evening, the twenty-sixth ultimo, our entire corps, the Sixth, together with the Third division of the Third, received orders to be prepared to move early on Saturday morning with five days rations and forty rounds of ammunition. All baggage, stores and tents were to be left, and the weak and sick were to remain as camp-guards. Already our pickets had been relieved by the First division of the Third corps, and the extra rations issued. We at once concluded that this was
p the river on our right to reconnoitre the enemy's position, while a squadron of the Fifth regulars, under command of Captain Ash, was sent down the river on our left for a similar purpose. Discovering an artillery camp some distance down the river, Captain Ash, with his squadron, consisting of. only sixty men, immediately charged it, destroying the huts, blowing up six caissons, and burning two battery-forges, together. with a quantity of harness belonging to the battery. Captain Ash's Captain Ash's gallantry, and the bravery of his men in accomplishing this feat in the face of a rebel cavalry brigade (Wickham's) drawn up in the woods not over three hundred yards distant, are universally mentioned in terms of the highest commendation. The enemged, and in close proximity to the caissons. The Fifth regular regiment of General Merritt's old brigade led the van. Captain Ash, with one squadron, dashed among the comfortable-looking huts with reckless precipitancy, and scattered the inmates in
Va., Wednesday Morning, March 2, 1864. General Custer's reconnoitring expedition returned to camth his insignificant force being apparent, General Custer retired-his column up the Stannardsville r approach. Without a moment's hesitation, General Custer conceived and executed a plan for his extrnger of their friends' position, and believing Custer determined to cross at Burton's Ford, came dow the river to their support. It was then that Custer's tactics became apparent to the astonished enommand. The tactical ability displayed by General Custer, is spoken of in the most complimentary teess generally known that the reconnaissance by Custer, supported by infantry, was a simple diversioness southward. After a brief engagement General Custer retreated on the Stannardsville road. Finrear. The next morning about nine o'clock General Custer marched toward the right road, and having oceed. No intelligence had been received from Custer. His troops had consumed their scanty store[18 more...]
Doc. 133.-General Custer's expedition toward Charlottesville, Va. Culpeper Court-house, Va., Wednesday Morning, March 2, 1864. General Custer's reconnoitring expedition returned to camp last night after having completed, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New-York, and First New-Jersey cavalry, in all, one thousand five hundred men, passed through Madison Court-House early that morning. One section of Captain French's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Porter, accompanied the cavalry. The troops were in light marching order, and moved rapidly toward Stannardsville, distant south-west from Madison twelve miles, crossing the Rapidan at Banks's Mills Ford. At Stannardsville the enemy's pickets were discovered, who
e troops were in light marching order, and moved rapidly toward Stannardsville, distant south-west from Madison twelve miles, crossing the Rapidan at Banks's Mills Ford. At Stannardsville the enemy's pickets were discovered, who retired precipitately before our advance. Meeting with no opposition, General Custer pushed forward tbel prisoners were taken, who stated that the whole of Wickham's brigade, commanded by Stuart in person, was in our front, the major portion being at Banks's Mills Ford awaiting Custer's approach. Without a moment's hesitation, General Custer conceived and executed a plan for his extrication from his perilous situation. Orderingalmost instantly moving down the road with the speed of the wind toward the Stannardsville road, which striking, he wheeled to the left, and reaching Banks's Mills Ford, recrossed the river, thus completely eluding the mass of the enemy, who seemed confident of gobbling his whole command. The tactical ability displayed by General
William H. French (search for this): chapter 144
to camp last night after having completed, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New-York, and First New-Jersey cavalry, in all, one thousand five hundred men, passed through Madison Court-House early that morning. One section of Captain French's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Porter, accompanied the cavalry. The troops were in light marching order, and moved rapidly toward Stannardsville, distant south-west from Madison twelve miles, crossing the Rapidan at Banks's Mills Ford. At Stannardsville the enemy's pickets were discovered, who retired precipitately before our advance. Meeting with no opposition, General Custer pushed forward to the Rivanna River, crossing at Berner's Bridge, a long wooden structure spanning the
le, in order to recuperate the exhausted artillery-horses. Lieutenant-Colonel Stedman, of the Sixth Ohio, commanding the detachment of five hundred men from General Gregg's division, being in advance of the main body and ignorant of the fact that the column had halted, continued the march toward Madison Court-House, arriving theut two A. M., on Monday, the raiders left their resting place near James City, and took the road for Charlottesville. The men had been picked from Merritt's and Gregg's divisions, and were well mounted. When they marched up the steep banks of the Rivanna River their coming was unknown, and altogether unexpected. Before us, thecould be found in the neighborhood destroyed. In returning, the advance was given to Colonel Stedman, who commands a battalion of five hundred men chosen from General Gregg's division. The night was dark and the rain, that continued to fall, was mingled with sleet. Custer, who followed with a thousand men, composing the remn
P. M. Hundreds (search for this): chapter 144
cuted, with the loss of five wounded. About twenty prisoners were here captured, and were brought in, the entire command reaching the infantry lines at Madison about four P. M. on Tuesday. The infantry were all immediately withdrawn to the north side of Robertson's River, and the south side left to the possession of the rebel cavalry who followed closely in small numbers without attempting to molest our rear. We started home again Wednesday morning, reaching our old camp at half-past 4 P. M. Hundreds of contrabands returned along with us, men, women and children, on horseback, in all conceivable sorts of vehicles, drawn by oxen, horses, or mules, as could be obtained for the purpose, or on foot where no conveyance offered. These were goin norf by de grace of God, having been in de souf long enough now. The ostensible purpose of the expedition was the destruction of military stores, of which Charlottesville is an extensive depot and the cutting of the railroads concentrating at th
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