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t that I had accomplished the first great step in the problem for the relief of General Burnside's army, but still urged on the work. As soon as the bridge was mended, all the troops moved forward. General Howard had marched from Loudon and had formed a pretty good ford for his wagons and horses at Davis, seven miles from Morgantown, and had made an ingenious bridge of the wagons left by Vaughn at Loudon, on which to pass his men. He marched by Unitia and Louisville. On the night of the fifth, all the heads of columns communicated at Marysville, where I met Major Van Buren, of General Burnside's staff, announcing that Longstreet had the night before retreated on the Rutledge, Rodgersville, and Bristol road, leading to Virginia; that General Burnside's cavalry was on his heels; that the General desired to see me in person as soon as I could come to Knoxville. I ordered all the troops to halt and rest, except the two divisions of General Granger, which were ordered to move forward
ch to the relief of Burnside. General Elliot had been ordered by Thomas, on the twenty-sixth of November, to proceed from Alexandria, Tennessee, to Knoxville, with his cavalry division, to aid in the relief of that place. The approach of Sherman caused Longstreet to raise the siege of Knoxville and retreat eastward on the night of the fourth of December. Sherman succeeded in throwing his cavalry into Knoxville on the night of the third. Sherman arrived in person at Knoxville on the sixth, and after a conference with Burnside in reference to t organizing a pursuing force large enough to overtake the enemy and beat him, or drive him out of the State, Burnside was of the opinion that the corps of Granger, in conjunction with his own command, was sufficient for that purpose, and on the seventh addressed to Sherman the following communication: Knoxville, Dec. 7, 1863. To Major-General Sherman: I desire to express to you and your command my most hearty thanks and gratitud
On the morning of the twenty-eighth, we took up the march for this place, which was reached the evening of the seventh instant. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. B. Hazen, Brigadier-General. headquarters Second brigade, T I respectfully submit the following report of the operations of my command from the twenty-third of November to the seventh instant, inclusive. Being on picket in front of Chattanooga at two P. M., November twenty-third, I received orders to depnooga, to prepare to set out for Knoxville, which point we reached, after ten days marching, on the afternoon of the seventh instant. Inclosed you will please find lists of the killed and wounded of the Sixth Indiana and Fifth and Sixth Kentucky mp at Chattanooga, and on the twenty-eighth marched with the brigade for Knoxville, reaching its present camp on the seventh instant. No praise is extravagant when applied to the officers and men whose bravery and zeal carried the enemy's works,
ou. It will be entirely out of the question to send for ten thousand men, not because they cannot be spared, but how could they be fed after they got one day east of here? U. S. Grant, Major-General. To Major-General A. E. Burnside. On the fifteenth--having received from the General-in-Chief a despatch of date the fourteenth, in reference to Burnside's position, the danger of his abandonment of East-Tennessee unless immediate relief was afforded, and the terrible misfortune such a result w I immediately telegraphed to the Commanding-General my arrival and the position of my several divisions, and was summoned to Chattanooga. I took the first boat during the night of the fourteenth for Kelly's, and rode into Chattanooga on the fifteenth. I then learned the post assigned me in the coming drama, was supplied with the necessary maps and information, and rode, during the sixteenth, in company with Generals Grant, Thomas, W. F. Smith, Brannan, and others, to the position on the
just made from Whitesides to Kelly's Ferry, thus being concealed from the enemy, and leave him to suppose the whole force is going up Lookout valley. Sherman's advance has only just reached Bridgeport. The rear will only reach there on the sixteenth. This will bring it to the nine-teenth as the earliest day for making the combined movement as desired. Inform me if you think you can sustain yourself till that time. I can hardly conceive of the enemy breaking through at Kingston, and push that the enemy should not discover the movement. General Sherman then returned to Bridgeport to direct the movements of his troops. Colonel Long, (Fourth Ohio cavalry,) commanding Second brigade, Second division cavalry, was ordered on the sixteenth. to report at Chattanooga on Saturday, the twenty-first, by noon, the intention being for him to follow up the left flank of Sherman's troops, and if not required by General Sherman, he was to cross the Chickamauga, make a raid upon the enemy'
ddy's and Furgeson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Osterihau's division was in the advance, constantly skirmishing with the enemy. It was supported by Morgan L. Smih the First division of cavalry, at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Hint Ridge, cast of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments f attack was ordered to be made on the enemy's extreme right at daylight on the twenty-first of November, and that preparatory orders were sent through me on the eighteenth, for the Eleventh corps to cross to the north bank of the Tennessee River on the twentieth. At this time the Eleventh corps and a part of the Twelfth corps wer
o came into our lines on the night of the twenty-second November, reported Bragg falling back. The following letter, received from Bragg by flag of truce on the twentieth, tended to confirm this report: headquarters army of the Tennessee, in the field, November 20, 1868. Major-General U. S. Grant, Commanding United States Fo cut up and encumbered with the wagons of other troops stationed along the road. I reached General Hooker's headquarters during a rain in the afternoon of the twentieth, and met General Grant's orders for the general attack for the next day. It was simply impossible for me to fill my post in time. Only one division, General Joh of November, and that preparatory orders were sent through me on the eighteenth, for the Eleventh corps to cross to the north bank of the Tennessee River on the twentieth. At this time the Eleventh corps and a part of the Twelfth corps were encamped in Lookout Valley, opposite to the left of the enemy's line. In consequence of t
or who labored harder to fulfil their part. On a proper representation, General Grant postponed the attack. On the twenty-first, I got the Second division over Brown's Ferry Bridge, and General Ewing got up, but the bridge broke repeatedly, and dlas reported to be swarming about in that region, arresting and robbing Union citizens. General Crook reports, on the twenty-first, that an expedition sent down the Tennessee had destroyed nine boats between Whitesburgh and Decatur, some of them sixding Second brigade, Second division cavalry, was ordered on the sixteenth. to report at Chattanooga on Saturday, the twenty-first, by noon, the intention being for him to follow up the left flank of Sherman's troops, and if not required by General e of Brigadier-General J. C. Davis's division of the Fourteenth corps, who reported for duty to General Sherman on the twenty-first. General Granger's command returned to Chattanooga, with instructions to prepare and hold themselves in readiness f
iver having risen, both pontoon-bridges were broken by rafts sent down the river by the enemy, cutting off Osterhaus's division from the balance of Sherman's troops. It was thought this would delay us another day; but during the night of the twenty-second, two deserters reported that Bragg had fallen back, and that there was only a strong picket-line in our front. Early on the morning of the twenty-third, I received a note from Major-General Grant directing me to ascertain by a demonstration lied on to lead off, the attack was postponed until the following morning, and again postponed until the twenty-fourth, for the same reason. Meanwhile orders were received for the Eleventh corps to go to Chattanooga, where it reported on the twenty-second. This divided my command, and, as the orders contemplated no advance from Lookout Valley, application was made by me to the Major-General commanding the department, for authority to accompany the Eleventh corps, assigning, as a reason, that
unable to get up until the afternoon of the twenty-third, and then only with Generals Morgan L. Smithe south side, and was, on the night of the twenty-third, ordered, unless it could get across by eigs was directed, early on the morning of the twenty-third, to ascertain the truth or falsity of this serious loss. Thomas having done on the twenty-third, with his troops in Chattanooga, what was i and day, and General Ewing got over on the twenty-third, but my rear division was cut off by the br in our front. Early on the morning of the twenty-third, I received a note from Major-General Grant battalions were similar to that on the twenty-third instant; the Sixth Kentucky reporting to Colonenemy's works, under such heavy loss, on the twenty-third, and climbed the apparently impregnable heithe Twenty-eighth Alabama regiment. On the twenty-third, Sergeant D. L. Sutphin, Ninety-third Ohio d and three wounded. On the night of the twenty-third, the regiment was occupied in strengthening[4 more...]
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