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veland, also reports that he was attacked early this morning, December twenty-eighth, by a force of one hundred rebels. He drove them off, however. Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General Commanding. Colonel Laibold's report. camp near Calhoun, December 28, 1863. sir: It affords me great pleasure to report to you that I have given the rebel General Wheeler a sound thrashing this morning. I had succeeded, in spite of the most abominable roads, to reach Charlestown on the night of the twenty-seventh, and this morning, shortly after daylight, I was moving my train across the Hiawassee River bridge, when Wheeler's cavalry — reported one thousand five hundred men strong, with four pieces of artillery, which, however, they had no time to bring into action — appeared on my rear. I placed my infantry in line of battle, then got my train over the bridge safely, and asked Colonel Long to place a regiment of cavalry at my disposal. These arrangements made, I charged with my infantry, on th
o halt on account of the slow progress of the train. In the evening of that day, a flag of truce came into my lines, with despatches to Generals Grant and Thomas, and a mail, and I have no doubt that the bearer of that flag gave information which induced Wheeler to follow my track. The miserable state of the weather and worse condition of the roads, prevented me from moving fast, and it was the twenty-seventh before I reached Charlestown on the Hiawassee River. On the morning of the twenty-eighth, I commenced moving my train across a temporary bridge on the ties of the railroad structure, but had only a few wagons over when it was found necessary to dig a new road in the railroad dyke. Whilst this was being done, Wheeler, with two divisions of cavalry, (Generals Kelly's and Preston's,) made a rush at the train. I immediately advanced my skirmishers, and silently formed my command in line of battle, covering completely, at the same time, all avenues of approach. I then saw th
December 23rd (search for this): chapter 32
mounted infantry belong the honor of this last important achievement, which resulted in securing a connection of the highest importance to the country. Colonel Laibold's letter. Loudon, Tenn., January 1, 1864. sir: Being well aware of the flattering interest you take in my movements, I take pleasure in informing you that I have had an engagement with the rebel General Wheeler, on the twenty-eighth of December, giving him the soundest thrashing he ever received. On the twenty-third of December, I was given command of a detachment of the Fourth army corps, consisting principally of convalescents of the two last battles, camp retainers, etc., and a train of about one hundred and fifty wagons, with orders to join the army corps at Knoxville. On. the twenty-fourth, I started from Chattanooga, and proceeded about eight miles, to a place near Chickamauga River,being necessitated to halt on account of the slow progress of the train. In the evening of that day, a flag of truce
December 28th (search for this): chapter 32
onel long, of the Fourth Ohio cavalry, commanding the Second division of cavalry, reports from Cahoun, Tennessee, December twenty-eighth: The rebel General Wheeler, with one thousand two hundred or one thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infThe officer in command of the courier station at Cleveland, also reports that he was attacked early this morning, December twenty-eighth, by a force of one hundred rebels. He drove them off, however. Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General Commanding. Coi Infantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Fullerton, Adjutant-General Fourth Corps. A national account. Chattanooga, Monday, December 28. An important victory has just been added to the list which has crowned the army of the Cumberland with glory. ovements, I take pleasure in informing you that I have had an engagement with the rebel General Wheeler, on the twenty-eighth of December, giving him the soundest thrashing he ever received. On the twenty-third of December, I was given command of
December 31st (search for this): chapter 32
tay) eleven rebels, wounded over thirty, amongst them General Kelly and Colonel Wade; and the number of small arms thrown away by the valiant warriors must amount to between three and four hundred. Being obliged to proceed upon my march, I had to leave it to the cavalry to bring in the small arms thrown away, and, I have no doubt, they captured a good many more prisoners, as large numbers of the enemy scattered in different directions to hide in the woods. Wheeler moved post haste into Georgia, with a couple of hundred men of his command, bare-headed, and without arms. I started next day, according to orders, and arrived at this place on the thirty-first December, all safe. The casualties in my command, in the engagement, were two officers wounded, two men killed, and twelve wounded; amongst them none of the few Missouri troops with me. Your obedient servant, Bernard Laibold, Colonel Second Infantry, Missouri Volunteers. John B. Gray, Adjutant-General State of Missouri.
December 28th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 32
Doc. 30.-battle at Charlestown, Tenn. General Thomas's report. Chattanooga, December 28, 1863. To Major-General Halleck: Colonel long, of the Fourth Ohio cavalry, commanding the Second division of cavalry, reports from Cahoun, Tennessee, December twenty-eighth: The rebel General Wheeler, with one thousand two hundred or one thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, attacked Colonel Siebert, and captured a supply-train from Chattanooga, for Knoxville, about ten o'clockd, also reports that he was attacked early this morning, December twenty-eighth, by a force of one hundred rebels. He drove them off, however. Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General Commanding. Colonel Laibold's report. camp near Calhoun, December 28, 1863. sir: It affords me great pleasure to report to you that I have given the rebel General Wheeler a sound thrashing this morning. I had succeeded, in spite of the most abominable roads, to reach Charlestown on the night of the twenty-seve
January 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 32
disrepute, and are no longer looked upon as of importance to the army. Our loss in the engagement is variously estimated at from one to ten wounded, all agreeing that none of our gallant men were killed, though one was taken prisoner. To the Fourth Ohio cavalry and Twentieth Missouri mounted infantry belong the honor of this last important achievement, which resulted in securing a connection of the highest importance to the country. Colonel Laibold's letter. Loudon, Tenn., January 1, 1864. sir: Being well aware of the flattering interest you take in my movements, I take pleasure in informing you that I have had an engagement with the rebel General Wheeler, on the twenty-eighth of December, giving him the soundest thrashing he ever received. On the twenty-third of December, I was given command of a detachment of the Fourth army corps, consisting principally of convalescents of the two last battles, camp retainers, etc., and a train of about one hundred and fifty wag
Doc. 30.-battle at Charlestown, Tenn. General Thomas's report. Chattanooga, December 28, 1863. To Major-General Halleck: Colonel long, of the Fourth Ohio cavalry, commanding the Second division of cavalry, reports from Cahoun, Tennessee, December twenty-eighth: The rebel General Wheeler, with one thousand two hundred or one thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, attacked Colonel Siebert, and captured a supply-train from Chattanooga, for Knoxville, about ten o'clock this morning, at Charlestown, on the south bank of the Hiawassee. The train escort had reached the encampment at Charlestown last night, and Colonel Siebert's skirmishers hotly engaged with the enemy this morning before Colonel Long was apprised of their approach. He immediately moved the small force for duty in his camp at the time--one hundred and fifty men — crossed to Colonel Siebert's support. The rebels shortly after gave way, Colonel Long pursuing them closely, discovering a portio
Doc. 30.-battle at Charlestown, Tenn. General Thomas's report. Chattanooga, December 28, 1863. To Major-General Halleck: Colonel long, of the Fourth Ohio cavalry, commanding the Second division of cavalry, reports from Cahoun, Tennessee, December twenty-eighth: The rebel General Wheeler, with one thousand two hundred or one thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, attacked Colonel Siebert, and captured a supply-train from Chattanooga, for Knoxville, about ten o'clock this morning, at Charlestown, on the south bank of the Hiawassee. The train escort had reached the encampment at Charlestown last night, and Colonel Siebert's skirmishers hotly engaged with the enemy this morning before Colonel Long was apprised of their approach. He immediately moved the small force for duty in his camp at the time--one hundred and fifty men — crossed to Colonel Siebert's support. The rebels shortly after gave way, Colonel Long pursuing them closely, discovering a porti
men killed, eight wounded, and one missing. Second division--Four men wounded. The rebels lost, beside the number stated, several severely wounded, which I am obliged to leave behind, and probably several killed. The number of small arms thrown away by them is rather large, and they will, undoubtedly, be gathered by Colonel Long. I shall pursue my march at daybreak to-morrow. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Bernard Laibold, Colonel Second Missouri Infantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Fullerton, Adjutant-General Fourth Corps. A national account. Chattanooga, Monday, December 28. An important victory has just been added to the list which has crowned the army of the Cumberland with glory. True, the fight was upon a comparatively small scale; but victories are not always to be valued by the numbers engaged, nor the list of the slain. The importance of an achievement must be estimated by results; and, in this instance, it would be impossible to compute the magn
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