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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Vidalia (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
Doc. 76.-fight at Vidalia, La. Natchez, Miss., February 16, 1864. Since my last communication, nothing noteworthy has occurred here, except the capture of Captain Call and twenty-six of thearrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery ofry were sent out to watch the enemy, and hovering around his advance gradually fell back toward Vidalia. On the morning of the seventh, messengers brought in word of their steady advance, and at two; that the plan had been well laid, and all means taken to insure an attack on both Natchez and Vidalia at once; that he considered himself fortunate in coming off so easily, and that he fully expected to capture or drive into the river every Yankee at Vidalia. If the attack had been simultaneous, they would have caught a tartar, for Colonel Johnson, commanding here, contemplating such a move,
Trinity (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
eir wounded, commenced a rapid retreat. The Twenty-ninth Illinois, Colonel L. Kent, now came up on the double-quick, not being able to cross the river sooner. They were ordered forward in pursuit, trying, if possible, to cut off retreat by the Trinity road. Darkness and an intervening gully prevented this. Colonel Farrar having been peremptorily ordered to act strictly on the defensive, called off his troops from the pursuit, and the Twenty-ninth recrossed the river the same night. Sennoissance the next morning, under Lieutenant-Colonel Schadt, of the Thirtieth Missouri, it was found that the enemy had never halted in his flight until ten miles from the field of battle, and that they were then in full and rapid retreat toward Trinity or Harrisonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one batt
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
nty-six men were gobbled up. So much for guarding cotton for Jews. Who ordered the Captain out? is now the question. But on Sunday, the seventh instant, the monotony of garrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery of A. D. is stationed. On the evening of the fifth, the Colonel received reliable information that a large force of the enemy risonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one battalion Louisiana cavalry, Major Caldwell. The fight was plainly visible from the bluffs of Natchez — every movement of the enemy, every change of our men could be distinctly seen, and the male and female citizens of this loyal city, who had lined the banks to
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
Doc. 76.-fight at Vidalia, La. Natchez, Miss., February 16, 1864. Since my last communication, nothing noteworthy has occurred here, except the capture of Captain Call and twenty-six of the Twenty-ninth Illinois infantry, of which you have probably heard before the present time. Captain Call was guarding a cotton-train; his men, strung along the length of it, were attacked by a large force of rebel cavalry, part of an escort to a supply-train on its way from above Mobile to Jackson or Brandon, it is reported, and after a sharp fight the Captain, the Quartermaster's Sergeant of the regiment, and twenty-six men were gobbled up. So much for guarding cotton for Jews. Who ordered the Captain out? is now the question. But on Sunday, the seventh instant, the monotony of garrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery of A. D.
Natchez (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
Doc. 76.-fight at Vidalia, La. Natchez, Miss., February 16, 1864. Since my last communication, nothing noteworthy has occurred here, except the capture of Captain Call and twenty-six of the Twenty-ninth Illinois infantry, of which you have probably heard before the present time. Captain Call was guarding a cotton-train; his men, strung along the length of it, were attacked by a large force of rebel cavalry, part of an escort to a supply-train on its way from above Mobile to Jackson or Brandon, it is reported, and after a sharp fight the Captain, the Quartermaster's Sergeant of the regiment, and twenty-six men were gobbled up. So much for guarding cotton for Jews. Who ordered the Captain out? is now the question. But on Sunday, the seventh instant, the monotony of garrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery of A. D.
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
rom the pursuit, and the Twenty-ninth recrossed the river the same night. Sending out a reconnoissance the next morning, under Lieutenant-Colonel Schadt, of the Thirtieth Missouri, it was found that the enemy had never halted in his flight until ten miles from the field of battle, and that they were then in full and rapid retreat toward Trinity or Harrisonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one battalion Louisiana cavalry, Major Caldwell. The fight was plainly visible from the bluffs of Natchez — every movement of the enemy, every change of our men could be distinctly seen, and the male and female citizens of this loyal city, who had lined the banks to see their brave boys drive the Yankees and niggers into the river, had the satisfaction of seeing one thousand Southrons, with a reserve of five
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
e. Lieutenant-Colonel McCaleb, mounted on a large gray horse, was a mark for all the enemy's sharp-shooters, but as cool as on parade, he directed the movements of his men. This is the first action the Second Mississippi artillery has been in, the regiment only being mustered on the twentieth of January; but veterans could not have acted better, and the only trouble the officers had was to keep the men back. It is useless to speak of the Thirtieth Missouri; the bloody fields of Chickasaw, Arkansas Post, and Vicksburgh are their guarantees. If the Twenty-ninth Illinois was not in the fight, it certainly was not their fault, for men never showed more eagerness to be engaged. Strange as it may seem, incredible as it appears to those who witnessed the rapid and incessant firing, not a man on our side was touched. The enemy lost six killed, ten wounded in our hands, and eight prisoners, and how many wounded were taken off in their ambulances it is impossible to say. A negro at w
Brandon (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
76.-fight at Vidalia, La. Natchez, Miss., February 16, 1864. Since my last communication, nothing noteworthy has occurred here, except the capture of Captain Call and twenty-six of the Twenty-ninth Illinois infantry, of which you have probably heard before the present time. Captain Call was guarding a cotton-train; his men, strung along the length of it, were attacked by a large force of rebel cavalry, part of an escort to a supply-train on its way from above Mobile to Jackson or Brandon, it is reported, and after a sharp fight the Captain, the Quartermaster's Sergeant of the regiment, and twenty-six men were gobbled up. So much for guarding cotton for Jews. Who ordered the Captain out? is now the question. But on Sunday, the seventh instant, the monotony of garrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery of A. D. is stat
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
el McCaleb, mounted on a large gray horse, was a mark for all the enemy's sharp-shooters, but as cool as on parade, he directed the movements of his men. This is the first action the Second Mississippi artillery has been in, the regiment only being mustered on the twentieth of January; but veterans could not have acted better, and the only trouble the officers had was to keep the men back. It is useless to speak of the Thirtieth Missouri; the bloody fields of Chickasaw, Arkansas Post, and Vicksburgh are their guarantees. If the Twenty-ninth Illinois was not in the fight, it certainly was not their fault, for men never showed more eagerness to be engaged. Strange as it may seem, incredible as it appears to those who witnessed the rapid and incessant firing, not a man on our side was touched. The enemy lost six killed, ten wounded in our hands, and eight prisoners, and how many wounded were taken off in their ambulances it is impossible to say. A negro at whose house General P
Doc. 76.-fight at Vidalia, La. Natchez, Miss., February 16, 1864. Since my last communication, nothing noteworthy has occurred here, except the capture of Captain Call and twenty-six of the Twenty-ninth Illinois infantry, of which you have probably heard before the present time. Captain Call was guarding a cotton-train; his men, strung along the length of it, were attacked by a large force of rebel cavalry, part of an escort to a supply-train on its way from above Mobile to Jackson or Brandon, it is reported, and after a sharp fight the Captain, the Quartermaster's Sergeant of the regiment, and twenty-six men were gobbled up. So much for guarding cotton for Jews. Who ordered the Captain out? is now the question. But on Sunday, the seventh instant, the monotony of garrison-duty was very summarily broken in upon. Opposite Natchez, in Louisiana, is the town of Vidalia, where a force of — men, under command of Colonel B. G. Farrar, Second Mississippi artillery of A. D.
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