hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 640 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 443 19 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 321 3 Browse Search
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) 296 8 Browse Search
Doc 290 0 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 278 8 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 276 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 267 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 256 0 Browse Search
N. B. Forrest 240 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 214 total hits in 65 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
vant, E. O. C. Ord, Major-General Vols., Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps. Official Copy. C. A. Nichols, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Washburn's report. headquarters detachment Thirteenth army corps, Vermillion bridge, November 7, 1863. Major William Hoffman, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I inclose herewith report of Brigadier-General Burbridge, in regard to the battle of Grand Coteau, on the third instant. Also of Lieutenant-Colonel Robinson, commanding Seconds Louisiana cavalry, and statements of Captain Simms, Sixty-seventh Indiana, and Lieutenant Gorman, Second Louisiana cavalry, who were wounded and taken prisoners, but who were supposed to be privates, and were delivered over, under a flag of truce, with other wounded. On the twenty-seventh instant, the First division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being where they could be moved rapidly to Brashear City, should circumstances req
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received, of the affair at Bayou Bourbeaux, of November third, 1863. Disparaging remarks having appeared in a large part of the public newspapers, upon the management of this affair, by Major-General Washburn, I beg to call attention to the report of that officer, to that of General Burbridge, Colonel Guppy, Twenty-third Wisconsin volunteers, and the order of march of Major-General Franklin, by which it will be seen that General Washburne was at his prescribed post, with his command, on the morning of the attack, and that it was owing to his zeal and diligence that the rear-guard, when attacked, were reinforced promptly, and the enemy driven away discomfited. L
Vermillion (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
he Fourth division, under General Burbridge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its juncture with the Bayou Cutableau. On the morning of the first instant, by order of Major-General Franklin, the troops of the Third division were ordered to march and encamp at Carrion Crow Bayou, while General Burbridge, with the troops under his command, was ordered to march down the Teche and cross it, and move by way of Grand Coteau, where the road from Vermillion to Opelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp there on the north side of the bayou. Colonel Fonda, with about five hundred mounted infantry, was also ordered to encamp near him. The troops all moved and went into camp as ordered. The Nineteenth corps on the same day moved back to Carrion Crow Bayou, and on the following day to Vermillionville, leaving the Third and First brigades of the Fourth division of the
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
though our troops fought most gallantly on that wing, they were compelled to give way before overwhelming numbers. Here it was that we lost most of our men in killed and wounded. The Twenty-third Wisconsin, Colonel Guppy commanding, Ninetysixth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown commanding, and Sixtieth Indiana, commanded by Captain Gatzler, and Seventeenth Ohio battery, Captain Rice commanding, fought with the greatest desperation, holding the enemy in check for a considerable length of time, buounded. This battle opened by a sudden attack of two thousand five hundred rebel infantry upon the Sixtieth Indiana and Ninety-sixth Ohio in the woods, which soon broke and fell back, when the rebel cavalry charged upon the battery, (Seventeeth Ohio,) and captured two guns, one of which was retaken. The charge of the Twenty-third Wisconsin was to save the balance of the battery, and it saved it; but was itself speedily overwhelmed, and compelled to retreat. General Burbridge gives it this c
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rbridge gives it this credit, and of saving what was left of the brigade. It checked the advance long enough to allow a retreat, and certainly it was not in mortal power, under such a fire, to have done more. The brigade went into the fight with one thousand and ten men, and came out with three hundred and sixty-one. The Twenty-third went in with two hundred and six muskets and twenty officers, and came out with ninety-eight men. Being now reduced to a mere company, the authorities in Wisconsin ought, if possible, to secure its return to the State, to recruit up its wasted strength. No braver men ever went upon a battle-field, and, although one of the later regiments, it yields to none in the service it has rendered. The rebel loss was far more severe. Green and Taylor united their forces for the dash, and, from the best sources of information attainable, they brought into the field two thousand five hundred infantry, four thousand cavalry or mounted men, and one battery. E
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received,Copy. W. H. Morgan, Major and Assistant-Adjutant-General. Official Copy. C. A Nichols, Assistant-Adjutant-General. Wisconsin State Journal account. New-Orleans, La., Nov. 9, 1863. I returned yesterday from Opelousas, and hasten to give you the details of a contest at Bayou Bourbeaux, about nine miles this side of thathe skirmish was over, and the forces returned to camp. As an election was to be held in the Twenty-third next day, I gave out tickets I had procured printed in New-Orleans; and Colonel Guppy had requested of General Burbridge lighter duty next day for his men, if possible, so as to allow of their voting and receiving their pay.
Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being whehould circumstances require it. That left at Opelousas the Third division, under General McKinnis, dge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its junctnd Coteau, where the road from Vermillion to Opelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp there on the north side of the , Nov. 9, 1863. I returned yesterday from Opelousas, and hasten to give you the details of a conield, or the reasons for them. We reached Opelousas after dark, on the night of the thirty-firstt Bear's Landing, eleven miles in advance of Opelousas, and came in on another road, camping at Bayou Bourbeaux, three miles nearer Opelousas than the balance of the corps. Impatient to see the boyr, and the whole fronting the north-west, or Opelousas. The prairie rose with a very gentle swell
Carrion Crow Bayou (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e Third division were ordered to march and encamp at Carrion Crow Bayou, while General Burbridge, with the troops under his pelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp the The Nineteenth corps on the same day moved back to Carrion Crow Bayou, and on the following day to Vermillionville, leavinmanding, three thousand strong, with one battery, at Carrion Crow Bayou, three miles in the rear of General Burbridge. The ough very small, behaved very handsomely. I left at Carrion Crow Bayou, to hold that position, three regiments of the Thirds, swept round on our left, and attacked the camp at Carrion Crow Bayou, but they were driven off with a loss of three killewhole army — the Thirteenth and Nineteenth corps--to Carrion Crow Bayou, about twelve miles. The brigade of Colonel Owen, (Gas informed that the whole force was ordered back to Carrion-Crow Bayou, and that it was useless to proceed, as they would l
New Iberia (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
tle of Grand Coteau, on the third instant. Also of Lieutenant-Colonel Robinson, commanding Seconds Louisiana cavalry, and statements of Captain Simms, Sixty-seventh Indiana, and Lieutenant Gorman, Second Louisiana cavalry, who were wounded and taken prisoners, but who were supposed to be privates, and were delivered over, under a flag of truce, with other wounded. On the twenty-seventh instant, the First division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being where they could be moved rapidly to Brashear City, should circumstances require it. That left at Opelousas the Third division, under General McKinnis, and one brigade of the Fourth division, under General Burbridge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its juncture with the Bayou Cutableau. On the morning of the first instant, by order of Major-General Franklin, the troops of the Third division were ordered to march an
Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
obinson, commanding Seconds Louisiana cavalry, and statements of Captain Simms, Sixty-seventh Indiana, and Lieutenant Gorman, Second Louisiana cavalry, who were wounded and taken prisoners, but who were supposed to be privates, and were delivered over, under a flag of truce, with other wounded. On the twenty-seventh instant, the First division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being where they could be moved rapidly to Brashear City, should circumstances require it. That left at Opelousas the Third division, under General McKinnis, and one brigade of the Fourth division, under General Burbridge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its juncture with the Bayou Cutableau. On the morning of the first instant, by order of Major-General Franklin, the troops of the Third division were ordered to march and encamp at Carrion Crow Bayou, while General Burbridge, with the troop
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...