hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 618 total hits in 154 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Lighthouse Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
nd, again, from Fort Wagner, is a new sandwork erected by the rebels since I surveyed the ground from the blockading fleet, a fortnight ago. Finally, down at Lighthouse Inlet, which divides Morris from Folly Island, is another fortification, covering an attempt at a landing at that point. Such is the formidable panorama the eye tach ship in the Admiral's programme, and the position as marked on the diagram — the Keokuk, which brings up the rear of the line, lying down nearly opposite Lighthouse Inlet, and the others extending on at intervals of a cable's length — the Weehawken leading the van. The wooden gunboat fleet lies in reserve outside the bar, cdenly she gives a lurch to one side, and a lurch to the other, and plunges under. She went down at eight o'clock at the spot of her original anchorage, near Lighthouse Inlet, and all that is visible of her is the upper portion of her smoke-stack. Thus ended the brief and glorious career of this interesting vessel — the first i<
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
the time of the official announcement of the inauguration of operations on the first of April, to see that the vast fleet, numbering over one hundred vessels, had really gone. On Thursday, the first of April, Admiral Du Pont and staff left Port Royal on the James Adger, General hunter and staff sailing on the following day in the steamer Ben Deford. The fleet, which for a week or ten days had been dropping away from Port Royal, had been during the same time meeting in rendezvous in North Edisto River, which, you will observe, empties into the sea somewhat over half-way between Port Royal and Charleston harbor, and forms a safe and convenient entrepot for the expedition. Arriving at Edisto on Friday afternoon, (April third,) we found the whole fleet assembled in the embouchure of the river. Tides and winds were now the only conditions that remained to control the movement of the expedition. The iron-clads require all the water over the Charleston bar that the most favorable cir
Canandaigua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
al Drayton. 3. Montauk, Commander John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides, Commodore Thos. Turner. 6. Catskill, Commander Geo. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax. 8. Nahant, Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk, Lieut. Commander Alex. C. Rhind. A squadron of reserve, of which Captain J. F. Green will be senior officer, will be formed out-side the bar, and near the entrance buoy, consisting of the following vessels: Canandaigua, Capt. Joseph H. Green. Unadilla, Lieut. Commander S. P. Quackenbush. Housatonic, Capt. Wm. R. Taylor. Wissahickon, Lieut. Commander J. G. Davis. Huron, Lieut. Commander G. A. Stevens. And will be held in readiness to support the iron-clads when they attack the batteries on Morris Island. S. F. Du Pont, Rear-Admiral Commanding South-Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Nothing now is wanting to the immediate inauguration of the plan of operations thus drawn out, save that eb
Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
ur on that, and so on all round, and it is easy to see that the ordnance is of the most formidable character. From a flag-staff on one of the angles of the fort, floats the confederate flag; from a flag-staff on the opposite angle floats the palmetto flag. Passing now to the left hand side of the harbor, on James Island, we first have the Wappoo battery, near Wappoo Creek, effectually commanding the embouchure of Ashley River and the left side of the city. Next, coming down, we have Fort Johnston, and between it and Castle Pinckney, on an artificial island raised by the rebels, on the middle ground, is Fort Ripley. Coming down to Cumming's Point, directly opposite Moultrie, is the Cumming's Point battery, named by the rebels Battery Bee, after the general of that name; south of Battery Bee, on Morris Island, is Fort Wagner, a very extensive sand battery of the most powerful construction. Half-way down Morris Island, again, from Fort Wagner, is a new sandwork erected by the rebe
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
l construction. Half-way down Morris Island, again, from Fort Wagner, is a new sandwork erected by the rebels since I surveyed the ground from the blockading fleet, a fortnight ago. Finally, down at Lighthouse Inlet, which divides Morris from Folly Island, is another fortification, covering an attempt at a landing at that point. Such is the formidable panorama the eye takes in, in sweeping around the harbor and its approaches, and which you can imagine pictures itself on the retina in much lescould garner in what the navy reaped, but he could do nothing in the heat and labor of the field. The military force, indeed, never got any further up than Stono Inlet, a dozen miles from Charleston harbor, where it was to effect a landing on Folly Island for the purpose of making a diversion. I can make no report of what was done, if any thing, but it had no direct bearing on the business in hand. Thus left alone, the naval chief had eleven hundred men, (the whole force of the iron fleet,) w
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
the sand in the immediate neighborhood. The forces on Sullivan's Island (which is a portion of the sub-division commanded by Brig.-Gen. Trapier) were under the immediate command of Colonel D. M. Keitt, of the Twentieth regiment South-Carolina volunteers. Both General Trapier and Col. Keitt were on the island at the time of action, and during the firing were moving from battery to battery. General Beauregard to the troops. headquarters Department of South-Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, Charleston, S. C., April 10. General orders, no. 55. The Commanding General is gratified to have to announce to the troops the following joint resolutions unanimously adopted by the Legislature of the State of South-Carolina: Resolved, That the General Assembly reposes unbounded confidence in the ability and skill of the Commanding General of this department, and the courage and patriotism of his brave soldiers, with the blessing of God, to defend our beloved city and to beat back
Keokuk, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
es, Commodore Thos. Turner. 6. Catskill, Commander Geo. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax. 8. Nahant, Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk, Lieut. Commander Alex. C. Rhind. A squadron of reserve, of which Captain J. F. Green will be senior officer, will be formed out-side the bar, and near the enttly vindicated within the harbor which we are now to defend. The happy issue of the action on the seventh instant--the stranded, riddled wreck of the iron-mailed Keokuk, her baffled coadjutors forced to retire behind the range of our guns, have inspired confidence in the country that our ultimate success will be complete. An ine with the so-called Devil (a nondescript machine for removing torpedoes) attached to her prow. The second line also consisted of four monitors, the double-turret Keokuk lying on the right. The Ironsides, with Admiral Du Pont on board, held position about equidistant between the two lines and near the centre. The wooden vessels
Beach Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
ets of this character, round which reedy creeks and rivers wind. With Sullivan's Island on our right, we run the eye up to its upper or north end, formed by Breach Inlet. Guarding this point, is Breach Inlet battery — a powerful sand-work, having a circular dome-like bomb-proof magazine in its centre. It is, however, three mipassage through which the great majority of these craft run in) from the approach of our blockaders. At present, it will serve to oppose our landing troops at Breach Inlet, should the attempt be made. Coming down along the shore of Sullivan's Island, from Breach Inlet, we next reach Fort Beauregard, a powerful sand battery, mounBreach Inlet, we next reach Fort Beauregard, a powerful sand battery, mounting very heavy guns, and situated on the turn of the island a little right of the Moultrie House hotel, from which it is separated only by five intervening sea-shore houses. Next, to the right of the channel up and opposite Fort Sumter, is Fort Moultrie, which has been prodigiously strengthened by the rebel engineers, both in it
Snake Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
Sumter that twenty-seven vessels were visible just outside the bar, one of which was the Ironsides, and four were monitors or turreted iron-clads. On the morning of the sixteenth, (Monday,) as the fog lifted, it was discovered that the Ironsides, eight monitors, and a large number of other vessels were in sight, the Ironsides having already crossed the bar and come to anchor off Morris Island. An infantry force, variously estimated at from three thousand to six thousand, was landed on Coles's Island, off the mouth of Stono River, during Sunday night. But before proceeding further, it may be well to restate the names of the torts and batteries that participated in the fight. They are Fort Sumter in the harbor, Fort Wagner and Cumming's Point Battery on Morris Island, the first looking seaward, and the second across the harbor; and Fort Moultrie, Battery Bee, and Battery Beau-regard, on Sullivan's Island. Looking out to sea from Charleston, Morris Island is on the extreme right,
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
y inward, wounded all of the three inmates of the pilot-house — the Captain, (Captain Downs, Massachusetts,) the Pilot, (Isaac Sofield, New-Jersey,) and the Quartermaster, (Edward Cobb, MassachusettsMassachusetts.) The Quartermaster had been struck by the bolt on the back of the skull, which received a compound comminuted fracture. When I saw the poor fellow, late at night, he was in a state of coma, his li were wounded: John McAlister, seaman, (Canada,) concussion of brain; John Jackson, seaman, (Massachusetts ;) Roland Martin, seaman, (Massachusetts ;) and James Murry, seaman, (Massachusetts,) slightMassachusetts ;) and James Murry, seaman, (Massachusetts,) slightly hurt by bolts in the turret. The Passaic also received twenty-five or thirty wounds. The most extraordinary shot was from a large ten-inch rifled projectile, which struck the top of the turretMassachusetts,) slightly hurt by bolts in the turret. The Passaic also received twenty-five or thirty wounds. The most extraordinary shot was from a large ten-inch rifled projectile, which struck the top of the turret, scooping out a huge portion of the iron, breaking all of the eleven plates of an inch thickness each, and spending its force on the pilot-house, (which is placed on the top of the turret,) in which
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...