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Okolona (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
ward from Clear Springs, with orders to proceed toward Columbus and destroy the Mobile and Ohio Railroad as much as possible. The gallant Colonel has unfortunately not been heard of since, except through the Memphis Appeal, which says that near Okolona he was met by a large confederate force, was himself seriously wounded and lost fifteen men. The remainder, it is to be hoped, got safely back to La Grange. It rained all day on the twenty-first. The two Illinois regiments passed through Starkion. From the time the command left Starkville, Colonels Grierson and Prince, in consultation, felt thoroughly convinced that it was of the utmost importance that the railroad — or, at all events, the telegraph — should be interrupted between Okolona and Macon, as near Macon as possible; and two volunteer scouts, (private Post, of the Second Iowa, and private Parker, of the Sixth Illinois,) who had offered to do the work, backed out at last from the perilous undertaking. Believing it to be
Okanoxubee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 180
han the rest of the command; besides running great risk of being captured, as it was not known what force might be at Macon, nor what force might be following. He was instructed that if a free should be at Macon, he was to try and cross the Okanoxubee River, and move toward Decatur, in Newton County, by the shortest route. The gallant Captain proceeded on his perilous journey, and his Colonel says he feared he would never see him again; although he knew that he would accomplish all that could ow the latter place at one o'clock A. M., of the twenty-third. The distance marched this day was fifty-seven miles, over the most terrible roads that can be imagined. The march of the twenty-second was terrible, because the swamps of the Okanoxubee river were overflowed. After moving four miles south of Louisville, they marched a distance of eight miles through a swamp. On each side of the road were enormous trees, and the water was, everywhere, from three to four feet deep; with every fe
Garlandsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
clock. The bridges and trestles were found burned six miles each side of the station, seventy-five prisoners captured and paroled, two warehouses frill of commissary stores utterly destroyed by fire, and also four carloads of ammunition, mostly for heavy artillery. The bridges, etc., on the east side of the station were destroyed by the Second battalion of the Sixth Illinois, under Major M. H. Starr. The whole command left Newton at eleven A. M. of the twenty-fourth, and marched through Garlandville to the plantation of Mr. Bender, about twelve miles from Newton, where they encamped. The distance traversed on the twenty-third and twenty-fourth was eighty miles, and all this without scarcely halting. 25th.--They left camp at Bender's at eight A. M., and encamped for the night on Dr. Dore's plantation, eight miles east of Raleigh. It was at this place they were unhappily compelled to leave two or three soldiers, who were unable to travel further. The distance marched this day wa
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
oots and shoes, also hats and a large quantity of leather ; besides capturing a quartermaster from Port Hudson, who was getting supplies for his regiment. The two regiments — the Sixth Illinois in advance — passed through the little village of Louisville at half-past 7 P. M., and camped ten miles below the latter place at one o'clock A. M., of the twenty-third. The distance marched this day was fifty-seven miles, over the most terrible roads that can be imagined. The march of the twenty-second was terrible, because the swamps of the Okanoxubee river were overflowed. After moving four miles south of Louisville, they marched a distance of eight miles through a swamp. On each side of the road were enormous trees, and the water was, everywhere, from three to four feet deep; with every few hundred yards, a mire-hole in which frequently, for a few moments, man and horse were lost to view. The Seventh Illinois being in the rear, found these holes almost impassable, from the action of
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
t Old Blizzard was about. The Register little thought that it was only thirty-five brave fellows whom its terrified imagination had converted into one thousand five hundred Yankees. The Sixth and Seventh Illinois, under command of Colonel Grierson, left Hazlehurst at seven P. M., (the Sixth Illinois in advance,) passed through Gallatin and encamped near that place. A thirty-two pounder rifled Parrott gun, with one thousand four hundred pounds of powder, was here captured, en route to Grand Gulf. The distance travelled this day was thirty-seven miles. 28th.--They left camp at seven o'clock. At Hardgrove's, companies A, H, F, and M, were detailed, under command of Captain Trafton, to proceed to Bahala and destroy the railroad and transportation. The Sixth Illinois had a skirmish with some rebel cavalry, near Union Church, in which two of the enemy were wounded, and some prisoners taken. They camped at Union Church. Distance marched that day thirty miles. They left camp at
Osyka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
in the railroad at Bogue Chito; left that place at ten A. M., burning all bridges and trestles between there and Summit, where they arrived at five P. M., and again burnt several cars and a large amount of government property in the last locality. They encamped south-west of Summit, after marching over a distance of twenty-eight miles. May 1st.--They left camp at daylight, and proceeding in a south-westerly direction through the woods — without regard to roads — came into the Clinton and Osyka road, near a bridge four miles north-east of Wall's Post-office. About eighty of the enemy were lying in ambush near the bridge. Lieutenant-Colonel Blackburn, unfortunately with more bravery than discretion, proceeded across the bridge at the head of the scouts and of company G, Seventh Illinois. He was seriously wounded in the thigh, and slightly in the head. Colonel Prince immediately caused his men to dismount, to skirmish the enemy out of the bushes, and, with the assistance of Capta
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
was detached ten miles south of Starkville, to proceed to Macon, on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, to break up the rails, de, the telegraph — should be interrupted between Okolona and Macon, as near Macon as possible; and two volunteer scouts, (privMacon as possible; and two volunteer scouts, (private Post, of the Second Iowa, and private Parker, of the Sixth Illinois,) who had offered to do the work, backed out at last it to be very important that a feint should be made toward Macon, and no one appearing willing to do it, Colonel Prince--soo being captured, as it was not known what force might be at Macon, nor what force might be following. He was instructed that if a free should be at Macon, he was to try and cross the Okanoxubee River, and move toward Decatur, in Newton County, by thaptain Forbes, who, it will be remembered, had been sent to Macon, from near Starkville, rejoined the command just as they had all crossed Pearl River. Having been unable to take Macon, he followed their trail to Newton, where he was informed that t
Bahala (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
is, under command of Colonel Grierson, left Hazlehurst at seven P. M., (the Sixth Illinois in advance,) passed through Gallatin and encamped near that place. A thirty-two pounder rifled Parrott gun, with one thousand four hundred pounds of powder, was here captured, en route to Grand Gulf. The distance travelled this day was thirty-seven miles. 28th.--They left camp at seven o'clock. At Hardgrove's, companies A, H, F, and M, were detailed, under command of Captain Trafton, to proceed to Bahala and destroy the railroad and transportation. The Sixth Illinois had a skirmish with some rebel cavalry, near Union Church, in which two of the enemy were wounded, and some prisoners taken. They camped at Union Church. Distance marched that day thirty miles. They left camp at sunrise. Captain Trafton's battalion had come in at four A. M., having travelled some thirty miles more than the rest of the command, and having had several skirmishes, in which, without any loss, they captured ab
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
had marched forty miles this day. May 2d.--They marched again early in the morning, and the Sixth Illinois, being in advance, surprised and burned a rebel camp at Sandy Creek Bridge. At this point the Seventh Illinois was ordered in advance, and, at about nine o'clock A. M., as a crowning glory to this most extraordinary series of adventures, captured forty-two of Stewart's Mississippi cavalry on Comite River, including their Colonel. This noble band of toil-worn heroes arrived at Baton Rouge about noon of May second, where their triumphal entry created a furore of joyful excitement that will not cease till it has thrilled every loyal heart upon this continent — ay, every heart that loves liberty anil human bravery, through the civilized world. Some idea of the pluck and endurance of these men can be gleaned from the fact that during the last thirty hours--in which they had ridden eighty miles, fought two or three skirmishes, destroyed bridges, camps, equipages, etc. ; swai
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
s, and pushed onward cheerfully. 23d.--They broke camp at seven o'clock A. M., crossed the Pearl River at half-past 4 P. M., and took refreshments at Squire Payne's. A glance at the map will show the importance of Pearl River. Knowing it to be quite high from heavy rains, and aware also that as rebel scouts had preceded them, it was of the utmost consequence to secure Pearl River bridge, and the news about them was flying in all directions, it was a matter of life and death that Pearl River should be crossed, and the New-Orleans and Jackson Railroad reached without any delay whatevemove directly forward with two hundred picked men of his regiment, to secure the ferry across Pearl River before the enemy should be able to destroy it. The distance to the river was thirteen miles, d been sent to Macon, from near Starkville, rejoined the command just as they had all crossed Pearl River. Having been unable to take Macon, he followed their trail to Newton, where he was informed
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